Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re 'vitriol'

Expand Messages
  • mikebispham@cs.com
    Returning briefly to a recent subject, my old (1867) dictionary gives for vitriol ; a solid sulphate of any *metal*. This makes it far more significant I m
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 16, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Returning briefly to a recent subject, my old (1867) dictionary gives for
      'vitriol'; "a solid sulphate of any *metal*. This makes it far more
      significant I'm sure, but exactly why will take a bit more thought. If
      no-one beats me to it, I'll try to summarise all this a bit later.

      I've learned that 'salts' both then and now, refer loosly to any mineral in
      crystaline form. If you can get it to crystalise, its then a salt. A
      metallic salt (and I'm not sure if that's a correct useage, but you know what
      I mean) will be a source of the base metal, and, one might assume, will be
      held to carry some of the qualities of that metal. It will possibly be
      medicinally effective as a powder, or liquid. As a salt it will be called
      (a) 'vitriol'.

      BTW I often find old old books are better sources of historical references
      than newer. This is a copy of 'Chamber's Etymological Dictionary' - worth
      looking out for that 'Etymological' bit.

      Thanks sammis@... (sas) for the quotation from Andre Gide, Le
      Traite du Narcisse about re-crystalising -""Paradise must always be
      re-created..." I think its 18th or 19th C stuff, which puts it outside my
      period of enquiry, but still v interesting.

      In connection with 'Sol et Luna', I found a 13th C. (I think) pavement of
      what I presume to be Jesus (labelled) 'annis' - 'first cause', holding in his
      hands 'Sol' and 'Luna', and surrounded by the labours of the months - a
      zodiac, more or less. Are these then concepts of time?

      Mike
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.