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Balouch Prayer Rug Question

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  • The Coles
    Last year I bought a Balouch prayer rug that I ve been curious to know more about. (I ve tried to attach a picture of it to this e-mail - hope it worked! I
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 2, 2001
      Last year I bought a Balouch prayer rug that I've been curious to know more about. (I've tried to attach a picture of it to this e-mail - hope it worked! I wanted to post several pictures on the e-groups site, but once again it's telling me I'm not a member.) I almost didn't buy the rug. I was living in Damascus, Syria, for a couple of years, and a dealer I liked a lot came across this rug. It's small (about 30" by 46"), and he said he thought it was between 80 and 100 years old. He had another customer who he thought would want it, and had a bigger budget for it, but fortunately the other fellow didn't like it, so I got it for quite a bit less than the dealer was going to charge him. I have the Balouch Prayer Rugs book by Adraskand and the Belouch Woven Treasures book by Boucher; there's a rug on pg. 42 of the Prayer Rugs book with a somewhat similar-looking pattern, identified as a Dokhtor-e-Ghazi. However, my rug has the normal Belouch selvedge, unlike the description of the Dokhtor-e-Ghazi in the book. Also, I wouldn't describe my rug's pallette as "dull" (as the book describes those rugs). In the center three of the "diamonds" have the center picked out in obviously synthetic-dye silk, in what was apparently intended to be a special touch. The rug is pretty, and the pattern is pleasing, but it's almost as if the weaver was experimenting with the design, as the borders change design periodically throughout. Some of the design also isn't well executed. The bottom border is missing, but the top border is elaborately embroidered. (It appears to be in very good condition, but I know that the rug was extensively repaired; the dealer told me that between the cost of the rug itself and the cost of the repairs, he came out even.) If anyone recognizes this style of rug, I would love to know more about where it came from. I don't care if it's not as old as the dealer though -- it gives me a lot of pleasure anyway -- but would be curious to know how old it's likely to be.
       
      I have more detailed pictures of the rug and the border, but hesitated to try to attach more than one picture.
       
      Thanks very much for any assistance. I've been enjoying this group very much!
       
      Stacy
       
       
    • Steve Price
      Dear Coles, The rug is certainly a Belouch, and the dealer s estimate that it is 80 to 100 years old is reasonable. If the colors of the silk are yellow and
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 2, 2001
        Dear Coles,

        The rug is certainly a Belouch, and the dealer's estimate that it is
        80 to 100 years old is reasonable. If the colors of the silk are
        yellow and magenta (which is more or less how they look on my
        monitor), the dyes are probably natural. Since the Belouch groups
        used natural dyes until about 1940, this would be expected.

        The Dokhtor-i-Qazi appellation doesn't fit this piece, either in
        terms of layout or motifs.

        The "experimenting" in the borders to which you refer is also obvious
        in the field. There are people who think this is not experimenting,
        but is intentional and part of some secret hidden tradition known
        only to weavers in central and western Asia. I'm not one of those
        people, but thought the notion might interest you.

        Pretty rug!

        Steve Price
      • mahdi dyn
        Hi Stacy, the original motiv of your Baloutch is from South-East Iran, but the motiv of the diamond in the middle of the cadre is from the nomad people of that
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 4, 2001
          Hi Stacy, the original motiv of your Baloutch is from
          South-East Iran, but the motiv of the diamond in the
          middle of the cadre is from the nomad people of that
          part of Iran. In Baloutch language they say to that
          people Ghadzjar, because that nomad people don't
          belong to the Baloutch people.
          I think they prepare your Baloutch very bad, I am
          sorry for you. But I agree with the seller that your
          Baloutch is about 80 years old or even older.
          Hope this information is some help for you.
          Mahdi from Iran.



          --- The Coles <JnSCole@...> wrote:
          > Last year I bought a Balouch prayer rug that I've
          > been curious to know more about. (I've tried to
          > attach a picture of it to this e-mail - hope it
          > worked! I wanted to post several pictures on the
          > e-groups site, but once again it's telling me I'm
          > not a member.) I almost didn't buy the rug. I was
          > living in Damascus, Syria, for a couple of years,
          > and a dealer I liked a lot came across this rug.
          > It's small (about 30" by 46"), and he said he
          > thought it was between 80 and 100 years old. He had
          > another customer who he thought would want it, and
          > had a bigger budget for it, but fortunately the
          > other fellow didn't like it, so I got it for quite a
          > bit less than the dealer was going to charge him. I
          > have the Balouch Prayer Rugs book by Adraskand and
          > the Belouch Woven Treasures book by Boucher; there's
          > a rug on pg. 42 of the Prayer Rugs book with a
          > somewhat similar-looking pattern, identified as a
          > Dokhtor-e-Ghazi. However, my rug has the normal
          > Belouch selvedge, unlike the description of the
          > Dokhtor-e-Ghazi in the book. Also, I wouldn't
          > describe my rug's pallette as "dull" (as the book
          > describes those rugs). In the center three of the
          > "diamonds" have the center picked out in obviously
          > synthetic-dye silk, in what was apparently intended
          > to be a special touch. The rug is pretty, and the
          > pattern is pleasing, but it's almost as if the
          > weaver was experimenting with the design, as the
          > borders change design periodically throughout. Some
          > of the design also isn't well executed. The bottom
          > border is missing, but the top border is elaborately
          > embroidered. (It appears to be in very good
          > condition, but I know that the rug was extensively
          > repaired; the dealer told me that between the cost
          > of the rug itself and the cost of the repairs, he
          > came out even.) If anyone recognizes this style of
          > rug, I would love to know more about where it came
          > from. I don't care if it's not as old as the dealer
          > though -- it gives me a lot of pleasure anyway --
          > but would be curious to know how old it's likely to
          > be.
          >
          > I have more detailed pictures of the rug and the
          > border, but hesitated to try to attach more than one
          > picture.
          >
          > Thanks very much for any assistance. I've been
          > enjoying this group very much!
          >
          > Stacy
          >
          >
          >

          > ATTACHMENT part 2 image/jpeg
          name=Dcp_0112.cropped.jpg



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