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TTRI Research Seminar

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  • Lavin Ann
    TTRI Research Seminar Abstract In spite of apparent stiff competition, the International Indian Film Academy (IIFA) Weekend and Awards Ceremony (the Bollywood
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 30, 2008
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      TTRI Research Seminar

      Abstract

       

      In spite of apparent stiff competition, the International Indian Film Academy (IIFA) Weekend and Awards Ceremony (the ‘Bollywood

      Oscars’) came to Yorkshire in June 2007.  The event comprised a

      series of parties, dinners, a film premiere, a celebrity cricket match and culminated in the awards ceremony itself. The four day ‘weekend’ cost an estimated £5 million to stage, of which more than £2 million was provided by the regional development agency. The event was considered a great success, officially at least, because it attracted significant media attention in the UK and abroad (especially in India) and generated additional revenue from visitors, thus strengthening the regional economy.  Such perceptions are, of course, contested.

                                                                                         

      Decisions to support events and festivals such as this emerge from local political processes. Yet, as Hall and Rusher (2005:229) have noted, ‘Despite their significance, there still remains relatively little analysis of the political context of events and the means by which events come to be developed and hosted within communities.. ‘ This seminar will respond to this deficiency by considering the following: Why were the awards staged in Yorkshire? What was the process of attracting the awards to this locality? How should we interpret or

      understand such a process of tourism policy formation?

       


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    • Lavin Ann
      TTRI Research Seminar Abstract In spite of apparent stiff competition, the International Indian Film Academy (IIFA) Weekend and Awards Ceremony (the Bollywood
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 14, 2008
      • 0 Attachment

         

         

        TTRI Research Seminar

        Abstract

         

        In spite of apparent stiff competition, the International Indian Film Academy (IIFA) Weekend and Awards Ceremony (the ‘Bollywood

        Oscars’) came to Yorkshire in June 2007.  The event comprised a

        series of parties, dinners, a film premiere, a celebrity cricket match and culminated in the awards ceremony itself. The four day ‘weekend’ cost an estimated £5 million to stage, of which more than £2 million was provided by the regional development agency. The event was considered a great success, officially at least, because it attracted significant media attention in the UK and abroad (especially in India) and generated additional revenue from visitors, thus strengthening the regional economy.  Such perceptions are, of course, contested.

                                                                                           

        Decisions to support events and festivals such as this emerge from local political processes. Yet, as Hall and Rusher (2005:229) have noted, ‘Despite their significance, there still remains relatively little analysis of the political context of events and the means by which events come to be developed and hosted within communities.. ‘ This seminar will respond to this deficiency by considering the following: Why were the awards staged in Yorkshire? What was the process of attracting the awards to this locality? How should we interpret or

        understand such a process of tourism policy formation?

         


        This message has been checked for viruses but the contents of an attachment may still contain software viruses, which could damage your computer system: you are advised to perform your own checks. Email communications with the University of Nottingham may be monitored as permitted by UK legislation.

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