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RE: [rudiments] drumming terms

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  • Ramon Nazareno
    Thanks Tomas for the enlightenment. Any idea about permutation ? ________________________________ From: rudiments@yahoogroups.com
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 21 7:32 PM
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      Thanks Tomas for the enlightenment. Any idea about "permutation"?







      ________________________________

      From: rudiments@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rudiments@yahoogroups.com] On
      Behalf Of edo wulia
      Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 10:08 AM
      To: rudiments@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms








      How about "Back Beat" ? Anyone?

      and, thanks Tomas.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Tomas Howie" <tomas@...
      <mailto:tomas%40drummingweb.com> >
      To: "rudiments" <rudiments@yahoogroups.com
      <mailto:rudiments%40yahoogroups.com> >
      Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 9:52 AM
      Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms

      > I'll give it a shot, though there are probably as many definitions of
      > this as there are drummers.
      >
      > If you're playing a rock song in 4/4, the downbeat would be the
      "pulse",
      > in this case the kick pattern on 1 and 3.
      >
      > Another definition of downbeat is the "1" of a measure, the first
      beat.
      > "Come in on the downbeat" means come in on "1" of the next measure.
      >
      > The backbeat is the snare hits on 2 and 4. The sub-pulse, if you will.
      >
      > The up beat - I think - is the & of the measure 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &. This
      > is the source of syncopation, which is emphasizing the & instead of
      the
      > quarter note.
      >
      > Upbeat can also mean fast, quick, or something that feels more
      energetic
      > in a light, lively way.
      >
      > The side beat? Don't know. Maybe the "e" and "ah" of a measure? 1 - e
      > - & - ah - 2 - e - & - ah, etc. The sixteenth notes?
      >
      > Good questions. Anyone else have any answers?
      >
      > Tomas
      > rudiments owner
      >
      >
      >
      > edo wulia wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >> Hi list,
      >>
      >> How do you explain drumming terms: 'down beat' , 'up beat' and 'back
      >> beat' ?
      >> Thanks and looking forward to get some responses.
      >>
      >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >




      The information in this electronic message is privileged and confidential, intended only for use of the individual or entity named as addressee and recipient. If you are not the addressee indicated in this message (or responsible for delivery of the message to such person), you may not copy, use, disseminate or deliver this message. In such case, you should immediately delete this e-mail and notify the sender by reply e-mail. Please advise immediately if you or your employer do not consent to Internet e-mail for messages of this kind. Opinions, conclusions and other information expressed in this message are not given, nor endorsed by and are not the responsibility of Unifrutti Services, Inc., unless otherwise indicated by an authorized representative of Unifrutti Services, Inc., independent of this message.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Paul van der Vossen
      As far as I know David Garibaldi first coined the term permutation meaning : take a rhythmic pattern e.g. 1-e-&-e , just play the red lettering ( Daa-doodat)
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 21 11:40 PM
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        As far as I know David Garibaldi first coined the term "permutation"
        meaning : take a rhythmic pattern e.g. 1-e-&-e , just play the red
        lettering ( Daa-doodat) and first time round start the pattern on 1,
        repeat until comfortable, then play it on e.g. on the "e "of 1, "&" of 1
        and in this manner let the pattern shift through the measure until
        you're back to 1 again.
        Better yet, get his book "Future Sounds" and and play it!

        Paul

        Ramon Nazareno schreef:
        >
        >
        > Thanks Tomas for the enlightenment. Any idea about "permutation"?
        >
        > ________________________________
        >
        > From: rudiments@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rudiments%40yahoogroups.com>
        > [mailto:rudiments@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rudiments%40yahoogroups.com>] On
        > Behalf Of edo wulia
        > Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 10:08 AM
        > To: rudiments@yahoogroups.com <mailto:rudiments%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms
        >
        > How about "Back Beat" ? Anyone?
        >
        > and, thanks Tomas.
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Tomas Howie" <tomas@...
        > <mailto:tomas%40drummingweb.com>
        > <mailto:tomas%40drummingweb.com> >
        > To: "rudiments" <rudiments@yahoogroups.com
        > <mailto:rudiments%40yahoogroups.com>
        > <mailto:rudiments%40yahoogroups.com> >
        > Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 9:52 AM
        > Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms
        >
        > > I'll give it a shot, though there are probably as many definitions of
        > > this as there are drummers.
        > >
        > > If you're playing a rock song in 4/4, the downbeat would be the
        > "pulse",
        > > in this case the kick pattern on 1 and 3.
        > >
        > > Another definition of downbeat is the "1" of a measure, the first
        > beat.
        > > "Come in on the downbeat" means come in on "1" of the next measure.
        > >
        > > The backbeat is the snare hits on 2 and 4. The sub-pulse, if you will.
        > >
        > > The up beat - I think - is the & of the measure 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &. This
        > > is the source of syncopation, which is emphasizing the & instead of
        > the
        > > quarter note.
        > >
        > > Upbeat can also mean fast, quick, or something that feels more
        > energetic
        > > in a light, lively way.
        > >
        > > The side beat? Don't know. Maybe the "e" and "ah" of a measure? 1 - e
        > > - & - ah - 2 - e - & - ah, etc. The sixteenth notes?
        > >
        > > Good questions. Anyone else have any answers?
        > >
        > > Tomas
        > > rudiments owner
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > edo wulia wrote:
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> Hi list,
        > >>
        > >> How do you explain drumming terms: 'down beat' , 'up beat' and 'back
        > >> beat' ?
        > >> Thanks and looking forward to get some responses.
        > >>
        > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >>
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > The information in this electronic message is privileged and
        > confidential, intended only for use of the individual or entity named
        > as addressee and recipient. If you are not the addressee indicated in
        > this message (or responsible for delivery of the message to such
        > person), you may not copy, use, disseminate or deliver this message.
        > In such case, you should immediately delete this e-mail and notify the
        > sender by reply e-mail. Please advise immediately if you or your
        > employer do not consent to Internet e-mail for messages of this kind.
        > Opinions, conclusions and other information expressed in this message
        > are not given, nor endorsed by and are not the responsibility of
        > Unifrutti Services, Inc., unless otherwise indicated by an authorized
        > representative of Unifrutti Services, Inc., independent of this message.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • SteveV
        It would be nice to see these great explanations in written notation. A lot of double bass applications speak of playing the left kick on the upbeat. ... From:
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 22 11:39 AM
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          It would be nice to see these great explanations in written notation. A lot of double bass applications speak of playing the left kick on the upbeat.
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Ramon Nazareno
          To: edo wulia ; rudiments@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:32 PM
          Subject: RE: [rudiments] drumming terms





          Thanks Tomas for the enlightenment. Any idea about "permutation"?

          ________________________________

          From: rudiments@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rudiments@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of edo wulia
          Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 10:08 AM
          To: rudiments@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms

          How about "Back Beat" ? Anyone?

          and, thanks Tomas.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Tomas Howie" <tomas@...
          <mailto:tomas%40drummingweb.com> >
          To: "rudiments" <rudiments@yahoogroups.com
          <mailto:rudiments%40yahoogroups.com> >
          Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 9:52 AM
          Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms

          > I'll give it a shot, though there are probably as many definitions of
          > this as there are drummers.
          >
          > If you're playing a rock song in 4/4, the downbeat would be the
          "pulse",
          > in this case the kick pattern on 1 and 3.
          >
          > Another definition of downbeat is the "1" of a measure, the first
          beat.
          > "Come in on the downbeat" means come in on "1" of the next measure.
          >
          > The backbeat is the snare hits on 2 and 4. The sub-pulse, if you will.
          >
          > The up beat - I think - is the & of the measure 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &. This
          > is the source of syncopation, which is emphasizing the & instead of
          the
          > quarter note.
          >
          > Upbeat can also mean fast, quick, or something that feels more
          energetic
          > in a light, lively way.
          >
          > The side beat? Don't know. Maybe the "e" and "ah" of a measure? 1 - e
          > - & - ah - 2 - e - & - ah, etc. The sixteenth notes?
          >
          > Good questions. Anyone else have any answers?
          >
          > Tomas
          > rudiments owner
          >
          >
          >
          > edo wulia wrote:
          >>
          >>
          >> Hi list,
          >>
          >> How do you explain drumming terms: 'down beat' , 'up beat' and 'back
          >> beat' ?
          >> Thanks and looking forward to get some responses.
          >>
          >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >

          The information in this electronic message is privileged and confidential, intended only for use of the individual or entity named as addressee and recipient. If you are not the addressee indicated in this message (or responsible for delivery of the message to such person), you may not copy, use, disseminate or deliver this message. In such case, you should immediately delete this e-mail and notify the sender by reply e-mail. Please advise immediately if you or your employer do not consent to Internet e-mail for messages of this kind. Opinions, conclusions and other information expressed in this message are not given, nor endorsed by and are not the responsibility of Unifrutti Services, Inc., unless otherwise indicated by an authorized representative of Unifrutti Services, Inc., independent of this message.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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          Steve Vollo
          Cell-770-364-2710

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jim
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(music)#Backbeat Enjoy! ________________________________ From: SteveV To: edo wulia ;
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 7, 2009
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            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beat_(music)#Backbeat

            Enjoy!




            ________________________________
            From: SteveV <svollo@...>
            To: edo wulia <edo@...>; rudiments@yahoogroups.com; Ramon Nazareno <rnazareno@...>
            Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 2:39:00 PM
            Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms





            It would be nice to see these great explanations in written notation. A lot of double bass applications speak of playing the left kick on the upbeat.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Ramon Nazareno
            To: edo wulia ; rudiments@yahoogrou ps.com
            Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2009 10:32 PM
            Subject: RE: [rudiments] drumming terms

            Thanks Tomas for the enlightenment. Any idea about "permutation" ?

            ____________ _________ _________ __

            From: rudiments@yahoogrou ps.com [mailto:rudiments@yahoogrou ps.com] On
            Behalf Of edo wulia
            Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 10:08 AM
            To: rudiments@yahoogrou ps.com
            Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms

            How about "Back Beat" ? Anyone?

            and, thanks Tomas.

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Tomas Howie" <tomas@drummingweb. com
            <mailto:tomas% 40drummingweb. com> >
            To: "rudiments" <rudiments@yahoogrou ps.com
            <mailto:rudiments% 40yahoogroups. com> >
            Sent: Wednesday, April 22, 2009 9:52 AM
            Subject: Re: [rudiments] drumming terms

            > I'll give it a shot, though there are probably as many definitions of
            > this as there are drummers.
            >
            > If you're playing a rock song in 4/4, the downbeat would be the
            "pulse",
            > in this case the kick pattern on 1 and 3.
            >
            > Another definition of downbeat is the "1" of a measure, the first
            beat.
            > "Come in on the downbeat" means come in on "1" of the next measure.
            >
            > The backbeat is the snare hits on 2 and 4. The sub-pulse, if you will.
            >
            > The up beat - I think - is the & of the measure 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 &. This
            > is the source of syncopation, which is emphasizing the & instead of
            the
            > quarter note.
            >
            > Upbeat can also mean fast, quick, or something that feels more
            energetic
            > in a light, lively way.
            >
            > The side beat? Don't know. Maybe the "e" and "ah" of a measure? 1 - e
            > - & - ah - 2 - e - & - ah, etc. The sixteenth notes?
            >
            > Good questions. Anyone else have any answers?
            >
            > Tomas
            > rudiments owner
            >
            >
            >
            > edo wulia wrote:
            >>
            >>
            >> Hi list,
            >>
            >> How do you explain drumming terms: 'down beat' , 'up beat' and 'back
            >> beat' ?
            >> Thanks and looking forward to get some responses.
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------ --------- --------- ------
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >

            The information in this electronic message is privileged and confidential, intended only for use of the individual or entity named as addressee and recipient. If you are not the addressee indicated in this message (or responsible for delivery of the message to such person), you may not copy, use, disseminate or deliver this message. In such case, you should immediately delete this e-mail and notify the sender by reply e-mail. Please advise immediately if you or your employer do not consent to Internet e-mail for messages of this kind. Opinions, conclusions and other information expressed in this message are not given, nor endorsed by and are not the responsibility of Unifrutti Services, Inc., unless otherwise indicated by an authorized representative of Unifrutti Services, Inc., independent of this message.

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -

            No virus found in this incoming message.
            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 8.5.287 / Virus Database: 270.12.2/2072 - Release Date: 04/21/09 16:48:00

            Steve Vollo
            Cell-770-364- 2710

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







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