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1414Bulletin 7:25 (2013)

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      THE RUSSIAN NATIONALISM BULLETIN
      A Biweekly Newsletter of Current Affairs
      Vol. 7, No. 25(213), 3 May 2014
      Compilers: Parikrama Gupta, Daria Maliutina, Vildane Oezkan & Andreas Umland
      https://ukma.academia.edu/AndreasUmland/Posts/2035175/p--span-THE-RUSSIAN-NATIONALISM-BULLETIN-br-A-Biweekly-Newsletter-of-Current-Affairs-br-Vol.-7-No.-2

       

      I NEWS: 1 - 15 November 2013
      II SURVEYS, ANALYSES, COMMENTS
      III ANNOTATIONS OF RECENT PUBLICATIONS

      [NOTE: When quoting from an article found here, please, mention the RNB, as the source. Thank you!]
      ==============================


      I NEWS: 1 - 15 November 2013

      Spartak offer reward to find swastika-waving fans

      The Moscow News, November 1, 2013

       

      Spartak Moscow offered a reward Friday for information on fans who displayed a Nazi swastika flag at their last match.

      The incident at Wednesday’s cup game with second-tier Shinnik Yaroslavl occurred on the same day as UEFA handed a partial stadium ban to CSKA Moscow for “racist behavior” of their fans at a Champions League game.

      In a website appeal to find the “unknown provocateurs” who displayed the Nazi flag in a section occupied by Spartak fans, the club said: “We address everyone who has trustworthy information about the individuals who committed this criminal offense with a request to present it to Spartak Moscow FC’s security service.”

      “A reward is guaranteed.”

      Photographs of the incident posted on Spartak's website appear to show the swastika flag being held by one man, while those around him, who are mostly wearing Spartak colors, do not seem to object.

      The match between Spartak and Shinnik was marred by repeated crowd trouble, with 78 arrests made after brawls between rival fans and police.

      During the second half, the match was stopped for almost half an hour as police used water cannon against fans who were ripping up seats and hurling them at officers. Spartak eventually won 1-0 thanks to a Dmitry Kombarov penalty.

      On Thursday, Spartak said authorities in the city of Yaroslavl were “unprepared” to deal with trouble and insisted those waving the swastika flag "have no relation whatsoever to Spartak supporters."

      Shinnik have placed the blame firmly on Spartak, issuing a statement thanking the home fans for their support, while noting that: “Not all of our guests, the fans of the team from the capital, behaved themselves properly.”

      The hard core of Spartak's supporters is notoriously ultra-nationalist. Police have vowed to probe the fighting and swastika incidents.

      The Russian FA statutes could see Spartak receive a home stadium ban of up to three matches over the unrest; while European governing body UEFA could also take action. An FA disciplinary meeting is expected Friday.

      Russia over the summer introduced legislation from President Vladimir Putin aimed at curbing misbehavior at sports events, with the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics and the 2018 football World Cup on the horizon.

      The so-called Fan Law comes into effect on January 19, 2014. There have been more than 14,000 offenses committed at Russian sporting events over the last three years, according to Sports Ministry figures.

       

      http://themoscownews.com/sports/20131101/192021511/Spartak-offer-reward-to-find-swastika-waving-fans.html

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      More Moscow officials sacked after anti-migrant protests

      The Moscow News, November 1, 2013

       

      Two more Moscow government officials were sacked by the Russian capital’s mayor on Friday nearly two weeks after violent anti-migrant protests in a Moscow suburb, sparked by a fatal stabbing.

      Mayor Sergei Sobyanin fired Georgy Smoleevsky, the prefect of the capital's southern district, and Viktor Legavin, the head of administration in Moscow’s Western Biryulyovo district that was the scene of violent nationalist riots.

      Sobyanin said the dismissals were linked to violations found during the ensuing police raids on a local vegetable warehouse and the Sadovod market on the southeastern outskirts of Moscow. Police said the operation at Sadovod market appeared to have found illegal sales of alcohol and counterfeit goods.

      Earlier this week, a number of senior Interior Ministry officials, including Alexander Podolny, the police chief of Moscow’s southern district, and Gennady Kaverin, the head of the Western Biryulyovo police department, were fired by President Vladimir Putin over the protests.

      Sobyanin also reprimanded Vladimir Zotov, the prefect of the neighboring south-eastern district, over the riots and ordered him to tighten control over his territory and report violations to the mayor.

      Moscow’s entire police force was temporarily put on alert and nearly 400 people were arrested during massive anti-migrant protests in the Biryulyovo neighborhood on October 13. The riot occurred just days an Azerbaijani migrant allegedly killed a 25-year-old ethnic Russian, police said.

      Hours after the riots, police arrested over 1,200 migrant workers in a raid on a local vegetable warehouse, starting off a major ongoing crackdown on illegal migrants in the capital.

       

      http://themoscownews.com/local/20131101/192021236/More-Moscow-officials-sacked-after-anti-migrant-protests.html

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      Bishop: ethnic Russians discriminated against in south Russia

      Johnson’s Russia List, November 3, 2013

       

      MOSCOW. Oct 31 (Interfax) – A senior Russian Orthodox bishop has claimed that Russian speakers “often suffer ethnic and religious discrimination” in regions in Russia’s North Caucasus where they are in the minority.

      “We are used to thinking that it is only smaller ethnic groups that need protection. That is not true. In many of the republics (of Russia), Russians form minorities, which often suffer ethnic and religious discrimination,” Metropolitan Kirill of Stavropol and Nevinnomyssk and head of the synodal committee for liaison with the Cossack community, told a meeting in Moscow on Thursday of the World Russian People’s Council.

      “Uncontrolled processes of migration, ethnic conflicts that are often artificially portrayed as trivial rows, lack of jobs, and low education and healthcare standards force Russian speakers to leave their homes and move to other regions,” Kirill said.

      “It is important to realize that the solution of burning problems that beset Russians in the Caucasus will give an impetus to the development and peaceful existence of the other ethnic groups,” he said.

      He criticized people vested with authority – “what they have received their high office from the state for, is not to hide from their voters and their problems, but, to address them.”

      He also said the Orthodox Church would boycott a planned “Congress of Slavs” in Stavropol on Saturday. There are many “pagans” in the region and some of them will attend the congress, he said. Moreover, there will also be nationalists there, some of them from Ukraine, the metropolitan said.

       

      http://russialist.org/bishop-ethnic-russians-discriminated-against-in-south-russia/

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      Interfax: Russia is guarantor of multipolar world, family values – World Russian People’s Assembly

      Johnson’s Russia List, November 5, 2013

       

      MOSCOW. Nov 3 (Interfax) – The World Russian People’s Assembly sees Russia as the main guarantor of the multipolar world.

      “It is Russia that plays the role of key guarantor of the multipolar world, restraining the ambitions of those who claim the role of global domination,” it said in the final document of its congress held in Moscow.

      Also, there is every reason to consider Russia “the global stronghold of traditional family values, that keeps rebuffing the aggressive preaching of immorality and legalization of a growing range of sinful deeds, it said.

      An incessant economic race and continuing struggle for resources are pushing mankind from one military conflict to another, “all of which may ultimately end up in a confrontation between civilizations.”

      “In such a setting, people and life itself are prompting us to create a society sealed by solidarity. The creative efforts being made by the Russian intellectual class and by our humanitarian and administrative elite, must be channeled into a search for social, economic and political mechanisms that will direct development towards public solidarity, excluding the permanent conflict and forced suppression of individual activity,” the document says.

      Consolidated around the basic values, the moral majority has every right to create its own social model on their basis, “disregarding attacks from the aggressive minority, who deny the ideals and values, guided by their exclusive intellectual and spiritual pride,” it says.

      “This social model should rest on responses to the challenges of inequality and social injustice, demonstrating our ability to overcome them as we implement the idea of a social state and enhance citizens’ living standards,” it said.

      The World Russian People’s Assembly is an international public organization, set up in 1993. Its meetings are attended by representatives of all branches of authority, public organizations and law enforcement agencies, by the supreme leaders of Russia’s traditional religions, teachers and students, scientists and cultural figures. It is headed by the Russian patriarch.

       

      http://russialist.org/interfax-russia-is-guarantor-of-multipolar-world-family-values-world-russian-peoples-assembly/

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      RIA Novosti: Putin Gets Orthodox Award for Boosting Russia’s Global Role

      Johnson's Russia List, November 6, 2013

       

      MOSCOW, November 4 (RIA Novosti) ­ The head of the Russian Orthodox Church on Monday awarded Vladimir Putin with a prize in recognition of the president’s policies intended to make Russia a leading world power.

      The award was established this year by the World Russian People’s Council, a public organization under the aegis of the Russian Orthodox Church.

      Patriarch of Moscow and All Russia Kirill, who chairs the council, said the prize was to honor Putin’s efforts to turn Russia into “a powerful and strong country that has self-respect and is respected by others.”

      The World Russian People’s Council, which has existed since 1993, is described by its organizers as one of the biggest international public forums playing an important part in forming Russia’s civil society.

      This year, it gathered on Russia’s National Unity Day, a holiday introduced by the Kremlin in 2005 to mark the liberation of Russia from Polish invaders in 1612. It replaced the communist holiday of November 7 that celebrated the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution.

       

      http://russialist.org/ria-novosti-putin-gets-orthodox-award-for-boosting-russias-global-role/

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      Moscow MP urges to school ban on Muslim head veils

      Interfax-Religion, November 7, 2013

       

      Moscow, November 7, Interfax - Municipal deputy of the Yakimanka District Dmitry Zakharov is going to address Moscow mayor Sergey Sobyanin with a request to ban wearing hijab in city. The author of the initiative answers the questions. 
      "I believe it is not right for any religious formation to demand special attitude. In fact, hijab is outer manifestation of such demand. It's no good, I think we need to ban wearing it in public places: in the streets, in state and educational establishments," Zakharov said in his interview published by the Metro daily.
      He notes that even in such Islamic countries as Tunisia and Algeria hijab is banned in state institutions and schools.
      "We'd better follow this example today or we'll have even greater problems in the future. Hijab is only commencing the cultural expansion," the MP believes. 
      According to him, hijab will prevent people from integration.
      "For instance, if a girl wears hijab to school, it's more likely that girls in her class won't communicate with her. And even more likely, she won't be able to communicate with the boys there. So after graduation we will get an alien, rather than a child integrated in the society," Zakharov said.

       

      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=10881

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      Attempt to link Russia-EU visa talks with position of sexual minorities absurd - diplomatic source

      Interfax-Religion, November 7, 2013

       

      Moscow, November 7, Interfax - The statement of the Dutch foreign minister about the position of sexual minorities in Russia and the impact of the issue on the talks between Russia and the European Union on visas borders on the absurd, a source at the Russian Foreign Ministry has said.
      "Naturally we have noticed this statement from the Dutch minister that not only contradicts the understandings reached with the EU in the course of work on the agreement of visa-free travels but borders on the absurd," the source told Interfax.
      If this logic apparently stemming from a peculiar understanding of freedom is followed, one can come to linking the course of the talks on visa-free travels with the legalization of drugs or pedophilia, the source said.

       

      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=10879

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      Putin Tells Zhirinovsky to ‘Tone it Down’

      Moscow Times,  November 7, 2013

       

      President Vladimir Putin has urged Liberal Democratic Party leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky to show more restraint in his speeches, most likely in reference to the lawmaker’s recent remarks about the North Caucasus that provoked outrage in the region.

      Zhirinovsky said during a television show last month that the North Caucasus should be surrounded with a barbed wire fence and that a tax should be imposed on its residents if they have a third child.

      “You have a loyal electorate, which has been formed over two decades, and I don’t think you need to appeal to a specific part of your electorate to strengthen your position at the expense of our country’s fundamental interests,” Putin told Zhirinovsky in a meeting Wednesday, according to transcripts on the Kremlin’s website.

      During the meeting, Zhirinovsky proposed placing greater responsibility on employers hiring migrant workers and tightening control over yearly government quotas for foreign employees.

      The government this week authorized the distribution of more than 1.6 million work permits for foreigners, including more than 275,000 unskilled laborers, in 2014.

      But employers must “first hire only our citizens,” Zhirinovsky said. “Or there must be conditions: There must be a workers’ dormitory, health service, regular pay, maybe even cultural recreation ­ take them to museums ­ so that it’s not profitable for the employer to bring in laborers” from abroad.

      Putin said that Zhirinovsky’s suggestions were “viable” and that they reflected many other countries’ migration policies.

      The key to safeguarding Russia’s interests is for “everyone to observe the law,” and to ensure that migrants show unconditional respect for the laws, customs, and cultures of the regions they want to settle in, Putin said.

      However, it was unclear whether Putin planned to amend migration laws to help meet these requirements. While the Kremlin’s transcript shows that Putin spoke in favor of tightening Russian migration laws, Interfax reported that Putin opposed adjusting existing laws during Wednesday’s meeting.

       

      http://russialist.org/putin-tells-zhirinovsky-to-tone-it-down/

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      Interfax: Russian Olympic Committee says gay hysteria over Sochi Games ‘whipped up’

      Interfax, November 8, 2013

       

      The Russian Olympic Committee thinks the scandal around the sportsmen of non-traditional sexual orientation is artificially whipped up, while the athletes themselves will be taken up with a competition, not political issues.

      “I think that is just the whipping up of the atmosphere around the Olympics on purpose; when the Games start, the athletes will have no time to think about anything else, they will live with the Games. When you come to perform and, moreover, to win, you are preoccupied with completely different thoughts,” the honorary vice-president of the Russian Olympic Committee, Vladimir Vasin, told Interfax news agency on Friday.

      Answering the question on the possible attempts of some Games participants to unfurl a flag of the LGBT community at the opening and closing ceremonies of the Sochi Olympics, Vasin said:

      “I don’t think something alike will take place. We received no such appeals.” Vasin recalled that the Russian side has provided the corresponding guarantees of personal privacy for the Games participants. “As far as the guarantees from the Russian side are concerned, they were voiced earlier, that is each person’s private business,” he said.

       

      http://russialist.org/interfax-russian-olympic-committee-says-gay-hysteria-over-sochi-games-whipped-up/

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      Gays who decide to move abroad will have hard time – State Duma

      Interfax, November 6, 2013

       

      The State Duma has criticized the statement made by the Dutch foreign minister on the readiness of the Netherlands to provide asylum to Russian homosexuals.

      “Such statements are bad propaganda against the Russian Federation. I don’t see anything else in that,” Yelena Afanasyeva, deputy chairman of the State Duma committee on labor, social policy and veterans’ affairs, who is one of the authors of the Dima Yakovlev law, told Interfax on Wednesday, commenting on the statement made by Dutch Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans who said the Netherlands could give asylum to Russian citizens who are persecuted under the law on gay propaganda.

      “It would be wrong to speak about one’s sexual orientation at every corner, and the statement made by the Dutch foreign minister encourages people top speak openly about that,” the parliamentarian said.

      “Why? I am not interested in my neighbors’ private life to this extent. They are adults and they do what they want. The main thing is that they are decent,” she said.

      People who keep talking about this engage in personal PR, Afanasyeva said. “They want to work with Europe and they badmouth our country. It’s wrong and unfair,” she said.

      The parliamentarian also cautioned people who want to move abroad, saying they may be disappointed.

      “Judging by my talks with emigrants, they want to return home, euphoria passes. Many people who leave have the wrong idea that they will not work in their new country and will live on welfare, but sooner or later their benefits are reduced or stop,” Afanasyeva said.

       

      http://russialist.org/gays-who-decide-to-move-abroad-will-have-hard-time-state-duma/

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      50% of Russians think Russia's president must not profess any other religion except Orthodox – poll

      Interfax-Religion, November 11, 2013

       

      Moscow, November 11, Interfax - About 28% of Russian citizens do not object to the idea of restoring the monarchy, said VTsIOM pollster General Director Valery Fyodorov.
      "Twenty-eight percent of the respondents polled in March supported this idea, or, at least, do not object to it. But no one in this group is an active proponent of the monarchy, as no one sees who could actually fit the role of the monarch," Fyodorov said at a conference at the Manege exhibition center, dedicated to the 400th anniversary of the Romanov dynasty.
      Thirteen percent of those polled said a Russian politician could assume the role of monarch following election in a referendum, or at a national assembly. Only 6% of those surveyed said a representative of the House of Romanov, the last royal dynasty in Russia, could become Russia's monarch.
      Fyodorov also said that 50% of respondents think Russia's president must not profess any other religion except Orthodox, 14% said he could and 29% said this is of no importance.
      The 12th church and public exhibition and forum, "Orthodox Russia and National Unity Day. The House of Romanov," is to last until November 19.
      Russian Cinematographers Union President Nikita Mikhalkov said he was unpleasantly surprised to learn that many of the Russian citizens hail the birth of an heir to the throne in Britain.
      "It's the countries that deprived our royal house of an heir! What a shallow way of thinking! How obviously missing the national awareness is in the minds of our contemporaries to rejoice at this!" Mikhalkov said.
      He said the 1990s in Russia's history must be given a special assessment. "We must give an assessment to what happened to Russia in the 1990s without going screamy or hysterical, and without taking to the streets. We must acknowledge that it was a catastrophe. A crime committed. Whether by accident, or design. We can see today that farming and industrial production were destroyed, and a huge number of military enterprises fell into private hands," Mikhalkov said.
      Culture Minister Vladimir Medinsky proposed inviting opposition politicians to the exhibition.
      "I think special courses should be organized for politicians, especially beginners, first of all those who want to hold rallies and start everything from scratch. The exhibition carries an enormous political and philosophical message in this respect," he said.
      A poll to find out what Russian citizens think about the idea of restoring the monarchy was conducted in March 2013. A report released then says that 70% of respondents see this as either impossible, or wrong.
      Sixty-seven percent of those surveyed oppose the monarchy and said that autocracy is a thing of the past in Russia. Asked to choose between monarchy and the republic, 11% said they would prefer monarchy, but 82% said the current republican form of government is the best for the Russian state.
      Meanwhile, even respondents who are loyal to the idea of restoring the monarchy as a form of government, said they do not see who could actually claim the monarch's role, and their percentage has grown from 19% to 24% over the past six years. Asked to improvise on the theme, respondents said hypothetical candidates could be chosen from among public figures or politicians (13%), rather than among Russia's royal descendants (6%), according to VTsIOM.
      Another poll, conducted by the Levada Center pollster in May 2013, suggests that 10% of Russians want the monarchy to be restored and 76% oppose this idea, while 14% were undecided.

       

      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=10889

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      Interfax: Over a quarter of Russians don’t object to restoration of monarchy – poll

      Johnson's Russia List, November 11, 2013

       

      MOSCOW. Nov 10 (Interfax) – About 28% of Russian citizens do not object to the idea of restoring the monarchy, said VTSIOM pollster General Director Valery Fyodorov.

      “Twenty-eight percent of the respondents polled in March supported this idea, or, at least, do not object to it. But no one in this group is an active proponent of the monarchy, as no one sees who could actually fit the role of the monarch,” Fyodorov said at a conference at the Manege exhibition center, dedicated to the 400th anniversary of the Romanov dynasty.

      Thirteen percent of those polled said a Russian politician could assume the role of monarch following election in a referendum, or at a national assembly. Only 6% of those surveyed said a representative of the House of Romanov, the last royal dynasty in Russia, could become Russia’s monarch.

      Fyodorov also said that 50% of respondents think Russia’s president must not profess any other religion except Orthodox, 14% said he could and 29% said this is of no importance.

      The 12th church and public exhibition and forum, “Orthodox Russia and National Unity Day. The House of Romanov,” is to last until November 19.

      Russian Cinematographers Union President Nikita Mikhalkov said he was unpleasantly surprised to learn that many of the Russian citizens hail the birth of an heir to the throne in Britain.

      “It’s the countries that deprived our royal house of an heir! What a shallow way of thinking! How obviously missing the national awareness is in the minds of our contemporaries to rejoice at this!” Mikhalkov said.

      He said the 1990s in Russia’s history must be given a special assessment. “We must give an assessment to what happened to Russia in the 1990s without going screamy or hysterical, and without taking to the streets. We must acknowledge that it was a catastrophe. A crime committed. Whether by accident, or design. We can see today that farming and industrial production were destroyed, and a huge number of military enterprises fell into private hands,” Mikhalkov said.

      Culture Minister Vladimir Medinsky proposed inviting opposition politicians to the exhibition.

      “I think special courses should be organized for politicians, especially beginners, first of all those who want to hold rallies and start everything from scratch. The exhibition carries an enormous political and philosophical message in this respect,” he said.

      A poll to find out what Russian citizens think about the idea of restoring the monarchy was conducted in March 2013. A report released then says that 70% of respondents see this as either impossible, or wrong.

      Sixty-seven percent of those surveyed oppose the monarchy and said that autocracy is a thing of the past in Russia. Asked to choose between monarchy and the republic, 11% said they would prefer monarchy, but 82% said the current republican form of government is the best for the Russian state.

      Meanwhile, even respondents who are loyal to the idea of restoring the monarchy as a form of government, said they do not see who could actually claim the monarch’s role, and their percentage has grown from 19% to 24% over the past six years. Asked to improvise on the theme, respondents said hypothetical candidates could be chosen from among public figures or politicians (13%), rather than among Russia’s royal descendants (6%), according to VTSIOM.

      Another poll, conducted by the Levada Center pollster in May 2013, suggests that 10% of Russians want the monarchy to be restored and 76% oppose this idea, while 14% were undecided.

       

      http://russialist.org/interfax-over-a-quarter-of-russians-dont-object-to-restoration-of-monarchy-poll/

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      Russian police dismiss ‘SS helmet’ controversy at football match

      The Moscow News, November 11, 2013

       

      RIA Novosti – Russian police denied Monday that one of their officers wore a helmet featuring the logo of the Nazi SS to oversee a match where fans displayed a swastika flag.

      Spartak Moscow’s 1-0 Russian Cup win over Shinnik Yaroslavl last month was marred by crowd violence as well as the display of the swastika flag, resulting in stadium bans for both teams.

      In recent days, photographs showing a policeman wearing a helmet apparently labeled with the logo of the SS had gone viral on Russian-language sports websites, but police said it was just the number 44.

      “We found that helmet. It’s all a lot simpler, the number 44 is written on it. That’s the sort of handwriting the person who wrote on it had,” the police department for the city of Yaroslavl wrote on its official Twitter account.

      The police department displayed a photograph of what it said was the helmet in question alongside others bearing the numbers 41 and 42. On all of them, the number 4 was written in a way that bore a passing resemblance to the thunderbolt-style font used in the SS logo.

      The swastika flag is one of a string of racist incidents to hit Eastern European football in recent weeks, following CSKA Moscow’s partial stadium ban for “racist behavior” by their fans in a Champions League game.

      Last week, Ukrainian champions Shakhtar Donetsk condemned individuals who posed in Ku Klux Klan uniforms in front of a team bus. The culprits were not Shakhtar fans, the club said.

       

      http://themoscownews.com/sports/20131111/192042767/Russian-police-dismiss-SS-helmet-controversy-at-football-match.html

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      Interfax: Public Chamber wants certain websites to be checked for xenophobic propaganda

      Johnson's Russia List, November 12, 2013

       

      MOSCOW. Nov 11 (Interfax) – Secretary of the Russian Public Chamber Yevgeny Velikhov has asked head of the federal communications, information technology and mass media oversight service Roskomnadzor Alexander Zharov to check several websites suspected of engaging in the propaganda of xenophobia and racial hatred.

      The websites in question are “Sputnik i Pogrom” and “Pravoviye Novosti”, according to Velikhov’ letter to Zharov.

      “I would like to draw your attention to a number of websites that regularly carry reports that are at odds with the strategic priorities of the state policy of integration in the Eurasian region and with the constitution, and abound in anti-migrant, xenophobic and anti-Caucasus calls and insults,” the letter says.

      These website incite racial, ethnic and linguistic enmity, and provoke ethnic conflicts and extremist sentiment, it says.

      “We would like these websites to be checked and appropriate measures taken if abuses are uncovered,” Velikhov said.

       

      http://russialist.org/interfax-public-chamber-wants-certain-websites-to-be-checked-for-xenophobic-propaganda/

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      Russians believe influence of Orthodox faith on country's development is considerable – poll

      Interfax-Religion, November 13, 2013

       

      Moscow, November 13, Interfax - The majority of Russian citizens admit that the Orthodox Church plays a significant role in the history of the country and believe that the church should exert an influence on the moral life of society without interfering in politics and public administration, a public opinion poll conducted by the All-Russia Public Opinion Research Center (VTsIOM) shows.
      The poll was conducted in 130 populated areas of 42 regions, territories, and republics of Russia on October 26-27. It surveys 1,600 respondents. 
      Forty-six percent of the respondents believe Russia has a state religion and 44% believe this religion is Russian Orthodox Christianity. One percent of the respondents believe this religion is Islam and another one percent believe it is Catholicism. 
      The majority of Russians (56%) believe the Orthodox Church played a significant role in the history of Russia and believe it had a determining influence on the country's development at pivotal moments in history. Twenty-eight percent of the respondents surveyed disagree with that opinion.
      The respondents said that they recognize the influence of the Orthodox Church on Russia's development, and 47% said they believe it was in most cases a positive driving force, whereas nine percent said they believe the Orthodox Church hampered Russia's development. Thirty percent of the respondents said they believe the Orthodox Church did not have any influence on the development of the state.
      Many respondents believe the Russian Orthodox Church has a considerable influence on the spiritual and moral state of society (64% of the respondents said they notice such an influence, whereas 46% of the respondents find this influence to be insignificant.
      The second areas influenced by the Orthodox Church the most is people's everyday life: 17% of the respondents said they believe the church has considerable influence on it, while 39% believe its influence is insignificant (a year ago, the percentage of respondents was 14% and 35%, respectively). 
      The respondents also believe that the Russian Orthodox Church exerts an influence on ethnic relations (15% believe this influence is considerable and 37% find it to be insignificant).
      The respondents believe the Russian Orthodox Church has a lesser degree of influence on domestic policy (11% of the respondents find this influence to be strong and 35% find it insignificant), foreign policy (10% and 32%, respectively), and education (9% and 31%, respectively). 
      The majority of the respondents believe that the church should have an influence on the moral state of society, but should not interfere in politics or public administration. The percentage of respondents who believe that increases every year, having increased from 43% in 2009 to 50% in 2013, the poll shows.
      Thirty percent of the respondents believe that the influence of the Russian Orthodox Church should be limited to religious affairs, while 15% believe that it should be actively involved in discussing and solving problems faced by modern society and the state.
      The majority of the respondents surveyed (64%) said the religious affiliation of the president is important to them. Forty percent believe that it is unacceptable for Russia to have a president whose religion is something other than that of Russian Orthodox Christianity.

       

      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=10896

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      Two Tajik Migrant Workers Found Dead In Russia

      RFE/RL, November 13, 2013

       

      Two Tajik migrant workers have been found dead in Russia's Chelyabinsk Oblast, the victims of a suspected beating.
      The Tajik Embassy in Moscow said on November 13 that the bodies of Abdumanon Sanginboev, 31, and Sairiddin Mutrifov, 22, were found in the town of Kaigorodovo on November 12.
      Officials say their injuries indicated they had been severely beaten.
      Russia's Investigative Committee said that two local men, whose names were not released, were detained as suspects.
      Investigators said the two Tajik migrants may have been killed during an attempt by the two suspects to steal scrap metal.
      Attacks against migrant workers from Central Asia and the Caucasus have increased in Russia in recent weeks after a young Russian man was stabbed to death in October in Moscow, allegedly by a migrant worker from Azerbaijan.

       

      http://www.rferl.org/content/tajik-workers-russia-/25167093.html

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      Suspect Detained In Attack Against Migrant Federation Leader In Moscow

      RFE/RL, November 13, 2013

       

      A woman has been detained in Moscow in connection with the shooting of an Azerbaijani man who serves as the vice chairman of Russia's Federation of Migrants.
      Moscow police said a 24-year-old woman, whose name was not made public, was apprehended on November 12.
      The woman is suspected of being among a group of people who shot and wounded Mais Qurbanov near his apartment building in Moscow on November 11. Qurbanov is currently in the hospital.
      Qurbanov's colleague, Muhammad Amin, said Qurbanov had recently criticized the growing nationalism and xenophobia in Russia. Qurbanov told police that he was shot by a woman.
      Attacks against migrant workers have intensified in Russia lately following the stabbing death of a young Muscovite last month, allegedly by a migrant from Azerbaijan.

       

      http://www.rferl.org/content/migrant-federation-detained/25166937.html

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      Russia did not violate international law by banning homosexuality propaganda among minors - children's ombudsman (updated)

      Interfax-Religion, November 14, 2013

       

      Moscow – Russia did not violate international law by imposing a ban on propaganda of homosexual relations among minors, Russian presidential children's rights envoy Pavel Astakhov says.
      "Propaganda of homosexuality among children violates commonly accepted principles and norms of international law," the envoy's press service quoted him as saying at the international parliamentary forum on 'Constitution. Democracy. Parliamentarianism' on Thursday.
      "An adults' right to the inviolability of their private lives and to freedom of speech and artistic expression should not be turned into the right to deprave children, violate their sexual integrity, and cause harm to their health and their moral and mental development," he said.
      The classical Roman law stipulated that marriage is a union of a man and a woman, he said.
      "The Roman Republic, which knew quite a variety of forms of relationships and unions, withstood the temptation and persuasions to institute same-sex relationships in the family law system. The Roman classics realized the danger of misinterpreting the legal nature of the family concept," Astakhov said.
      Such misinterpretation could in time lead to the destruction of moral pillars and the need to amend the inheritance law, he said.
      "You are already forced to abolish the concepts of mother and father," Astakhov said addressing the forum guests. "Then you will have to deal with grandmothers, grandfathers, sisters, brothers, uncles, and aunts. Such centuries-long fundamental notions as mother and father will vanish through nearsightedness and elementary legal ignorance of those who adopt such laws," he said.
      "On what grounds are you negating the entire historical experience, thousands of years of human traditions, and fundamentals of law for the sake of an artificial and unviable construction of an infertile pseudo-family?" Astakhov said at the forum.
      The Russian law "has never recognized and will not recognize such relations as family ones," he said.
      "We cherish our history and our traditional spiritual and family values, but at the same time our law and state do not persecute and are not going to persecute those who choose other forms of relationships," he said.

       

      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=10902

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      Yoshkar-Ola: the investigation of xenophobic materials on website “VKontakte” ends

      SOVA, November 15, 2013

       

      October 2013 Yoshkar-Ola – An investigation into resident Maxim Vorobyov was completed. The investigation was in response to the publication of racist statements on the social networking site “Vkontakte”.

      At the end of October 2013, in the city of Yoshkar-Ola, Mari El Republic, and investigation was completed. The investigation was led in response to statements made that were meant to excite national hatred (section 1, article 282 of the Criminal Code).

      The accused, Maxim Vorobyov (b. 1991), will face the court for publishing hate speech on his page on the social networking site, “VKontakte” from July of last year through March of this year. He specifically called for violence against Jews and immigrants from the Caucasus and Central Asia.

      The case has already been sent to the court for consideration.

       

      http://www.sova-center.ru/en/xenophobia/news-releases/2013/11/d28416/

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      Three extreme racist videos banned in Nyagan, Russia

      SOVA, November 15, 2013

       

      November 1, 2013, Nyagan, Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Area – The court recognized 3 videos which call for violence against peoples from the Caucasus and Central Asia as being extremist. 
      At the request of prosecutors the court recognized a few videos as being extremist.

      It is reported that three videos were posted on one social network and called viewers to violence against peoples of the Caucasus and Central Asia.

      Earlier it was reported that the prosecutor’s office in the October district of Khanty-Mansi Area directed a claim to the court to recognize the extremist videos entitled “Rus, Wake Up!” and “THIS IS WHY WE KILL THE SKINS” It is possible that the current discourse is also about these videos.

       

      http://www.sova-center.ru/en/xenophobia/news-releases/2013/11/d28415/

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      A verdict is reached on the case of xenophobic materials published on the site “Kostroma Jedi”

      SOVA, November 15, 2013

       

      At the end of October 2013 in the city of Kostroma, a resident was fined 120.000 rubles for publishing xenophobic commentary and images on the website “Kostroma Jedi”.

      At the end of October 2013 in Kostroma, Russia, the case ended with charges of excitation of national and religious hatred (section 1, article 282 of the Criminal Code).

      The defendant was a 47 year-old resident of Kostroma, and is accused of repeatedly publishing xenophobic commentary and images on the website “Kostroma Jedi” from April 5, 2012, through June 10, 2012. It is reported that the accused insulted certain ethnic and religious groups and called for violence against them.

      Details are unfortunately unknown at the present time.

      The court found the accused guilty and charged him a fine of 120.000 rubles (approx. $3,700 USD).

      Note also that this is not the first case of xenophobic material on the site “Kostroma Jedi”. In the end of March 2010, the courts in Kostroma fined a 29 year-old participant in the site’s forums (username: Prishelec), whose avatar consisted of a cross framed by a border with a 5-pointed star on the top.

       

      http://www.sova-center.ru/en/xenophobia/news-releases/2013/11/d28414/

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      Muslim migrants coming to Russia often support extremist unities - CIS Anti-Terrorism Center

      Interfax-Religion, November 15, 2013

       

      Minsk, November 15, Interfax - About 40% migrants staying in Russia are natives of Muslim countries, CIS Anti-Terrorism Center head Andrey Novikov said.
      "Up to 40% of migrants come to Russia from Muslim countries. And many of them support extremist organizations which promote overthrowing secular authorities in their countries," Novikov said in Minsk on Friday at the CIS migration services chiefs' council meeting.
      "They often continue recruiting and other destructive activities in their new country and also hide from the law enforcement authorities of other CIS countries," Novikov said.
      "Security bodies and special services of Russia and other CIS assess and react to these risks and threats adequately," Novikov said.
      The CIS Anti-Terrorism Center and the council of the CIS migration services chiefs "are discussing new formats of cooperation and it is planned to sign a protocol on cooperation expansion," Novikov said.
      It is planned to sign an agreement of readmission between Belarus and Russia in Minsk on Friday in the framework of the CIS migration services chiefs' council meeting, the CIS Executive Committee said.
      Russia's Federal Migration Service Chief Konstantin Romodanovsky is authorized to sign the agreement on behalf of Russia and Belarusian Interior Minister Igor Shunevich - on behalf of Belarus.

       

      http://www.interfax-religion.com/?act=news&div=10908

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      II SURVEYS, ANALYSES, COMMENTS

      How Russian Nationalism Fuels Race Riots

      By Sean Guillory 

      The Nation, November 1, 2013

       

      The Biryulyovo riots should be read first and foremost as a protest against the multiethnic state.

      On the surface, the riot in Biryulyovo, a working class district in southern Moscow populated by a heavy mix of Russians and migrants, reveals the extent of Russian racism toward migrants, especially Muslims, and particularly North Caucasians. But writing off this latest ethnic explosion as mere racism brushes over the complexities of Russianess in a country that has been ruled by a multiethnic state since its inception. To understand Russian nationalism, even racism, you need to realize that despite their political, cultural and numerical dominance, many Russians see themselves a nation without a state.

      The multiethnic character of the Russian state has always precluded Russians from becoming the first among other ethnicities. During the Soviet period in particular, Russians were the unmarked Soviet people, their national identity suppressed, and at times, Russians were legally discriminated against. Non-Russian people, in contrast, had their own ethnically demarcated territories, organizations, and celebrated traditions. This persists today. Chechens and Tatars, among others, have their own autonomous territories, while there is no definable Russia for Russians. Historically, the state has been paramount, and this central rule, according to the historian Geoffrey Hosking, came “at the cost of Russia's own sense of nationhood.” This legacy underlines today’s Russian ethnic violence.

      The Biryulyovo riots should be read first and foremost as a protest against the multiethnic state. Through the hatred for the migrant, the riots represent a political demand that Putin’s state represent them as Russians against non-Russians. Many Russians believe that the police stand idle while migrants kill, rob, and rape Russians, either because they’re paid off or incompetent. Every Russian ethnic riot over the last decade (Kondopoga in 2006Manezh in 2010Sagra in 2011, and Pugachev earlier this year) was ignited by similar sentiments.

      Biryulyovo was no different. On October 10, Yegor Shcherbakov, 25, was stabbed to death, allegedly by a Caucasian. The killer fled the scene of the crime. Later police identified the suspect as Orkhan Zeinalov, a native of Azerbaijan. The two got into a fight after Zeinalov reportedly harassed Shcherbakov’s girlfriend.

      The murder caused ethnic tensions between Russians and migrants in Moscow to finally burst. Convinced that the police were ignoring the murder, a crowd gathered on Sunday demanding cops find the killer. The crowd gradually swelled to about 3,000 and turned violent when a group of them attacked a local shopping center. The mob also erected barricades, smashed shops, and fruit and vegetable stands, torched other structures and turned over cars and trucks. Nationalist slogans like “Russia for Russians,” “Forward Slavs!” and “Moscow for Muscovites”rang throughout. Another large group of attackers also marched on the Pokrovsk warehouse. “We’re sick of the lawlessness in this warehouse,” a rioter told Dozhd TV, “[Migrants] come here to set their own rules.” As another Biryulyovo resident told Gazeta.ru, “We get the feeling that we are living in a completely different country.”