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Re: [rss-public] Overriding Core elements via extensions

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  • James Holderness
    ... I ran a couple of tests through my little aggregator collection and these were the results: Basically everyone supported content:encoded (except
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 21, 2006
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      Sam Ruby wrote:
      > Consider an RSS 2.0 item which contains only the following elements:
      > description
      > content:encoded
      > xhtml:body
      > atom:summary
      > atom:content

      I ran a couple of tests through my little aggregator collection and these
      were the results:

      Basically everyone supported content:encoded (except Thunderbird), almost
      nobody supported atom extensions (except Sharpreader), and around half
      supported xhtml:body to some extent (prefixed xhtml generally caused
      problems). When they're mixed together in a single item, extensions are
      usually chosen before the standard description element and when multiple
      extensions are supported by an aggregator, the last one encountered usually
      takes preference.

      Aggregators tested: Blogbridge, Bloglines, BottomFeeder, FeedDemon,
      FeedReader, Googler Reader, GreatNews, JetBrains Omea, Netvibes, Newsgator
      Online, NewzCrawler, RSSBandit, RSSOwl, Sharpreader, Snarfer and
      Thunderbird.

      Bloglines, BottomFeeder, JetBrains Omea, Newsgator Online, NewzCrawler,
      RSSBandit, Sharpreader and Snarfer all supported xhtml:body. Only Snarfer
      interpreted markup when it was prefixed (i.e. xhtml wasn't the default
      namespace), BottomFeeder never interpreted the markup regardless of whether
      it was prefixed or not, and Bloglines failed to display any content at all
      when the markup was prefixed.

      When all the elements were included in the order you listed, Bloglines,
      JetBrains Omea, Newsgator Online, NewzCrawler, RSSBandit and Snarfer
      displayed xhtml:body, Sharpreader displayed atom:content, Thunderbird
      displayed the description, and everyone else displayed content:encoded.

      When the elements were included in reverse order, FeedDemon, NewzCrawler and
      Thunderbird displayed the description element, Newsgator Online display
      xhtml:body, and everyone else display content:encoded.

      It's probably also worth nothing that everyone interpreted the markup
      correctly when included in the description element although this wasn't
      intended to be a markup test so the example used was as simple as possible.

      Regards
      James
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