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Re: Sacredness of the Peacock

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  • Mermaid
    Greetings Myriah and list, ... Sounds ... Here s a link (it s a good couple hours away from San Francisco): http://www.drba.org/ The gateway at the entrance is
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 6, 2001
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      Greetings Myriah and list,

       

      >Holly, I would love to know where the City of 10,000 Buddhas is.  Sounds 
      >wonder-filled.  
        
      Here’s a link (it’s a good couple hours away from  San Francisco ):
      http://www.drba.org/
        
      The gateway at the entrance is impressive to see as are the mural paintings.  Many of the buildings are painted a yellow-gold hue, an auspicious color. (“If yellow was the imperial colour in  China , this was because the emperor stood at the centre of the universe, like the Sun in the centre of Heavens.” From the Penguin Dictionary of Symbols, p. 1138.)  The Temple literally contains 10,000 golden figurines of the Buddha.  The gardening is done by persons residing at the Monastery.  
        
      >You asked why Quan Yin would have the peacock fan as a symbol.  It makes 
      >sense seeing as she raised her body and ascended, becoming an Ascended 
      >Master.  The peacock represents the  Phoenix rising from the ashes, and so it 
      >would be a perfect symbol for Her to use.
        
      Aha! J A light goes on…
        
      Here’s an excerpt from Patricia Monaghan’s Goddesses and Heroines regarding a story that might also apply here: “Sometimes it was said that Kuan-Yin originally lived on earth as Miao Shan, a young woman of unearthly virtue.  Although her father wished her to marry, Miao Shan decided to visit a monastery, which, contrary to her expectations, was a hotbed of vice.  Her father, hearing of her presence in the convent and suspecting the worst, burned it to the ground.  A rainbow carried her to heaven, where her innocent death earned her transmutation into the divine world.” (P. 186). (There could be a rainbow – peacock connection here, as well.)
        
      I also just now ‘got it’ that Quan Yin is sometimes portrayed as having a thousand arms or a thousand eyes so it’s possible that the many eyes of the peacock fan represent Her ceaseless vigilance and omnipresence – ‘She who hears the cries of the world”.
        
      Holly

       

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