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Re: [sl] re: pyramid name

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  • Stephen J.
    Hi Chris, If you can get a chance to look at a copy of W W Skeat s Etymological Dictionary of the English language published by oxford University, you will
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2001
      Hi Chris,

      If you can get a chance to look at a copy of W W Skeat's Etymological
      Dictionary of the English language published by oxford University, you will
      find the etymology of the words under discussion.

      All etymology IS 'folk etymology' - some words are better researched than
      others, some traced from their root meaning and others from 'back-rendering'
      (which is often a better way of understanding words) depending on their
      importance to the author at the time of his work. The word pyramid subscribes
      to this process perfectly, exactly as we today take the word 'television, or
      telephone,' etc, from the word 'tele' meaning far and then add the suffix in
      english to create a new word. We do not discern the meaning from tracing the
      etymology, but by back-rendering.

      The problem lies with the 'traditional' way of trying to understand words
      through etymology without realising that new words are often coined by common
      people with varied outlooks and splattering of knowledge in different
      languages striving to create words that carry the most meaning and they do so
      by scouring other languages to find words that already carry weight and
      meaning and adding to them to create a new word.

      Have a great day...

      Stephen

      canuck@... wrote:

      > > Like many words in use today in English the word Pyramid is a
      > compound of two words
      > > from different languages, Pyra - a Mid (Latin) The Pyra
      > originates from Latin,
      > > meaning fire and the Mid from Middle English meaning middle.
      >
      > But my point was that no etymological dictionary actually says
      > this...the link between pyra and especially mid is not stated in *
      > any* of them, except for the one on-line reference I found and
      > posted earlier. Could you provide a source for your argument?
      >
      > > However, intellectual arguments will not prove anything. This is
      > the problem with
      > > the mind, it wishes to know without allowing the changes to
      > take place that must
      > > come through 'knowing' - the only way to know for sure, is to
      > kindle the fire and
      > > feel it for oneself...
      >
      > Maybe so, but this does not apply to etymologies. As such, your
      > reading of the origin of the term falls into that class that is known
      > as "folk etymology" and is merely a back-rendering of the word
      > from its parts.
      >
      > Anyway, if you really want to make a strong argument you should
      > just state this flatly and then go on to make your observations.
      > As it is, your derivations of the word are a bit misleading for the
      > innoucous reader.
      >
      > Have a great day, too,
      >
      > -Chris
      >
      >
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
    • super_romeman@yahoo.com
      what is the origin, meaning and break-down of the word Pyramid . Is fire in the middle in any way relevant? Submitted by: Brian Miller (Adelaide -
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 2, 2001
        what is the origin, meaning and break-down of the word 'Pyramid'.
        Is 'fire in the middle' in any way relevant?
        Submitted by: Brian Miller (Adelaide - Australia)

        Middle is wrong, but fire may be right. Pyramid presents a problem to
        lexicographers, since it may - logically - come from some long
        forgotten Egyptian word. But the general belief divides betw. two
        Greek words, either 'pur' fire (your theory) or 'puros' wheat, grain,
        as if referring to a granary. The '-mides' part of the word is not a
        ref. to 'middle', but a Greek plural form of the original Greek
        word 'pyramis', itself meaning pyramid.

        Answered by the Word Wizard on May 13, 1997

        http://wordwizard.com/askww/foundaskww.asp?num=671



        --- In sacredlandscapelist@y..., canuck@c... wrote:
        >
        > > Like many words in use today in English the word Pyramid is a
        > compound of two words
        > > from different languages, Pyra - a Mid (Latin) The Pyra
        > originates from Latin,
        > > meaning fire and the Mid from Middle English meaning middle.
        >
        > But my point was that no etymological dictionary actually says
        > this...the link between pyra and especially mid is not stated in *
        > any* of them, except for the one on-line reference I found and
        > posted earlier. Could you provide a source for your argument?
        >
        > > However, intellectual arguments will not prove anything. This is
        > the problem with
        > > the mind, it wishes to know without allowing the changes to
        > take place that must
        > > come through 'knowing' - the only way to know for sure, is to
        > kindle the fire and
        > > feel it for oneself...
        >
        > Maybe so, but this does not apply to etymologies. As such, your
        > reading of the origin of the term falls into that class that is
        known
        > as "folk etymology" and is merely a back-rendering of the word
        > from its parts.
        >
        > Anyway, if you really want to make a strong argument you should
        > just state this flatly and then go on to make your observations.
        > As it is, your derivations of the word are a bit misleading for the
        > innoucous reader.
        >
        > Have a great day, too,
        >
        > -Chris
      • Stephen J.
        Hi there, I am aware of the traditional etymology and interpretations of the word pyramid and was explaining that all these interpretations cannot be proven as
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 2, 2001
          Hi there,

          I am aware of the traditional etymology and interpretations of the word
          pyramid and was explaining that all these interpretations cannot be proven as
          having 'meaning' - yet when a person learns to kindle the 'fire' within
          themselves, then the meaning of the word becomes clear.

          The pyramids are a testament to this fire and their name is important because
          the name of something sums up its essence.

          Have a great day,

          Stephen

          super_romeman@... wrote:

          > what is the origin, meaning and break-down of the word 'Pyramid'.
          > Is 'fire in the middle' in any way relevant?
          > Submitted by: Brian Miller (Adelaide - Australia)
          >
          > Middle is wrong, but fire may be right. Pyramid presents a problem to
          > lexicographers, since it may - logically - come from some long
          > forgotten Egyptian word. But the general belief divides betw. two
          > Greek words, either 'pur' fire (your theory) or 'puros' wheat, grain,
          > as if referring to a granary. The '-mides' part of the word is not a
          > ref. to 'middle', but a Greek plural form of the original Greek
          > word 'pyramis', itself meaning pyramid.
          >
          > Answered by the Word Wizard on May 13, 1997
          >
          > http://wordwizard.com/askww/foundaskww.asp?num=671
          >
          > --- In sacredlandscapelist@y..., canuck@c... wrote:
          > >
          > > > Like many words in use today in English the word Pyramid is a
          > > compound of two words
          > > > from different languages, Pyra - a Mid (Latin) The Pyra
          > > originates from Latin,
          > > > meaning fire and the Mid from Middle English meaning middle.
          > >
          > > But my point was that no etymological dictionary actually says
          > > this...the link between pyra and especially mid is not stated in *
          > > any* of them, except for the one on-line reference I found and
          > > posted earlier. Could you provide a source for your argument?
          > >
          > > > However, intellectual arguments will not prove anything. This is
          > > the problem with
          > > > the mind, it wishes to know without allowing the changes to
          > > take place that must
          > > > come through 'knowing' - the only way to know for sure, is to
          > > kindle the fire and
          > > > feel it for oneself...
          > >
          > > Maybe so, but this does not apply to etymologies. As such, your
          > > reading of the origin of the term falls into that class that is
          > known
          > > as "folk etymology" and is merely a back-rendering of the word
          > > from its parts.
          > >
          > > Anyway, if you really want to make a strong argument you should
          > > just state this flatly and then go on to make your observations.
          > > As it is, your derivations of the word are a bit misleading for the
          > > innoucous reader.
          > >
          > > Have a great day, too,
          > >
          > > -Chris
          >
          >
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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