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The Migration Period

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  • mike garcia
    Wassail Rig and Group, ... (Gotland, Sweden). Now with this stone which Elliot put the find in the 500 CE, which displays the 24 runes, however what breaks
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 1, 2005
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      Wassail Rig and Group,

      :-) I have been longing for a intellingent conversation on the Runes. I am waiting for Erik Moltkes book to come to the library for I have requested for another loan again. However lets take things back a little and look at some of Ralph W. V. Elliots Runes: An Introduction. Now if you dont mind helping I like to further the investigations however getting views from scholars would also make it so much easier while studing this work. Now I wish to start with the study of the Futhark before we actually start talking about orgins of the runes( believing if one can ground on some of the finds and see where they where might be able to understand to investigate the orgins easier.) Let go to Chapter 2 The Common Germanic Futhark. Now with the Chapter Elliot explains how we can stand strong agruement on five finds to determine that the Germanic futhark is in the order that we have with some little veriants to them. One I would like to start with would be the Gothic Stone from Kyler
      (Gotland, Sweden). Now with this stone which Elliot put the find in the 500 CE, which displays the 24 runes, however what breaks some interest to this is that 2 of the runes are inverted. Now what Elliot states is that one of the few then that broke any ground to having no rules was the North Italic inscriptions. Which he stated governs no rules to it. Interesting so maybe bearing a guess that maybe Italic may have had so influence with this??? or can we hold strong that it was a common error on the knoweldge of the runemaster who carved it?
      This is what I am hoping to be a start of many good conversations and decussions on the runes on the other view of them. Which I see holds greats importances to this study. Everyone is welcome to join in please the more the better.

      Welga!

      Mike

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    • Rig Svenson
      Hej Mike, What a lot of folks don realise is that the Gotland Kylver rune stone is not actually an upright free standing stone as one perceives runestones
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 1, 2005
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        Hej Mike,

        What a lot of folks don' realise is that the Gotland Kylver rune stone is not actually an upright free standing stone as one perceives "runestones" to be. The Kylver stone was a flat rock used to seal a grave and the inscription was written on the underside, and could therefore not be read from above. No one really know why the first period futhark runes was inscribed on this stone covering a grave? Perhaps the grave recipient was someone who runes played a big part in their lives?

        The sowulo appears to be liken to the number 3 and Berkana is reversed. I assume this is what you are referencing as inverted runes.Of note is the fact that:

        The direction of writing in early Runic inscriptions is variable. Later they settled down into a left to right pattern
        Word divisions were not generally recognised in Runic writing, although one or more dots were occasionally used for this function.

        A plausible theory suggests that the rune alphabet sequencing was originally made as a form of cipher. It wasn't mean't to be readable by everyone. The alphabet was meant for those few who really could appreciate it. It was a privilige for the magicians and the learned. A fact that perhaps to some extent support this theory is that the runes for a long time only was used to write down different formulaes and oaths on weapons and shields.

        Wassail

        Rig




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      • mike garcia
        Wassail Rig, Yes I see your point with this and makes really good sense. I forgot where I read that the Kylver Stone when found was probly used as a teaching
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 1, 2005
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          Wassail Rig,

          Yes I see your point with this and makes really good sense. I forgot where I read that the Kylver Stone when found was probly used as a teaching aid from rune-master to student. Brings new light with what you have said on this. Does this brings to the theory that when taught runes in that time period that it was passed down by oral tradition from family members, by which of understanding for this that it took a good of maybe 20 to 30 years to master and that a student in the middle of his workings would of picked a student before even mastering the art for their self. Interesting on the stone if you look more to the right you see another inscription on it. Could it be the markings of the Runemaster who made the Stone??? What is your opinions on this.

          Welga!

          Mike

          Rig Svenson <rig_svenson@...> wrote:
          Hej Mike,

          What a lot of folks don' realise is that the Gotland Kylver rune stone is not actually an upright free standing stone as one perceives "runestones" to be. The Kylver stone was a flat rock used to seal a grave and the inscription was written on the underside, and could therefore not be read from above. No one really know why the first period futhark runes was inscribed on this stone covering a grave? Perhaps the grave recipient was someone who runes played a big part in their lives?

          The sowulo appears to be liken to the number 3 and Berkana is reversed. I assume this is what you are referencing as inverted runes.Of note is the fact that:

          The direction of writing in early Runic inscriptions is variable. Later they settled down into a left to right pattern
          Word divisions were not generally recognised in Runic writing, although one or more dots were occasionally used for this function.

          A plausible theory suggests that the rune alphabet sequencing was originally made as a form of cipher. It wasn't mean't to be readable by everyone. The alphabet was meant for those few who really could appreciate it. It was a privilige for the magicians and the learned. A fact that perhaps to some extent support this theory is that the runes for a long time only was used to write down different formulaes and oaths on weapons and shields.

          Wassail

          Rig




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        • Rig Svenson
          Hej Mike, The concept of master to apprentice is as old as antiquity but most likely runic traditions remained within familly lines and with the warrior
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 1, 2005
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            Hej Mike,

            The concept of master to apprentice is as old as antiquity but most likely runic traditions remained within familly lines and with the warrior classes or those capable of surviving conflict. Of note is the fact that there is some evidence to suggest that more women used runes then men in ancient times. When you consider that the average lifespan in Viking times based on forensic archaeology was around the mid 30s, 20 years did not amount to a great deal of time and therefore a Wolwa seeking an apprentice would find a suitable girl child trainee from a very young age. Hel they married at 12 years of age in Viking times.

            You have to remember that we in the Western World today have no real oral tradition and it took a long time to commit large amounts of knowledge to memory.....much of the material was most likely remembered by creation of poetry or a sort of pneumonics. The runic healing arts involved according to my research a great deal of knowledge of herbs and timing which was the real reason for the galdror. Also many of the herbs used were very poisonous and there was little room for error. Runic healing in tradition does not involve magic per se but the inchantations used served a tottally different purpose to what modern thinking or esoteric rune authors claim.

            I personally believe that runes are meant to be secret.....hence it makes sense to me why the futhark was kept out of sight. The grave recipient must IMHO have been a master of runes.

            Heill ok vel

            Rig








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