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Re: How to make your feed cloud-aware

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  • randymorin
    Can you elaborate on how you enabled NAT traversal? Firewalls are not only a technical problem, they are also an adoption problem. Most all large corporations
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 21, 2009
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      Can you elaborate on how you enabled NAT traversal?

      Firewalls are not only a technical problem, they are also an adoption problem. Most all large corporations have chosen not to open inbound ports thru firewalls. That's a pretty big adoption problem. I'd rather we look for a solution that can work for corporate America as well as technogeeks. I don't see any solution that doesn't work for coporate America surviving.

      Thanks,

      Randy


      --- In rss-public@yahoogroups.com, "James Holderness" <j4_james@...> wrote:
      > I'm guessing you didn't read my message in which I said I had just got RSS
      > cloud working on a deskop client from behind a NAT - no router configuration
      > required.
      >
      > I don't see a technical problem with any of your scenarios. RSS cloud won't
      > work on any network where the system administrator doesn't want to allow
      > that kind of traffic, but that's their choice to make - that's not a
      > technical problem with the protocol. IMHO.
      >
      > Regards
      > James
      >
    • James Holderness
      ... I m using UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) - more specifically, the Internet Gateway Device protocol. On Windows, it s just a couple of lines of code. You
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 21, 2009
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        randymorin wrote:
        > Can you elaborate on how you enabled NAT traversal?

        I'm using UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) - more specifically, the Internet
        Gateway Device protocol. On Windows, it's just a couple of lines of code.
        You can learn the external IP address (including notification of when that
        address changes) and add and remove port mappings on the router as you need
        them.

        > Firewalls are not only a technical problem, they are also an
        > adoption problem. Most all large corporations have chosen not
        > to open inbound ports thru firewalls.

        The way I see it, the corporation has two choices. Either they don't want
        their employees mucking about on twitter (and twitter-like protocols) all
        day, in which case it's perfectly reasonable for them to block such
        connections. Or, they consider real-time RSS feeds important to their
        business in which case they'll find a way to make them work.

        Now, assuming they want to make them work, I can see two options. Option one
        would be to allow client applications to open ports in their firewalls as
        necessary (using UPnP). I suspect their are security reasons which preclude
        large corps from doing this, but I don't think it's unimaginable for smaller
        companies.

        Option two would be to invest in some kind of enterprise RSS gateway product
        that handles the caching and forwarding of cloud notifications automatically
        (not to mention caching of regular RSS content). Such a product may not yet
        exist, but if this real-time feed thing really starts to take off, it could
        be a great business opportunity.

        Also, bare in mind that PSHB/PuSH has all the same problems as RSS cloud in
        this regard, so they'll be looking for similar solutions.

        Regards
        James
      • randymorin
        UPnP is not supported by many routers and is specifically disabled in Windows by default because of malware issues. This solution would only work, if a geek
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 21, 2009
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          UPnP is not supported by many routers and is specifically disabled in Windows by default because of malware issues. This solution would only work, if a geek like me and you were at the helm. The user doesn't have to configure the router, but he does have to configure Windows. It would not work in the majority of cases. Further, most every public WiFi enabled router does not enable or support UPnP.

          On both the corporate and NAT fronts. These are technically viable solutions that you've presented. Neither works in the real world where an uber-geek is not present. Neither are viable solutions as they will only work in the 1% case.

          Thanks,

          Randy

          --- In rss-public@yahoogroups.com, "James Holderness" <j4_james@...> wrote:

          > I'm using UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) - more specifically, the Internet
          > Gateway Device protocol. On Windows, it's just a couple of lines of code.
          > You can learn the external IP address (including notification of when that
          > address changes) and add and remove port mappings on the router as you need
          > them.
          >
        • James Holderness
          ... The Windows firewall can be controlled programmatically as well, so in theory that part is still feasible without geek intervention too. As for UPnP
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 21, 2009
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            randymorin wrote:
            > UPnP is not supported by many routers and is specifically disabled
            > in Windows by default because of malware issues. This solution
            > would only work, if a geek like me and you were at the helm.

            The Windows firewall can be controlled programmatically as well, so in
            theory that part is still feasible without geek intervention too. As for
            UPnP support, I don't have any official stats, but I've seen some sources
            claiming most home routers support it. Certainly I would expect more than
            1%.

            Also bare in mind that applications like BitTorrent and Instant Message (for
            things like file transfers) rely on this sort of technology as well. That
            means there's a reasonable chance that the average user's computer has
            already been setup correctly by their friendly neighbourhood geek.

            I don't expect this to work on every computer in every possible situation,
            but I don't think it's anywhere near as problematic as you seem to think.
            With a well written client I expect it to just work out of the box for most
            people. Maybe I'm overly optimistic.

            Regards
            James
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