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Re: [Enfield] Re: fuse Intermittant blowing

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  • P Snidal
    ... Nor would I! Possibly you DID have an internal rectifier problem, which you have apparently now fixed. A problem in the rectifier could, I think,
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 11, 2013
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      >The factory fuse in the fuse holder has a 20 amp rating. I installed
      >a new rectifier yesterday and haven't had any problems today. The
      >melted spot on the AC connection suprised me, as I would think that
      >the two violet AC wires short to ground would not cause an increase in I.

      Nor would I! Possibly you DID have an internal rectifier problem,
      which you have apparently now fixed. A problem in the rectifier
      could, I think, increase the AC current, thus overloading the
      alternator and the feed wires/connectors. Let's hope you fixed it,
      since there's no fuse in your AC loop through the rectifier. You
      might want to think about putting one in, though! Either line or
      both. I've suggested it before, but haven't ever done it myself. As
      for the 20A fuse, I wouldn't go any higher than that, and in fact now
      that you have a new rec, maybe try a 10 or 15 again...

      >So for now, I believe it to be an internal problem with the
      >rectifier. I am having fun chasing this down, which is one of the
      >most enjoyable parts about owning a Bullet. Thanks Pete, your
      >great. Your manual was a great purchase as well.

      Glad to help! 8-)
      Keep Bullin'!
      ps
    • patrickjohncrum@att.net
      I had this happen to me before, it turned out (pun intended, LOL!) that my clutch cable had worn through the outer sheathing just inside the Nacelle/casquette
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 13, 2013
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        I had this happen to me before, it turned out (pun intended, LOL!) that my clutch cable had worn through the outer sheathing just inside the Nacelle/casquette and when I turned, it would touch the leads on my headlight switch (rotary Miller switch in place of the ignition) and short out the system....Just something to consider :)
        Cheers,
        Pat


        --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tschmidt@...> wrote:
        >
        > Frget everything I said about the rectifier, I rode the bike for an hour or so and while turning a corner it blew a fuse once again. I may have found a gray wire that has insulation missing. That may be the problem. I will let you know.
        >
        > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <tschmidt@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I looked at the wiring loom carefully, and the only problem I could find was melted spot on the AC blade of the connector to the rectifier. The factory fuse in the fuse holder has a 20 amp rating. I installed a new rectifier yesterday and haven't had any problems today. The melted spot on the AC connection suprised me, as I would think that the two violet AC wires short to ground would not cause an increase in I. So for now, I believe it to be an internal problem with the rectifier. I am having fun chasing this down, which is one of the most enjoyable parts about owning a Bullet. Thanks Pete, your great. Your manual was a great purchase as well.
        > >
        > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, P Snidal <snidepete@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > At 09:48 PM 7/8/2013, you wrote:
        > > > >I have a short that blows the main fuse when I rev-up the engine. I
        > > > >can't find a burned wire or obvious missing insulation. I wonder if
        > > > >the rectifier is beginning to fail and causing an internal short
        > > > >circuit. Does a failing rectifier cause the symptoms I describe?
        > > >
        > > > Ohm's Law: I=E/R I is current, E is Voltage. For a given R
        > > > (resistance) increasing voltage increases current. Amps. Which is
        > > > what blows fuses. - at a certain current threshold, in amps, the fuse lets go.
        > > > Meaning either your fuse is too low a rating, or you have a
        > > > semi-short, which doesn't pull enough amps at battery voltage, but
        > > > when you get to charging voltage, thar she blows!
        > > > First thing to do is try a slightly higher fuse rating. If
        > > > you're blowing 10s, try a 15. Maybe even a 20, but with a higher
        > > > fuse rating goes a responsibility to make sure nothing's frying! So
        > > > I'd look awfully carefully along my wiring loom for a problem. It
        > > > could be a component, too - such as the rectifier you suspect. You
        > > > might try disconnecting the rectifier output temporarily, and see if
        > > > that makes a difference - especially with the lower fuse rating, if
        > > > you have any left anyway.
        > > > it can be fun to chase this stuff down; just don't lose your
        > > > sense of humour! 8-)
        > > > Good luck with it!
        > > > ps www.enfield.20m.com
        > > >
        > >
        >
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