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Fwd: request for an AAG Resolution boycotting Arizona as a place to hold meetings of the AAG

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  • Alan A. Lew
    FYI -- Alan ... From: Ken MacDonald Date: Sun, May 30, 2010 at 7:28 AM Subject: request for an AAG Resolution boycotting Arizona as a
    Message 1 of 2 , May 30, 2010
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      FYI -- Alan

      ---------- Forwarded message ----------
      From: Ken MacDonald <kmacd@...>
      Date: Sun, May 30, 2010 at 7:28 AM
      Subject: request for an AAG Resolution boycotting Arizona as a place to hold meetings of the AAG
      To: LEFTGEOG@...


      Dear AAG Executive Committee and National Councillors,

      I received a note last week that the American Anthropological Association has taken steps to challenge the introduction of Arizona's new immigration law by boycotting Arizona as a place to hold meetings of the AAA.  One of their primary reasons for this boycott - that  "there exists more than a century of anthropological findings on the crucial social and political impact of discrimination based on race, national origin and ethnicity and a long history of anthropological concern for the well-being of immigrant populations, the American Anthropological Association considers these laws and the ways they may be implemented to be discriminatory" - applies equally well to the work and findings of (some) geographers.  I write to request that the AAG executive build on the initiative undertaken by the AAA, adopt a similar resolution (the text is attached below for reference, please note the exclusion of Indian reservations from the boycott), and widely publicize the boycott.  Please note that the AAA resolution did not involve a vote of the membership.  It was initiated and adopted by the Executive Board of the AAA.  I see no reason that the Executive of the AAG cannot adopt a similar resolution, and encourage you to do so. 

      Yours sincerely,

      Ken MacDonald

      Kenneth Iain MacDonald, Ph.D.
      Dept. of Geography & Program in Planning;
      Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies;
      Program in International Development Studies
      University of Toronto
      1265 Military Trail,
      Toronto, Ontario
      M1C 1A4

      416-946-3205 (CDTS)
      416-287-7294 (UTSC)
      416-287-7283 (fax)


      Executive Board Passes Resolution Challenging Immigration Law in Arizona


      FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
      May 24, 2010

      Anthropologists Challenge New Arizona Immigration Law

      In a strongly-worded resolution passed by its Executive Board on May 22, 2010, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) condemned the enactment of a new law in Arizona that directs law enforcement officers to detain individuals and investigate their immigration status if they think they might be in the country without documentation. 

      Arizona Senate Bill (SB) 1070, signed into law by Arizona Governor Jan Brewer one month ago, makes the failure to carry certain immigration documents a crime and gives the police broad power to detain anyone suspected of being in the country illegally, even if they have committed no other crime.  A recently passed amendment to SB 1070, House Bill 2162, states that a person’s immigration status can only be investigated during a legal stop or arrest.  

      Arizonahas a large Hispanic population, and many commentators have perceived the law as a movement to target and harass this group.  The leadership of the American Anthropological Association views the law as giving police broad discretion to single out members of a specific ethnic group, and to encroach on established due process rights.   

       “The AAA has a long and rich history of supporting policies that prohibit discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion or sexual orientation, and of concern for the well-being of immigrant populations,” AAA Executive Board Member Debra Martin said in a statement issued today. “Recent actions by the Arizona officials and law enforcement are not only discriminatory; they are also predatory and unconstitutional.” 

      The AAA resolution pledges that the association as a whole will refuse to hold a scholarly conference in Arizona until SB 1070 is either repealed or struck down as constitutionally invalid.  It makes an exception for conferences held on Indian reservations in Arizona.

       

      AAA Arizona Resolution
      Adopted by the AAA Executive Board May 22, 2010

      Whereas, the American Anthropological Association has historically supported policies that prohibit discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, and sexual orientation; and

      Whereas, the American Anthropological Association has a membership of more than 10,500 people, and an annual meeting that draws more than 4,000 members; and

      Whereas, the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association takes notice of Arizona Senate Bill 1070 requiring all local law enforcement to investigate a person's immigration status when there is a reasonable suspicion that the person is in the United States unlawfully, regardless of whether that person is suspected of a crime; and

      Whereas, the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association takes notice of Arizona House Bill 2162 that stipulates that person's immigration status must be investigated only during a lawful stop, detention, or arrest; and

      Whereas, there exists more than a century of anthropological findings on the crucial social and political impact of discrimination based on race, national origin and ethnicity and a long history of anthropological concern for the well-being of immigrant populations, the American Anthropological Association considers these laws and the ways they may be implemented to be discriminatory.

      Now, therefore be it resolved that the American Anthropological Association resolves not to hold a scholarly conference in the State of Arizona until such time that Senate Bill 1070 is either repealed or struck down as constitutionally invalid and thus unenforceable by a court; and

      Be it further resolved that this boycott of Arizona as a place to hold meetings of the American Anthropological Association does not apply to Indian Reservations within the State of Arizona.







    • Dallen Timothy
      It s too bad people, such as Ken MacDonald, never learned to read. There isn t a modicum of racism in the new Arizona legislation, no matter how much certain
      Message 2 of 2 , May 30, 2010
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        It’s too bad people, such as Ken MacDonald, never learned to read. There isn’t a modicum of racism in the new Arizona legislation, no matter how much certain political elements want everyone to believe there is. The ignorance is astounding.

         

        Dallen

         


        From: rtsnet@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rtsnet@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Alan A. Lew
        Sent: Sunday, May 30, 2010 9:38 AM
        To: RTSnet
        Subject: [rtsnet] Fwd: request for an AAG Resolution boycotting Arizona as a place to hold meetings of the AAG

         

         

        FYI -- Alan

        ---------- Forwarded message ----------
        From: Ken MacDonald <kmacd@... .ca>
        Date: Sun, May 30, 2010 at 7:28 AM
        Subject: request for an AAG Resolution boycotting Arizona as a place to hold meetings of the AAG
        To: LEFTGEOG@lsv. uky.edu

        Dear AAG Executive Committee and National Councillors,

         

        I received a note last week that the American Anthropological Association has taken steps to challenge the introduction of Arizona 's new immigration law by boycotting Arizona as a place to hold meetings of the AAA.  One of their primary reasons for this boycott - that  "there exists more than a century of anthropological findings on the crucial social and political impact of discrimination based on race, national origin and ethnicity and a long history of anthropological concern for the well-being of immigrant populations, the American Anthropological Association considers these laws and the ways they may be implemented to be discriminatory" - applies equally well to the work and findings of (some) geographers.  I write to request that the AAG executive build on the initiative undertaken by the AAA, adopt a similar resolution (the text is attached below for reference, please note the exclusion of Indian reservations from the boycott), and widely publicize the boycott.  Please note that the AAA resolution did not involve a vote of the membership.  It was initiated and adopted by the Executive Board of the AAA.  I see no reason that the Executive of the AAG cannot adopt a similar resolution, and encourage you to do so. 

         

        Yours sincerely,

         

        Ken MacDonald

         

        Kenneth Iain MacDonald, Ph.D.

        Dept. of Geography & Program in Planning;

        Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies;

        Program in International Development Studies

        University of Toronto

        1265 Military Trail,

        Toronto , Ontario

        M1C 1A4

         

        416-946-3205 (CDTS)

        416-287-7294 (UTSC)

        416-287-7283 (fax)

         

         

        Executive Board Passes Resolution Challenging Immigration Law in Arizona

        FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

        May 24, 2010

        Anthropologists Challenge New Arizona Immigration Law

        In a strongly-worded resolution passed by its Executive Board on May 22, 2010, the American Anthropological Association (AAA) condemned the enactment of a new law in Arizona that directs law enforcement officers to detain individuals and investigate their immigration status if they think they might be in the country without documentation. 

        Arizona Senate Bill (SB) 1070, signed into law by Arizona Governor Jan Brewer one month ago, makes the failure to carry certain immigration documents a crime and gives the police broad power to detain anyone suspected of being in the country illegally, even if they have committed no other crime.  A recently passed amendment to SB 1070, House Bill 2162, states that a person’s immigration status can only be investigated during a legal stop or arrest.  

        Arizonahas a large Hispanic population, and many commentators have perceived the law as a movement to target and harass this group.  The leadership of the American Anthropological Association views the law as giving police broad discretion to single out members of a specific ethnic group, and to encroach on established due process rights.   

         “The AAA has a long and rich history of supporting policies that prohibit discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion or sexual orientation, and of concern for the well-being of immigrant populations,” AAA Executive Board Member Debra Martin said in a statement issued today. “Recent actions by the Arizona officials and law enforcement are not only discriminatory; they are also predatory and unconstitutional.” 

        The AAA resolution pledges that the association as a whole will refuse to hold a scholarly conference in Arizona until SB 1070 is either repealed or struck down as constitutionally invalid.  It makes an exception for conferences held on Indian reservations in Arizona .

         


        AAA Arizona Resolution
        Adopted by the AAA Executive Board May 22, 2010

        Whereas, the American Anthropological Association has historically supported policies that prohibit discrimination based on race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, and sexual orientation; and

        Whereas, the American Anthropological Association has a membership of more than 10,500 people, and an annual meeting that draws more than 4,000 members; and

        Whereas, the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association takes notice of Arizona Senate Bill 1070 requiring all local law enforcement to investigate a person's immigration status when there is a reasonable suspicion that the person is in the United States unlawfully, regardless of whether that person is suspected of a crime; and

        Whereas, the Executive Board of the American Anthropological Association takes notice of Arizona House Bill 2162 that stipulates that person's immigration status must be investigated only during a lawful stop, detention, or arrest; and

        Whereas, there exists more than a century of anthropological findings on the crucial social and political impact of discrimination based on race, national origin and ethnicity and a long history of anthropological concern for the well-being of immigrant populations, the American Anthropological Association considers these laws and the ways they may be implemented to be discriminatory.

        Now, therefore be it resolved that the American Anthropological Association resolves not to hold a scholarly conference in the State of Arizona until such time that Senate Bill 1070 is either repealed or struck down as constitutionally invalid and thus unenforceable by a court; and

        Be it further resolved that this boycott of Arizona as a place to hold meetings of the American Anthropological Association does not apply to Indian Reservations within the State of Arizona .

         

         

         

         

         

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