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American Rug Making: Materials and Tools Used in Hooking and Tufting Rugs Since 1840

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  • R. John Howe
    Dear folks - Most rug and textile programs are conducted by people knowledgeable in some area. They have studied, perhaps traveled the area of origin, even,
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 6, 2012

      Dear folks –

       

      Most rug and textile programs are conducted by people knowledgeable in some area.  They have studied, perhaps traveled the area of origin, even, analyzed the technical character of, the textiles in their area of expertise.

       

      But we rarely hear from folks who are actually making the sort of textiles they are speaking about.

       

      This is to announce publication of a virtual version of Textile Museum Rug and Textile Appreciation Morning program by someone who is not just a “talker,” but also an active “doer” in the area of his talk.

       

      As the post itself will indicate again, the speaker Michael Heilman is a weaver, who also dyes, builds looms, is interested in rug-making tools, and who teaches rug making here in the Washington , D.C. area.  His presentation was centered on the tools and materials used in making hooked and tufted rugs in the U.S. He especially traced the development of tools used in hooking and tufting, since about 1840.  His eyes, literally, “light up” when he sees a tool he likes.

       

      You can reach this post by clicking on the link immediately below or by copying the link and pasting it into your browser.

       

      http://rjohnhowe.wordpress.com/

       

      This link takes you to an “about” page on my blog.  You can also reach it by doing an internet search for “Textiles and Text R. John Howe.”

       

      The post being announced is the first item in the column in red on the right.

       

      My thanks to Michael for being willing to have this virtual version of his program fashioned, and for his alert, and knowledgeable editing of my draft.

       

      Thanks, also, to Wendel Swan, who took the close-up photos of the tools afterward.

       

      You are receiving this email because you are on one of my lists of “ruggies.”  If you would prefer not to receive future announcements about such posts, please contact me at rjhowe@... and I will remove your name from my listings.  Because of unavoidable overlap in my mailing lists, you may receive more than one of these notices.  If so, please just use your delete key on the redundant ones.

       

      I do not permit direct comments in this blog, and do not particularly encourage any, but if you have something that you feel is useful to share, you can send it to me at the email address above, with your permission to quote you should I decide to publish it.

       

      I hope you enjoy this virtual version of a presentation by someone who actually does what he’s talking about.

       

      Regards,

       

      R. John Howe

       

       

       

    • Blue Bell
      John, I  have a splendid Hassan Dardashti Esfahan 7x10, can I sell that on this site? Blue Bell Washington DC ________________________________ From: R. John
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 8, 2012
        John,

        I  have a splendid Hassan Dardashti Esfahan 7x10, can I sell that on this site?

        Blue Bell
        Washington DC


        From: R. John Howe <rjhowe@...>
        To:
        Cc: 'R. John Howe' <rjhowe@...>
        Sent: Thursday, September 6, 2012 1:59 PM
        Subject: [rug-fanatics] American Rug Making: Materials and Tools Used in Hooking and Tufting Rugs Since 1840

         
        Dear folks –
         
        Most rug and textile programs are conducted by people knowledgeable in some area.  They have studied, perhaps traveled the area of origin, even, analyzed the technical character of, the textiles in their area of expertise.
         
        But we rarely hear from folks who are actually making the sort of textiles they are speaking about.
         
        This is to announce publication of a virtual version of Textile Museum Rug and Textile Appreciation Morning program by someone who is not just a “talker,” but also an active “doer” in the area of his talk.
         
        As the post itself will indicate again, the speaker Michael Heilman is a weaver, who also dyes, builds looms, is interested in rug-making tools, and who teaches rug making here in the Washington , D.C. area.  His presentation was centered on the tools and materials used in making hooked and tufted rugs in the U.S. He especially traced the development of tools used in hooking and tufting, since about 1840.  His eyes, literally, “light up” when he sees a tool he likes.
         
        You can reach this post by clicking on the link immediately below or by copying the link and pasting it into your browser.
         
        http://rjohnhowe.wordpress.com/
         
        This link takes you to an “about” page on my blog.  You can also reach it by doing an internet search for “Textiles and Text R. John Howe.”
         
        The post being announced is the first item in the column in red on the right.
         
        My thanks to Michael for being willing to have this virtual version of his program fashioned, and for his alert, and knowledgeable editing of my draft.
         
        Thanks, also, to Wendel Swan, who took the close-up photos of the tools afterward.
         
        You are receiving this email because you are on one of my lists of “ruggies.”  If you would prefer not to receive future announcements about such posts, please contact me at rjhowe@... and I will remove your name from my listings.  Because of unavoidable overlap in my mailing lists, you may receive more than one of these notices.  If so, please just use your delete key on the redundant ones.
         
        I do not permit direct comments in this blog, and do not particularly encourage any, but if you have something that you feel is useful to share, you can send it to me at the email address above, with your permission to quote you should I decide to publish it.
         
        I hope you enjoy this virtual version of a presentation by someone who actually does what he’s talking about.
         
        Regards,
         
        R. John Howe
         
         
         


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