Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Bulletin 3:32 (2009)

Expand Messages
  • Andreas Umland
    THE RUSSIAN NATIONALISM BULLETIN A Biweekly Newsletter of Current Affairs Vol. 2, No. 32(74), 5 November 2009 Compilers: Scott Littlefield & Andreas Umland I
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 5, 2009
      THE RUSSIAN NATIONALISM BULLETIN
      A Biweekly Newsletter of Current Affairs
      Vol. 2, No. 32(74), 5 November 2009
      Compilers: Scott Littlefield & Andreas Umland

      I NEWS: 15 - 31 October 2009
      II SURVEYS, ANALYSES, COMMENTS
      III ANNOTATIONS OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS

      [NOTE: When viewing an RNB issue in the Messages archive of the homepage and the end of the text is truncated, scroll to the end of the message and click "Expand Messages." Only then, the whole text of the - otherwise truncated - issue will appear.]
      ===========================


      I NEWS: 15 - 31 October 2009

      Ukrainian Pres Claims No Problems For Russian Language In Ukraine
      Itar-Tass, October 15, 2009

      KIEV, October 15(Itar-Tass) - It is not the Russian language but the Ukrainian language that is in the grips of a problem in Ukraine, President Viktor Yushchenko is reported to have said Thursday at a news conference in Brussels.
      He addressed it together with the Speaker of the Belgian Senate, Armand De Decker.
      When a reporter asked Yushchenko what experience Ukraine might take over from Belgium, a country having three official languages, he claimed that the problem of the Ukrainian language in his country is bigger than communications and it pertains to the sphere of national identity.
      He went on saying that solutions to such problems cannot be carbon-copied from other countries, as each nation resolves them taking account of its specific situation.
      Yushchenko said that Ukraine abides by European policies in the sphere of languages and this means that each ethnic minority has the right to develop its own language.
      For Ukraine, the essence of language policy is to recreate its national language and to give an opportunity to other languages to develop as well.
      He said that Ukraine has indeed scored some achievements in developing the Ukrainian languages but these achievements still fall short of the provisions spelt out by the Constitution and other national laws.
      Armand De Decker said in his turn that the co-existence of several official languages in Belgium is a factor of mutual collective enrichment.
      He admitted a certain controversy embedded in the situation, saying the diversity of official languages complicates political life and helps communications at the level of rank-and-file people at the same time.
      --------

      Kremlin Aide Slams Youth Policy
      By: Nikolaus von Twickel
      Moscow Times, October 16, 2009

      Ella Pamfilova, the beleaguered head of the Kremlin's human rights council, has sharply criticized the government's youth policy, which she said set up privileged groups whose members served as political pawns.
      "You must not divide the young into `ours' and `not ours' … and allow some to do practically everything while hampering the development of others," she told reporters Thursday.
      Pamfilova spoke after a bitter dispute with the pro-Kremlin youth movement Nashi, which means "ours" in Russian, earlier this month.
      Nashi activists and United Russia deputies had called for Pamfilova's dismissal after she condemned Nashi for "persecuting" journalist and human rights activist Alexander Podrabinek for his criticism of World War II veterans.
      Pamfilova said Thursday that the attack on her was "totally absurd" because it involved Duma deputies. "Lawmakers demanding the removal of the person whose role is to demand the observance of the law that is unprecedented," she said.
      She called on the government to change its youth policy. "It is very bad when young people get euphoric and break the law because they have support from senior government figures," she said. She added that the radical posture of many youth movements was bred by government policies. "This is inadmissible," she said.
      Nashi is said to be the brainchild of the Kremlin's first deputy chief of staff, Vladislav Surkov. The group reportedly started its harassment of Podrabinek after a meeting between Nashi leaders and Surkov.
      Pamfilova also said her 34-member council would meet President Dmitry Medvedev in November to discuss ways to strengthen civil society.
      The Podrabinek flap started when the journalist suggested in an article that members of the Moscow Union of Veterans were former "camp guards" and "executioners" for demanding that a Moscow restaurant change its name from Antisovetskaya, or Anti-Soviet, to Sovetskaya. The restaurant's owner has said he was forced to change the name under pressure from Oleg Mitvol, prefect for the Northern Administrative District. The veterans group had complained to Mitvol.
      Mitvol said Thursday that the restaurant might have staged the political conflict to distract from a quarrel with its bank. "One version is that he provoked a scandal … after he lost a court case against Sberbank, to which he now owes a few billion rubles," Mitvol said.
      --------

      RUSSIAN GAY LEADER CHIDES CLINTON
      Bigotry Monitor-UCSJ's weekly newsletter, Volume 9, Number 39, October 16, 2009

      On October 14, Russia's leading gay activist Nikolai Alexeyev said that he was disappointed that Secretary Clinton met with an outspoken foe of gay rights and did not decry homophobia in the country, the Associated Press reported. Clinton attended a ceremony unveiling a statue of Walt Whitman at Moscow State University, along with officials including Mayor Yuri Luzhkov who was apparently unaware of Whitman's status in the U.S. as a gay icon. In the past, Luzhkov repeatedly blocked attempts to hold gay pride marches in Moscow and described gay people as "satanic."

      http://www.ucsj.org/bigotry-monitor/volume-9-2009/volume-9-number-39-october-16-2009
      -----

      IN MOSCOW, RACISTS ATTACK CITIZENS OF NIGERIA AND CONGO
      Bigotry Monitor-UCSJ's weekly newsletter, Volume 9, Number 39, October 16, 2009

      Two separate racist attacks took place in Moscow late last month, according to an October 13 report by the Sova Center for Information and Analysis. Citing the Moscow Protestant Chaplaincy, which has many foreigners among its parishioners, Sova reported that on September 22, two youths attacked a Nigerian man while shouting racist abuse. On September 26, four youths attacked a man from Congo after chasing him down while screaming racist insults.
      The Nigerian victim reported the incident to the police; the citizen of Congo did not.

      http://www.ucsj.org/bigotry-monitor/volume-9-2009/volume-9-number-39-october-16-2009
      ----

      Kirov Police Allegedly Torture Man Out of Racist Motives
      UCSJ, October 19, 2009

      Police in a Kirov region village allegedly tortured a man while
      insulting his ethnic background, according to an October 14, 2009
      report by the Sova Information-Analytical Center. Shovket Piriev, an
      ethnic Azeri, told a local newspaper cited in the Sova report that
      police in Yur'ya detained him in his home on what he claimed are false
      drug charges and took him to the federal anti-narcotics police
      station. On the way there, the officers allegedly called him a
      "churok" (a pejorative for dark skinned migrants) and then started to
      beat him. They continued with other racist insults, and then allegedly
      threatened to smash his head in. At the station, police officers
      reportedly continued to beat him even more severely. Two days later,
      he was released and went to the hospital, where he was admitted with
      several injuries. It is not clear from the report if police have
      dropped the drug charges, or if Mr. Piriev was simply released pending
      a trial.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/kirov-police-allegedly-torture-man-out-of-racist-motives
      ------

      Orenburg Court Sentences Neo-Nazis for Murder, Extremism
      UCSJ, October 19, 2009

      A court in Orenburg, Russia sentenced five neo-Nazis for stabbing an
      Uzbek man to death, according to an October 5, 2009 report by the
      local affiliate of the State Television and Radio Company (GTRK). The
      youths videotaped the February 2007 murder and posted the footage on
      the Internet, so it is not clear why the sentencing took over two
      years. Due to this delay, only three of the defendants were sentenced
      to prison time--seven and eight years in prison for the two extremists
      that the court determined stabbed the victim, and three years for
      another defendant. Prosecutors dropped charges against the other two
      defendants, since the statute of limitations had expired on their
      crime at some point during the drawn out trial.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/orenburg-court-sentences-neo-nazis-murder-extremism
      --------

      Tyumen Prosecutors Wrap Up Investigation of Professor Who Spread Blood Libel
      UCSJ, October 19, 2009

      Prosecutors in Tyumen, Russia have concluded their investigation into
      the antisemitic lectures of a local university professor, according to
      an October 15, 2009 report by the Sova Information-Analytical Center.
      Sova's brief report only mentioned that Svetlana Shestakovaya was
      charged with inciting ethnic hatred, and that her lectures were
      evaluated by government-appointed experts who agreed that her
      statements qualify as incitement.
      UCSJ reported last year that Professor Shestakovaya, who teaches
      sociology at Tyumen State Oil-Gas University, gave a series of
      lectures on the topic of "Sectarian Studies" in a course geared toward
      the preparation of future public school teachers of the "Fundamentals
      of Orthodox Culture" curriculum, which is being taught in an
      increasing number of Russian schools, usually but not always as an
      elective.
      During her lectures, she reportedly claimed that Jews ritually murder
      Christian children and use their blood to bake matzo. She added that:
      "They use a special method for killing an Orthodox child or a saint,
      such as when the Tsar's family was killed... they were bled because a
      live person needs to be stabbed before he is dead, and while he dies,
      the blood comes out... That's why sometimes children go missing, it's
      the Jews..."
      It isn't clear from the report when the professor's trial will start.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/tyumen-prosecutors-wrap-investigation-of-professor-who-spread-blood-libel
      -----

      Moscow closes two Nativ offices
      JTA, October 19, 2009

      JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Russian officials reportedly closed two local offices of Israel's Nativ organization.
      The St. Petersburg and Novosibirsk offices of the group, which helps Jews from the former Soviet Union make aliyah, have been closed, according to a report Oct. 14 in the Israeli daily Ma'ariv.
      The closings will make it difficult, if not impossible, for more than 200 Russian Jews currently seeking to leave for Israel to receive the documents they need, the newspaper reported.
      Nativ's primary work is to determine if Russian Jews requesting to immigrate to Israel are eligible to make aliyah under the Law of Return.
      The move comes two weeks after Israeli diplomat Shmuel Polishuk, head of the Nativ delegation to Russia, was asked to leave the country.
      Polishuk, according to media reports including Ma'ariv and Reuters, was sent out of the country after being accused of espionage. Nativ officials also told Ma'ariv that Russian security agencies were following Nativ employees and interfering in their work.
      "Shmuel Polishuk was caught red-handed in Moscow," Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Andrei Nesterenko told Reuters, though Polishuk was not declared a persona non-grata by Moscow, which is usually done to suspected spies.
      The Israeli government formally cut links between Nativ and Israeli intelligence services a decade ago.
      During Soviet times, Nativ developed covert contacts with Jews in the Soviet bloc, but with the lifting of the Iron Curtain, it became directly involved in encouraging Jews from the former Soviet Union to make aliyah.

      http://jta.org/news/article/2009/10/19/1008586/moscow-closes-two-nativ-offices
      --------

      Medvedev Calls Disgusting Attempts To Equally Blame Nazi, USSR For WW2
      Itar-Tass, October 20, 2009

      BELGRADE, October 20 (Itar-Tass) -- Russian President Dmitry Medvedev has called disgusting the attempts to equally share the responsibility for the beginning of WW2 between Nazi Germany and the former Soviet Union.
      "Serbs do not have to be told who was right," he told the Serbian parliament on Tuesday, on the occasion of the 65th anniversary of Belgrade's liberation from the Nazi. "
      Europe failed to deter the Third Reich.
      A number of states supported and even fought for the Hitler regime.
      Some countries chose collaboration and helped the Hitler military machinery with supplies.
      I must say that the responsibility of those political administrations is also obvious: the number of victims of the Nazi might have been much smaller if not for their support," he said.
      "Everyone, especially those who are trying to rewrite history for their advantage, must remember that.
      Certainly, such persons need the thesis of the allegedly equal responsibility of Nazi Germany and the former Soviet Union.
      None will idealize the Stalin regime, but it was not the USSR that started that war.
      All honest people know that.
      Distorting history is an unpleasant or even disgusting business.
      We view such attempts as a disregard of the Nuremberg Trials and a blasphemy as regards victims of the most terrible war of the 20th century," Medvedev said.
      "Russia stands for a thorough scrutiny of history lessons.
      We will stick to this policy and resist any attempts to falsify the truth about that war," he said.
      --------

      Crackdown on Jehovah's Witnesses in Two Russian Cities
      UCSJ, October 20, 2009

      Police in two Russian cities targeted Jehovah's Witnesses in what
      appears to be a mounting crackdown on members of that faith, according
      to an October 16, 2009 report by the religious news web site
      portal-credo.ru. In Kurgan, police confiscated religious literature
      from Jehovah's Witnesses. On September 30, police in St. Petersburg
      detained 68 Jehovah's Witnesses during a religious service, telling
      the worshippers that they were engaged in extremist and illegal
      activity.
      The latest crackdown appears to have been inspired, at least in part,
      by a court ruling in Taganrog that classified a local Jehovah's
      Witnesses congregation an extremist group and ordered it
      disbanded.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/crackdown-jehovahs-witnesses-two-russian-cities
      ------

      Ulyanovsk Prosecutors Wrap Up Neo-Nazi Murder Case
      UCSJ, October 20, 2009

      Prosecutors in Ulyanovsk, Russia have concluded their investigation
      into a neo-Nazi group, setting the stage for their trial on murder and
      extremism charges, according to an October 20, 2009 report by the
      regions.ru web site. Police detained eight members of the "Simbirsk
      White Power" gang on suspicion of stabbing to death a citizen of
      Cameroon in August of 2008. In addition, two gang members face charges
      of forming an extremist group, while the remaining six face the lesser
      charges of participating in an extremist group. Their trial date was
      not specified in the report.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/ulyanovsk-prosecutors-wrap-neo-nazi-murder-case
      -----

      Russian launches Internet portal to fight 'falsification of history' - agency
      Interfax, October 21, 2009

      Moscow, 21 October: A project called Runivers (www.runivers.ru) has been launched in Russia. It offers to all Internet users free access to original historical materials, which will make it possible to counter attempts to falsify Russian history, the head of the project, Mikhail Baranov, has said.
      "The purpose of our project is to provide free access to original documents, books and texts on Russian history, which are kept in major libraries and state archives," the president of the board of the Runivers autonomous non-commercial organization for the creation and development of a historical and cultural electronic encyclopedia and library, Mikhail Baranov, said at a news conference on Wednesday (21 October).
      Baranov said: "We want to return original books and encyclopaedias on Russian history published in the late 19th - early 20th century into cultural circulation."
      He added that at the moment the project had 600 books, however by the end of the year it was planned to upload some 1,000 books.
      One of the sections will feature documents on topical political issues, which are being actively discussed, in particular compilations of documents on the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, the Katyn case, on how the Crimea, Ossetia and Abkhazia, the Kuril Islands and East Prussia joined Russia.
      Baranov said that the books were uploaded in their original form and may be of use to professionals who study Russian history. The project does not ban copying or citing its materials.
      Baranov said that the project had been prompted by the lack of truthful information on Russian history both in the Internet and in bookstores, where there are mainly translated books by foreign authors, which are often of an anti-Russian nature, and access to similar materials is mainly on a paid basis.
      For his part, a State Duma deputy, a member of the Runivers board, Vladimir Medinskiy, PhD in Political Studies, said: "Russia does not have an institution that would be dealing in historical propaganda, which is why we are losing in the war aimed to falsify Russian history." (Passage omitted)
      "The Runivers and similar projects should enjoy powerful state support," he said. (Passage omitted)
      ------

      Kids No Longer Taught Russian In Sevastopol's Kindergartens
      Itar-Tass, October 21, 2009

      LVOV, October 21 (Itar-Tass) -- Kids in kindergartens in Sevastopol are no longer taught to read and write in Russian as all teaching is conducted in Ukrainian under a new programmed titled "I and the World" approved by the Ministry of Education, the city's independent television said on Wednesday.
      Educationalist Lyudmila Tomilskaya said children begin to study Ukrainian from the age of three. The subject is called "Native Tongue". "The programme does specify Russian or Ukrainian, but includes a separate position for kindergartener who teaches Ukrainian. The parents of the children buy Russian textbooks at their own expense and ask kindergarteners to teach their children to read and write in the native language because city schools expect first-graders to have such skills," she said.
      On October 13, the City Council called for signing a Public Agreement in the Field of Education and Science that should guarantee Sevastopol residents' right to choose the language of teaching and study in Russian or the languages of ethnic minorities.
      The agreement requires the city administration to provide funding for events designed to facilitate the study of Russian and the languages of ethnic minorities.
      The lawmakers also called for creating an executive body in the field of education within the city administration, ensuring independent testing in Russian for graduates seeking to enrol in higher educational institutions, and supplying schools with Russian-language textbooks on all subjects.
      All these decisions run counter to the Ukrainian Ministry of Education. Deputy mayor Vladimir Kazarin said at a briefing, "There is no money in the budget for these decisions, and it would be easier to dissolve the Sevastopol City Council".
      He said "the fight for the Russian language in Sevastopol schools an election campaign".
      As the presidential election nears, the preservation of the Russian language and its status as a second official language become increasingly relevant political issue in Ukraine.
      Regional mass media have been constantly complaining that the Russian language is being more and more forced out of the information environment in Ukraine.
      Electronic mass media - television and the radio -- are hit hardest. Pursuant to a new version of the Ukrainian Law "On Television and Radio Broadcasting", broadcasts in Ukrainian should be at least 75 percent, compared to 50 percent before. "Violators" will not be granted licenses, and regional peculiarities are not taken into account.
      The National Council on Television and Radio Broadcasting has obligated the Sevastopol television and radio company to increase its broadcasts in Ukraine to at least 75 percent of airtime form January 1, 2009, even though 93 percent of people living in the city speak Russian.
      However, Ukrainian Foreign Ministry spokesman Vasily Kirilich believes that the problem of the Russian language in the country is far-fetched.
      "I do not see any problems with the Russian language in Ukraine," he said.
      In Ukraine "every citizen speaks the language which he considers native or which he more comfortable for communication", Kirilich said.
      "Where else in the world is there a parliament where deputies speak a foreign .125Russian.375 language, except for the Ukrainian Verkhovna Rada?" he said.
      He stressed the need "to speak about what Ukraine and Russia have in common rather then focus on what they have in difference".
      "Our countries have very many common and generally positive things," Kirilich said.
      Ukraine does not have to account to anyone for its language policy, Culture and Tourism Minister Vasily Vovkun said.
      "Our actions should be principled, consistent and offensive because they are based on the Constitution of Ukraine and national interests," Vovkun said.
      The minister made it clear that "the development of an integral national language and cultural space based on the promotion of the Ukrainian language in all spheres of public life, on the presence of the national cultural product in proper volumes on the domestic market has been determined by the government as an important strategic objective. But the implementation of this strategic task envisages, among other things, the adoption and practical realisation of Ukraine's Language Policy Concept, the new Ukrainian law 'On the Official Language', and amendments to the Law on the Ratification of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages."
      The head of the Russian Federal Agency for CIS Affairs, Compatriots Living Abroad and International Humanitarian Cooperation, Farit Mukhametshin, said earlier that "Ukraine is a country of real bilingualism, but this is not reflected in any law".
      "Banning restrictions on the use of a certain language is one of the paramount principles of international law. In our view, Ukraine doesn't comply with the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. When visiting certain Ukrainian regions OSCE High Commissioner on National Minorities Knut Vollebaek said 'one couldn't strengthen one language at the expense of the other'," the Russian official said.
      -------

      Racists Attack Chinese in Blagoveshchensk
      UCSJ, October 22, 2009

      A group of youths attacked four citizens of China in Blagoveshchensk,
      Russia (Amur region), according to an October 20, 2009 report by the
      Sova Information-Analytical Center. On the night of October 19, the
      youths reportedly burst into the train car where the four Chinese live
      and started pelting them with stones. One of the victims lost his eyes
      and had to undergo emergency surgery at a local hospital. Police
      detained a local extremist nationalist in connection with the attack.
      According to local police, a group of youths beat an elderly Chinese
      man to death last month in Blagoveshchensk, as well as assaulting
      another elderly victim. Police detained suspects in that case as well.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/racists-attack-chinese-blagoveshchensk
      --------

      Syktyvkar Baptists Request Incitement Charges Against Local Orthodox Newspaper
      UCSJ, October 22, 2009

      A Baptist pastor in Syktyvkar, Russia (Komi Republic) has sent an
      official request to the local prosecutor's office asking for charges
      of incitement of religious hatred to be filed against the regional
      diocese of the Russian Orthodox Church, according to an October 21,
      2009 report by the Slavic Center for Law and Justice, a religious
      liberty NGO. Pastor Vasily Legky attached a copy of an article
      published in the diocese's newspaper "Eparkhalnye Vedomosti" entitled
      "Warning: Destructive Movements, Sects and Cults" to his official
      complaint. According to his complaint, the author of the article
      called Baptists a "sect" and murderers of human souls. Pastor Legky
      linked the article's publication to acts of vandalism that targeted
      his church.
      "Eparkhalnye Vedomosti" was earlier subject to a similar complaint
      from the local branch of the human rights NGO "Memorial" for
      publishing an article entitled "Kike Heresies" but prosecutors found
      no evidence of incitement in the text of that article.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/syktyvkar-baptists-request-incitement-charges-against-local-orthodox-newspaper
      ------

      Yushchenko Compromises On Russian Language
      Itar-Tass, October 23, 2009

      DONETSK, October 23 (Itar-Tass) -- In an attempt to win votes of Russian-speakers at the upcoming election in January Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko admitted it was important to know the Russian language.
      "I am not a politician or citizen who would say that we have to speak Russian. We have to know it and those who want can speak it," he told a meeting with intellectuals on Thursday in Kharkov.
      "I wouldn't say the Russian language will save us, but it has to be known. I am not going to say our salvation is in the knowledge only of the Ukrainian language. That would be another mistake", he added.
      "If you live in Ukraine you must know the Ukrainian language," he stressed, but said Russian is necessary as "most of our interests are implemented through Russia."
      "The question is not either .875 or", Yushchenko said and advised also to learn the English language.
      -------

      PROSECUTION OF HISTORIAN AND HIS POLICEMAN HELPER PROTESTED
      Bigotry Monitor-UCSJ's weekly newsletter, Volume 9, Number 40, October 23, 2009

      Human rights campaigners have taken up the cause of a historian and a policeman in Arkhangelsk who are being prosecuted for collecting information about German and Polish political prisoners in the 1940s, Interfax has reported. A criminal case has been launched against Prof. Mikhail Suprun of Pomorskiy State University and Col. Aleksandr Dudarev, head of the information center of the Directorate of Internal Affairs (UVD) for Arkhangelsk Region, according to a statement issued by the human rights center Memorial, focused on the exoneration of victims of political repression in the USSR.
      According to Memorial, Suprun is being prosecuted for collecting information from a database about Poles and Germans who were deported to a special settlement in the Arkhangelsk Region during the 1940s, and Dudarev is being prosecuted for assisting Suprun's research. "The first is prosecuted for doing his job and the second for performing his duties," Memorial said. "The grounds for the prosecution are absurd,"
      Memorial pointed out that the case is causing alarm in the context of recent tendencies to embellish Stalin's image and keep silent about the crimes of the Communist regime. "On the other hand, it might be 'just' an acute form of relapse into the mania of secrecy inherited from the Soviet Union," the statement cautioned, calling it "extremely dangerous" because "through the closure of access to archives, Russia is being deprived of its history and its memory, which are the foundations of the national identity."

      http://www.ucsj.org/bigotry-monitor/volume-9-2009/volume-9-number-40-october-23-2009
      -------

      PROSECUTORS WRAP UP NEO-NAZI MURDER CASE
      Bigotry Monitor-UCSJ's weekly newsletter, Volume 9, Number 40, October 23, 2009

      Prosecutors in Ulyanovsk have concluded their investigation of a neo-Nazi group, setting the stage for their trial on murder and extremism charges, according to an October 20 report by the regions.ru web site. Police detained eight members of the Simbirsk White Power gang on suspicion of stabbing to death a citizen of Cameroon in August 2008. In addition, two gang members face charges of forming an extremist group, while the remaining six face the lesser charges of participating in an extremist group. Their trial date was not specified.

      http://www.ucsj.org/bigotry-monitor/volume-9-2009/volume-9-number-40-october-23-2009
      ---------

      Tribute Will Be Paid to Victims of Stalinist Purges in Moscow on Oct 29
      Interfax, October 26, 2009

      MOSCOW. Oct 26 (Interfax) - People executed in Moscow during the Stalinist purges will be remembered on October 29 at the Solovetsky stone in Lubyanka during the Returning Names action organized by the Memorial human rights society.
      The event has been held for several years on the eve of October 30 - the Day of Remembrance of Victims of Soviet Political Repression.
      "Between 10 a.m. and 10 p.m. participants whom anyone can join will be reading out the names of people shot in Moscow on false political charges. In 1937-1938 alone over 30,000 people were executed in Moscow," Memorial board member Yan Rachinsky has told Interfax.
      During the traditional action people carry flowers, candles and photos of purge victims to the Solovetsky stone. The event is usually opened by human rights commissioner Vladimir Lukin who reads out the first names from the list of victims.
      ------

      Yanukovich Vows To Make Russian Second Official Language In Ukraine
      Itar-Tass, October 26, 2009

      KIEV, October 26 (Itar-Tass) -- Opposition Party of Regions leader Viktor Yanukovich, who is running for Ukrainian presidency, suggesting making Russian a second official language in the country.
      In his election programme titled "Ukraine for People" published on Monday, Yanukovich said specifically, "I want to see a real conformation of European standards of democracy and consistent efforts to ensure human rights and freedoms in Ukraine."
      "I am a consistent advocate of a civilised solution to this question, a balanced state language policy that adequately responds to linguistic needs of society and is consistent with the generally recognised norms of international law, the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages," Yanukovich said.
      He and Prime Minister Yulia Timoshenko are considered to be the main candidates for the presidency in the upcoming election slated for January 2010.
      As the presidential election nears, the preservation of the Russian language and its status as a second official language become increasingly relevant political issue in Ukraine.
      Regional mass media have been constantly complaining that the Russian language is being more and more forced out of the information environment in Ukraine.
      Electronic mass media - television and the radio -- are hit hardest. Pursuant to a new version of the Ukrainian Law "On Television and Radio Broadcasting", broadcasts in Ukrainian should be at least 75 percent, compared to 50 percent before. "Violators" will not be granted licenses, and regional peculiarities are not taken into account.
      The National Council on Television and Radio Broadcasting has obligated the Sevastopol television and radio company to increase its broadcasts in Ukraine to at least 75 percent of airtime form January 1, 2009, even though 93 percent of people living in the city speak Russian.
      However, Ukrainian Foreign Ministry spokesman Vasily Kirilich believes that the problem of the Russian language in the country is far-fetched.
      "I do not see any problems with the Russian language in Ukraine," he said.
      In Ukraine "every citizen speaks the language which he considers native or which he more comfortable for communication", Kirilich said.
      "Where else in the world is there a parliament where deputies speak a foreign .125Russian.375 language, except for the Ukrainian Verkhovna Rada?" he said.
      He stressed the need "to speak about what Ukraine and Russia have in common rather then focus on what they have in difference".
      "Our countries have very many common and generally positive things," Kirilich said.
      Ukraine does not have to account to anyone for its language policy, Culture and Tourism Minister Vasily Vovkun said.
      "Our actions should be principled, consistent and offensive because they are based on the Constitution of Ukraine and national interests," Vovkun said.
      The minister made it clear that "the development of an integral national language and cultural space based on the promotion of the Ukrainian language in all spheres of public life, on the presence of the national cultural product in proper volumes on the domestic market has been determined by the government as an important strategic objective. But the implementation of this strategic task envisages, among other things, the adoption and practical realisation of Ukraine's Language Policy Concept, the new Ukrainian law 'On the Official Language', and amendments to the Law on the Ratification of the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages."
      President Viktor Yushchenko has said lately that the Russian language should be known, and if one knows it he can speak it. But he should also now Ukraine if he chooses to live in Ukraine.
      -------

      Abusing Anti-Incitement Laws, Petersburg Prosecutors Sanction Jewish School
      UCSJ, October 27, 2009

      Prosecutors in St. Petersburg, Russia officially warned a Jewish
      school on the grounds that it supposedly violated the law by requiring
      pupils to prove Jewish ancestry, according to an October 23, 2009
      report by the Regnum news agency. Prosecutors from the city's Vyborsky
      district cited the "Menakhen" school after receiving a complaint that
      its policy of excluding pupils who cannot prove that their mothers are
      Jewish is discriminatory and against the Constitution, which
      guarantees equal rights, regardless of ethnic or religious
      affiliation. According to the report, the school changed its policies
      "voluntarily" after receiving the warning. According to a report by
      the Sova Center, the far-right Movement Against Illegal Immigration
      initiated the complaint that started the investigation into the
      school.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/abusing-anti-incitement-laws-petersburg-prosecutors-sanction-jewish-school
      ------

      Russian Church believes symbols of Stalin epoch in Moscow tube can split society
      Interfax-Religion, October 27, 2009

      Moscow, October 27, Interfax – The Moscow Patriarchate is afraid that certain symbols of the Stalin epoch appearing in the Moscow tube can split people.
      "When we restore symbols that indeed will help divide people, I can't agree,' head of the Moscow Patriarchate Publishing House Archpriest Vladimir Silovyev said at a press conference dedicated to discussions around lines of Soviet hymn glorifying Stalin and Lenin that appeared in interior of the Kurskaya metro station in Moscow.
      Fr. Vladimir said Soviet symbols of certain content were once removed from the Moscow tube as "serious work on getting rid of negative Stalin heritage" was conducted then.
      Fr. Vladimir recalled an ancient Orthodox tradition to set up memorial chapels and churches at sites of bloody battles and fights and pointed out to Borodino and the Kulikovo Field. According to him, late 1990 – early 2000 also gave tragic reasons not to give up this tradition. Chapels are constructed in place of apartment buildings exploded in Moscow, today people pray for peace there.

      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=6586
      ---------

      Moscow Neo-Nazis Assault Son of Migrant Community Leader
      UCSJ, October 28, 2009

      Around half a dozen neo-Nazis assaulted the son of the Federation of
      Migrants in Moscow after he attempted to stop them from beating up
      some Tajiks, according to an October 26, 2009 report by Gazeta.ru.
      Artyom Nekrasov witnessed the assault on the Tajiks on October 25 and,
      along with a friend, tried to stop it, but was instead beaten himself
      and ended up in the hospital with a broken nose. Police have not yet
      opened an investigation of the crime. Federation of Migrants head
      Madzhumder Amin sent an official complaint to the district prosecutor
      about the crime and the police's slow reaction to it.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/moscow-neo-nazis-assault-son-of-migrant-community-leader
      --------

      Possible Racist Murder in Moscow
      UCSJ, October 28, 2009

      A group of "aggressive youths" stabbed and beat to death an Asian man
      in eastern Moscow, according to an October 25, 2009 report by Ekho
      Moskvy radio. The victim was killed with knives and several blows from
      metal pipes, according to the report. Police are investigating the
      incident.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/possible-racist-murder-moscow
      -------

      Soviet antireligious posters and desecrated icons to be exhibited in Moscow
      Interfax-Religion, October 28, 2009

      Moscow, October 28, Interfax – The Moscow House of Icon opens an exposition of Soviet leaflets and posters on anti-religious theme.
      Visitors will have a chance to watch documentaries from video archives showing destruction of churches in tragic years of "atheistic five-year plans," the museum workers told Interfax-Religion.
      The exhibition will represent icons damaged by atheistic fighters in 1920s, including the Icon of Our Lady of the Sign dated by the 18th century, the surface with the Mother of God's face is cut with stars.
      Another icon shows a piece of the Last Judgment composition dated by the 17th century. Moscow Region farmers used this icon as a bail in the cowshed for fifty years.
      The House of Icon opened in Moscow on September 18 on the initiative of a patron of arts to promote Orthodox icon painting and study its history.

      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=6588
      -------

      Luzhkov Says No Stalin Monument for Metro
      Moscow Times, October 29, 2009

      Mayor Yury Luzhkov on Wednesday denied that a monument to Stalin would be installed in the Kurskaya metro station.
      Moscow's chief architect, Alexander Kuzmin, said Friday that he wanted to return Kurskaya to its original appearance, noting that it contained a monument to Stalin when it opened in 1950.
      But Luzhkov described media reports claiming that the monument would be reinstalled as "baseless," Interfax reported.
      The circle line station reopened in August after a reconstruction that included the return of a verse from the 1944 version of the Soviet anthem praising Stalin to the entrance hall, provoking a heated public debate. City authorities over the weekend returned another part of the verse, this time praising Lenin.
      The verse in its entirety now reads, "The sun of freedom shone on us through storms, and the great Lenin illuminated our way. Stalin raised us to be loyal to the nation; He inspired us to work and be heroic!"
      The Russian Orthodox Church has decried the return of Stalin's and Lenin's names to the artwork. Church spokesman Vladimir Silovyev said at a news conference Tuesday that the Soviet symbols would "divide" the people, RIA-Novosti reported.
      Meanwhile, the head of City Hall's cultural heritage committee, Vladimir Shevchuk, said Wednesday that his agency would file a complaint with prosecutors if metro directors failed to provide documents legalizing the reconstruction of the Kurskaya within two weeks.
      -------

      Russia Marks Day Of Victims Of Political Repressions
      Itar-Tass, October 30, 2009

      MOSCOW, September 30 (Itar-Tass) - Friday, October 30, Russia marked the Day of Victims of Political Repressions. A public meeting against repressions and for defense of the victims of political persecutions was held in Moscow.
      Thursday, activists of the Memorial human rights association and non-partisan Muscovites read out the names of people who had suffered under the totalitarian regime.
      There can be no justification to repressions, President Dmitry Medvedev said in an address placed on his video blog.
      He condemned the repressions, including the ones conducted by Joseph Stalin, calling them "criminal". "No kind of supreme state objectives can serve as a justification of numerous takeaways of human lives," Medvedev said.
      October 30 as a Remembrance Day was established in 1991 by a resolution of the Supreme Soviet of the then Russian Soviet Federal Socialist Republic /RSFSR/.
      According to the latest research data, the 'authorized state agencies' passed 52 million politically motivated sentences, sent almost 13 million people to concentration and labor camps, made 6 million people resettle forcibly without court sentences, and executed about a million people by shooting from the 1920's through the 1950's.
      Independent experts claim these figures are understated. For instance, Dr Irina Karatsuba, a lecturer at Moscow Lomonosov State University insists on the correctness of data cited to Nikita Khrushchev in 1956 by a veteran member of the Bolshevik party, Olga Shatunovskaya. A commission she chaired said in materials drafted for the pivotal 20th Congress of the Soviet Communist Party that a total of 18.6 million people had served terms in Gulag camps between January 1, 1935, and June 22, 1941. Of that number, 7 million people died.
      "These figures remain practically unknown, in much the same way as the results of work of the Shatunovskaya commission are practically unknown to research quarters these days," Karatsuba said. "These materials have been lost somewhere."
      "But if you speak about Stalin's purges, then add to this the victims of the early 1930's when millions of people died of famine in the aftermath of his policy of collectivization," she told the Narodnaya Gazeta Internet publication.
      There can be no justification of repressions, as nothing can be placed above the value of human life, President Dmitry Medvedev said right on the day of commemoration in a statement placed on his personal blog.
      "Let us just simply give a thought to the fact that millions of people died due to terror and false accusations, and millions were denied all the rights, even the right to a dignified burial," he said. "For many long years, their names were crossed out of history."
      "It is scarcely possible to imagine the sweep of terror that embraced all the ethnic groups living in this country," Medvedev said. "Its peak fell on the years 1937 and 1938. Whole sections of our society were wiped out in the course of the two decades preceding World War II."
      "The Cossacks were practically eradicated, the peasants were 'dispossessed' and left bleeding," he went on saying. "Political persecutions affected the intellectuals, workers, the military, and the followers of absolutely all the religious denominations."
      Medvedev indicated that the memory of national tragedies is as sacred as the memory of national achievements and "Stalin's crimes cannot belittle the nation's heroic deeds."
      He made known his concern over the way that the young Russians treat their country's history. As an instance of this, he recalled an opinion poll taken two years ago, in which 90% young respondents in the age group of 18 years old to 24 years old proved unable to name any famous people who were repressed or died in the course of purges.
      "This can't help worrying us," Medvedev said.
      He made known his strong opposition to the claims that the multiplicity of victims was justified by supreme state objectives of some kind.
      "I'm firmly convinced that no development objectives, no successes scored by a country, and no ambitions should be attained by throwing people into grief and losses," Medvedev indicated. "There's nothing to be placed above the value of human life and that's why there can be no justification to repressions."
      He called for averting a situation where the individuals who exterminated their own people get moral aquittals under the guise of restoration of historical truth.
      A public debate about Stalin's role in history has flared up again recently, partly due to a scandal around the results of restoration works in the foyer of the Kurskaya metro station, one of city's busiest stations used daily by many dozens of thousands of passengers.
      Specifically, the architectural supervisors of the project have permitted to restore a line from the Stalin-era Soviet national anthem that decorates the space under the ceiling of the foyer. The line reads: "Be true to the people, thus Stalin has reared us, inspired us to labor and valorous deeds." This stirred protests among human rights activists.
      To no small a degree, debate inside Russia was fuelled by Moscow's reaction to the PACE resolution on Stalinism, which the Russian Foreign Ministry and the State Duma summed up as a document "putting an equation mark between Nazism and Stalin's state system that destroyed it."
      The session that was held in July in Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania, passed the resolution initiated by Slovene and Lithuanian MPs. It claimed that European countries suffered from two types of regimes, the Nazi
      and the Stalinist ones, in the 20th century.
      In Moscow, reading-out of the lists of Muscovites who lost their lives or suffered during the totalitarian regime began Thursday in the course of an action titled 'A Return of the Names'.
      Ombudsman for human rights Vladimir Lukin, who addressed the gathering, said many Russians see their country's past in bright colors today and "perceive personages of the past decades through a highly mythological and idealized prism."
      "It's important to tell the people who those personages were in reality," Lukin said.
      In the meantime, NEWSru.com news portal has quoted Western sources as saying Russia is unfolding a campaign to beef up the nation's image, and one of its integral parts focuses on making Stalin's image far less odious.
      Members of the Memorial human rights organization insist, on the face of it, on the importance of a "de-Stalinization" course for Russian society. Arseny Roginsky, the chairman of Memorial's board, believes that de-Stalinization is Russia's acutest problem at the moment.
      He said, among other things, that Russia still does not have an all-nation monument to Stalin's terror victims or a National Book of Memory. Nor do school textbooks tell the students the full truth about repressions.
      --------

      Remembering Stalin's Great Purge victims
      www.russiatoday.com, October 30, 2009

      On Friday, Russia marks the Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Political Repressions. Millions suffered from Stalin's repressions from the 1920s through to the 1950s.
      Memorial services have been held across the country.
      Ahead of the day, President Medvedev said attempts to justify the Stalinist repressions under the pretext of state interest are unacceptable:
      "I am convinced that no development of a country, no success or ambitions of the state, should be achieved through human grief and loss. Nothing can be valued above human life, and there is no excuse for repression."
      Meanwhile on Thursday, Russia's civil rights group "Memorial" organized a rally in central Moscow to remember those executed in the Russian capital between 1937 and 1938. A large crowd gathered throughout the day in the heart of Moscow, lighting candles and reading out a roll-call of names of more than 30,000 people who perished at that time.
      Every person who was in attendance has a personal reason to be there.
      "My father was a doctor, he was arrested in 1934. For decades they told us he was alive in a prison camp, and then in Khrushchev times he was rehabilitated. We discovered he had been executed – shot dead in 1938," a participant of the rally told RT.
      Mass graves for more than 20,000 bodies were discovered just outside Moscow at the Butovo polygon. A few years ago, a church was founded there in remembrance of the politically repressed. Father Kirill heads the clergy, and says it was his calling, as his grandfather was shot there – a Christian who, like many others, refused to renounce his beliefs.
      "The Soviet Union punished religion with executions. This place is unique – 300 priests killed here were later canonized. Not only Christians were shot, but also Muslims and Jews. All religions were equal in the face of death in Stalin times," Father Kirill said.
      In the 1990s, Russian security services opened some of the Soviet secret files. It was discovered that not only were the intelligentsia– i.e. scientists, teachers, high-ranking officials and other figures who had allegedly questioned Stalin's power – killed, but also many ordinary people. Hundreds of thousands more were sent to die in gulag prison camps.
      "KGB archives state that about 4.5 million people were repressed in the Soviet era, while more than 800,000 were executed. Only 3,000 death penalties were handed out after the Stalin era. Once his cult of personality was destroyed, more than 75% were rehabilitated posthumously," said Dr Viktor Zemskov, a historian from the Russian Academy of Sciences.
      The Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Political Repressions has been commemorated in Russia since 1991. The civil rights group "Memorial" leads the drive to remember.
      "Russia should build a civil society. Every one of us should stop focusing solely on our individual benefits. Only then can we prevent further tragedies like the Great Purge," believes Anna Karetnikova from Memorial.
      Late into the evening, people continued coming to Moscow's Lubyanka Square despite the bad weather, reading name after name of those who were victims of Stalin's Great Purge, making sure it is never forgotten and that history does not repeat itself.
      Fact box
      From the 1920s through to the 1950s in the Soviet Union
      52 million political sentences were passed
      6 million people were deported without sentence
      1 million people were executed
      (From "The History of Stalin's Gulag", a collection of documents in seven volumes, 2005)
      --------

      RIA Novosti denies mounting PR campaign to improve Stalin's image
      RIA Novosti, October 30, 2009

      MOSCOW, October 30 (RIA Novosti) - RIA Novosti on Friday strongly denied allegations it had teamed up with a Western PR company "to justify Russia's great power ambitions and improve the image of Joseph Stalin."
      On October 26, EUobserver.com published an article entitled "New pro-Russia campaign comes to EU capital," alleging the Russian news agency had teamed up with a consultancy firm called RJI Companies and "is trying to recruit one of the top 10 PR firms in Brussels to put the project in play."
      "Utter rubbish. The author of the article did indeed ask me about plans concerning RIA Novosti's cooperation with the RJI company. For about 40 minutes, I talked about the development of conference-related activities in the framework of the Valdai discussion club and the agency's other projects. The upshot was just a brief quote that absolutely does not reflect the essence of my explanations to the EUobserver.com journalist. This alone shows the author's fundamental bias and his obvious lack of professionalism," said Valery Levchenko, RIA Novosti deputy general director.
      The text of the article shows that the EUobserver.com journalist lumped together everything, including rumors, that he had managed to gather about RIA Novosti's activities abroad.
      RIA Novosti has not launched any new project on Russia's image; the agency conducts its current activities with the aim of holding a variety of news and expert events in foreign countries and the former Soviet Union, as well as in Russia. This activity includes the organization and conduct of conferences and forums, various media activities, and the active development of Internet sites in 14 foreign languages.
      The agency does indeed intend to implement a number of the projects mentioned in the article. For example, in December, Jordan will host a conference on security in the Middle East under the brand name of the Valdai International Discussion Club, in which experts from Russia, regional states and a number of Western countries will participate. Furthermore, in February 2010, RIA Novosti plans to hold a major international conference on the Arctic in Moscow.
      The RJI PR company mentioned in the article is indeed RIA Novosti's partner in organizing a number of activities abroad, in particular, in Jordan, as well as in the distribution in 16 states of the Middle East of the Arabic-language edition of the Moscow News weekly (Anba Moscou), whose publication the agency has resumed after a 17-year hiatus.
      We have grounds to believe that because of his low professionalism and the limited information he has about Russia, the EUobserver.com journalist mistook next week's planned launch of Anba Moscou in the majority of Arab states for the start of some new project to improve our country's image abroad.
      What is especially cynical is that the disinformation campaign against RIA Novosti was started just before Remembrance Day for Victims of Political Repression - a very sensitive date for our country, in connection with which Russian President Dmitry Medvedev stressed the impermissibility of any attempts to justify Stalin-era reprisals under the guise of restoring historical justice.
      Unfortunately, unprofessional and irresponsible allegations like those in the EUobserver.com article, based on unverified and obviously false information, erode the trust and mutual understanding between countries and peoples, and create new information barriers.
      "It's a pity that those media outlets that picked up the article in question and delivered it to their audiences did not bother to fulfill their journalistic duty - to check the facts and ask RIA Novosti for comment," Levchenko said.
      ------

      Putin urges victims of political repression be commemorated
      RIA Novosti, October 30, 2009

      MOSCOW, October 30 (RIA Novosti) - Russian President Vladimir Putin said Monday that victims of political repression should be commemorated so that no one will be tempted to resurrect past practices.
      Russia remembers past victims of political repression on October 30 each year. The Day of Soviet Political Prisoners was first commemorated in 1974, and became a day dedicated to the memory of those who suffered following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.
      Putin said that government and law enforcement agencies should make every effort to identify all the victims of repression.
      "Today we commemorate the victims of political repression," Putin told a Cabinet meeting. "Above all, law enforcement agencies should provide the public with all relevant information that can be used in their rehabilitation."
      Some 1.5 million people fell victim to Soviet political terror, and their names have been included on the Internet as part of the day's remembrances.
      --------

      Police Detain Suspect in Multiple Vandalism of Cemetery
      UCSJ, October 30, 2009

      Police in Bogorodsk, Russia (Nizhny Novgorod region) detained a man
      suspected of vandalizing a local cemetery multiple times, according to
      an October 29, 2009 article in the local supplement to the national
      daily "Komsomolskaya Pravda." In September and October, someone
      smashed a total of 74 gravestones at the cemetery and painted
      swastikas and Stars of David on some of them. Police reportedly caught
      the 25-year-old suspect in the act of vandalizing gravestones again at
      the same cemetery. The article reported that he has a record of mental
      illness.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/police-detain-suspect-multiple-vandalism-of-cemetery
      ------

      Petersburg University Student Fined for Racist, Antisemitic Leaflets
      UCSJ, October 30, 2009

      A court in St. Petersburg, Russia fined a university student for
      posting antisemitic and racist leaflets on the city's metro, according
      to an October 29, 2009 report by the Sova Information-Analytical
      Center. Sergey Orlov was charged under Article 282 of the Criminal
      Code, which prohibits incitement of ethnic or religious hatred.
      Prosecutors plan to appeal the verdict, which they considered too
      lenient.

      http://www.ucsj.org/news/petersburg-university-student-fined-racist-antisemitic-leaflets
      ------

      Medvedev blasts Stalin defenders
      By: Richard Galpin
      BBC News, October 30, 2009

      Russian President Dmitry Medvedev has made an outspoken attack on those seeking to rehabilitate former Soviet leader Joseph Stalin.
      Millions of Soviet citizens died under Stalin's rule and Mr Medvedev said it was not possible to justify those who exterminated their own people.
      He also warned against efforts to falsify history and defend repression.
      Some Russian politicians have recently tried to portray Stalin in a more positive light.
      Under President Medvedev's predecessor, current Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, Stalin was often promoted as an efficient leader who turned the Soviet Union into a superpower.
      Brutal regime
      Mr Medvedev made the unusually critical comments in a videoblog posted on the Kremlin's website.
      It appeared on the day the country is supposed to honour millions of people killed under Stalin's brutal regime which lasted from the late 1920s until his death in 1953.
      Mr Medvedev said it was impossible to imagine the scale of repression under Stalin when whole groups of people were eliminated and even stripped of their right to be buried.
      The president said there were now attempts to justify the repression of the past, and he warned against the falsification of history.
      All this flies in the face of the current trend to promote Stalin as an effective manager and a leader who transformed the Soviet Union.
      Under Mr Putin, the order was given for school history books to be re-written, highlighting Stalin's achievements.
      In Moscow there is now even a Stalin-themed cafe and a metro station with one of Stalin's famous slogans on its walls. In northern Russia a historian investigating crimes committed by the former Soviet dictator was recently arrested.
      It would appear there is a split within the Russian leadership on this highly sensitive issue.

      http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/europe/8334009.stm
      --------

      NASHI SUES FOUR FOREIGN PAPERS FOR LIBEL
      Bigotry Monitor-UCSJ's weekly newsletter, Volume 9, Number 41, October 30, 2009

      Nashi has filed libel suits against four foreign newspapers for reports comparing the pro-Kremlin youth group to Hitler youth and calling its members bandits and nationalists, "The Moscow Times" reported on October 26. The reports were published in late September and early October in London's "Independent," France's "Le Monde" and "Le Journal Du Dimanche," and Germany's "Frankfurter Rundschau." The subject was Nashi's intimidation campaign against journalist and human rights activist Alexander Podrabinek for his criticism of World War II veterans. Nashi demands retractions of the phrases it deems offensive and damages of 500,000 rubles ($17,260) from each of the newspapers, the group's lawyer, Sergei Zhorin, told "The Moscow Times."
      "The Times" noted that Nashi is believed to be the brainchild of Kremlin first deputy chief of staff, Vladislav Surkov, and it reportedly began its campaign against Podrabinek, a Soviet-era dissident, after a meeting between Nashi leaders and Surkov. "Nashi activists have been staging near-daily demonstrations outside Podrabinek's Moscow apartment building and have called for his expulsion from Russia after he suggested in an article that members of the Moscow Union of Veterans were former "camp guards" and "executioners" for pressuring a Moscow restaurant into changing its name from `Antisovetskaya' (Anti-Soviet) to `Sovetskaya.'"
      Last week, Ella Pamfilova, the head of the Kremlin's human rights council, sharply criticized the government's youth policy, which she said set up privileged groups whose members served as political pawns. "You must not divide the young into `ours' and `not ours' … and allow some to do practically everything while hampering the development of others," she told reporters on October 15. Nashi activists and United Russia deputies had called for Pamfilova's dismissal after she condemned Nashi for "persecuting" Podrabinek.
      Pamfilova urged the government to change its youth policy. "It is very bad when young people get euphoric and break the law because they have support from senior government figures," she said. She added that government policies prompted the radical posture of many youth movements. "This is inadmissible," she said.

      http://www.ucsj.org/bigotry-monitor/volume-9-2009/volume-9-number-41-october-30-2009
      ---------

      Digest
      Washington Post, October 31, 2009

      Medvedev condemns whitewashing of Stalin: Russian President Dmitry Medvedev said he was concerned that most young Russians were unaware of the scope of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin's purges and said past crimes should not be forgiven. It is important "not to allow the restoration of historical truth to be used as a pretext to rehabilitate those responsible for exterminating their own people," he said.
      -------

      Zyuganov: Stalin's role in Soviet history should not be reduced to repressions
      Interfax, October 31, 2009

      Moscow, October 31 (Interfax) - In analyzing Joseph Stalin's role in the Soviet Union's history, it is wrong to concentrate only on the period of mass repressions, Russian Communist Party leader Gennady Zyuganov said.
      "I am extremely alarmed by someone's attempts to reduce everything in this issue to two or three years of Soviet history," Zyuganov told journalists in reply to a question from Interfax on Saturday.
      Zyuganov said he did not hear the full version of President Dmitry Medvedev's Friday address on the occasion of the Day of Memory of the Victims of Political Repressions, but said he did not approve of paying so much attention to one or two years in the country's history. "I would advise all Russian leaders not to reduce everything to the tragedy of this or that year in the Soviet country's history," he said.
      Stalin led the Soviet Union for three decades, Zyuganov said. "Lenin and Stalin received a country torn by WWI and the Civil Wars and managed to bring it together, and it turned into a mighty world power in just a few years under Stalin," Zyuganov said.
      The Communist Party plans a series of events to mark the 130th anniversary of Stalin's birth on December 21, 2009, Zyuganov said. "We will hold a ceremonial meeting in Moscow on December 21 or on the Sunday before the date," Zyuganov said.
      The party also plans to organize a series of scientific conferences and roundtable meetings to discuss Stalin's role in the USSR's history, Zyuganov said.
      The Communist Party has also established an advisory council comprising former Soviet ministers, major scientists, and other specialists in various fields, Zyuganov said. "We will put all memorial places related to Stalin's name in order and will award a commemorative medal issued by our party to this date to a large number of veterans," he said.
      Zyuganov also mentioned the TV project The Name of Russia conducted recently by one of Russia's federal TV channels. "Lenin and Stalin topped all the polls then," he said.
      ---------

      October, 2009 Monthly Summary
      Sova Center, November 2, 2009

      In October, 2009, not less than 12 people, including a fatality, became victims of racist and neo-nazi motivated violence in Russia. Besides Moscow, such incidents took place in Kirov and Sverdlovsk regions. In October, 2008, 7 people were murdered and not less than 20 more injured.
      In all, from the beginning of the year in 36 regions of Russia, as a result of racist and neo-nazi motivated attacks, not less than 50 people were murdered and not less than 280 were injured. In the same period of time, in 2008, 99 people died and not less than 399 were injured.
      In October, not less than 5 acts of vandalism took place in 4 regions of Russia. In all, from the beginning of the year we have registered not less than 83 cases of ideologically and racially motivated vandalism, including 9 arson attacks.
      In particular, there were 34 cases of ideologically motivated vandalism, 20 anti-Jewish actions, 13 anti-Orthodox, 6 anti-Muslim, 4 anti-Armenian, 4 anti-Protestant and one episode against each of Catholic and New Religious Movements' buildings.
      In October, the Federal List of the Extremist Materials was enlarged 3 times (on October 5, 28 and 30) by paragraphs 432-449. Thus by November, 1 the Federal List consists of 449 paragraphs 15 of which were included twice and one three times. The decisions to rate 6 of those 15 materials as extremist ones were cancelled by different courts.
      In October, there were not less than 4 guilty verdicts issued for violent hate crimes, 2 in Moscow, one in Moscow region and one in Orenburg. 15 people were convicted, 2 of them were released from their punishment due to reconciliation of the sides in the court. In all, from the beginning of the year maximum of guilty verdicts in history has been reached, namely 38 trials related to racist violent crimes were ended so. 117 people were convicted, including 27 who got suspended sentences or were released from punishment for different reasons. The preceding maximum was 36 guilty verdicts for violent hate crimes issued over the whole year in 2008.
      There were 3 guilty verdicts for xenophobic propaganda against 4 people in Nizhny Novgorod, Omsk and St. Petersburg in October.
      In all, from the beginning of the year, there were 32 guilty verdicts for xenophobic propaganda (article 282 of the Criminal Code) against 44 people, including 20 who got suspended sentences.
      The prevailing phenomenon in the field of unlawful implementation of the anti-extremist legislation is the persecution of Jehovah Witnesses in different parts of Russia.

      http://xeno.sova-center.ru/6BA2468/6BB41EE/DD64253
      =================

      II. SURVEYS, ANALYSES, COMMENTS

      Russian historians fear crackdown on sensitive research
      By: Alexander Osipovich
      AFP, October 16, 2009

      MOSCOW When the police stopped Mikhail Suprun's car last month, he did not expect to be questioned over his research into mass deportations that took place in Russia more than six decades ago.
      But Suprun, a history professor in the northern Russian city of Arkhangelsk, discovered that his research into the 1940s deportations had drawn the interest of the FSB, the successor agency to the Soviet-era KGB.
      Briefly detained by the<br/><br/>(Message over 64 KB, truncated)
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.