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Enfield Trials & Woodsman

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  • NIGEL
    May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I m starting out on
    Message 1 of 25 , Feb 1, 2011
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      May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.

      I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.

      Regards

      Nigel

      ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
    • John Halford
      big difference between a 150 mph triumph and a 70 mph enfield. i would get a well sorted out old british bike, like a norton comando, and it will go up in
      Message 2 of 25 , Feb 1, 2011
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        big difference between a 150 mph triumph and a 70 mph enfield.
        i would get a well sorted out old british bike, like a norton comando, and it will go up in value as well
         john
        --- On Tue, 1/2/11, NIGEL <nigel.smythe@...> wrote:

        From: NIGEL <nigel.smythe@...>
        Subject: [Enfield] Enfield Trials & Woodsman
        To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, 1 February, 2011, 9:13

         
        May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.

        I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.

        Regards

        Nigel

        ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.


      • Pete Snidal
        ... I wouldn t worry at all about any of the new Unit Construction models. The older cast-iron units, which changed hardly at all since 1955, except perhaps
        Message 3 of 25 , Feb 1, 2011
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          > I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes
          > which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new
          > engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a
          > weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.

          I wouldn't worry at all about any of the new Unit Construction
          models. The older cast-iron units, which changed hardly at all since
          1955, except perhaps to degrade in quality due to worn-out tooling,
          bear only a passing resemblance to the new UCEs.

          >I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound
          >of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start
          >the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike
          >when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit
          >daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.

          Trust me; 70mph on a motorcycle is a much more
          confidence-inspiring and stable experience than 30 on a
          pushbike! But DO take a comprehensive riding course! Other than
          that, it's a way of life'; you'll wonder how you wasted so much time sans moto!

          And a good start to the whole experience might be my manual. (ahem!)

          ps www.enfield.20m.com





          >Regards
          >
          >Nigel
          >
          >ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient
          >training company please let me know.
          >
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------
          >
          >Your personal settings are at:
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          >Our old messages are at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/royalenfield/messages
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          >royalenfield-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
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        • billybuckjobob
          Take Pete s advice. It is sound. Some lessons and his Manual are good investments. Don t be foolish or careless. That is for youngsters. But, I always say,
          Message 4 of 25 , Feb 1, 2011
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            Take Pete's advice. It is sound. Some lessons and his Manual are good investments. Don't be foolish or careless. That is for youngsters. But, I always say, there are two types of riders. There are those who have fallen and those who will fall. The choice is usually a matter of circumstances. Be careful at all times and in all directions. There are a lot of distracted, inattentive drivers out there. Don't be one of them....... Malcolm aka Billybuckjobob.

            --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@...> wrote:
            >
            > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
            >
            > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
            >
            > Regards
            >
            > Nigel
            >
            > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
            >
          • Dave Murray
            The Royal Enfield is the safest motorcycle you can buy. It can just barely kill you. DWM
            Message 5 of 25 , Feb 1, 2011
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              The Royal Enfield is the safest motorcycle you can buy. It can just barely kill you.
              DWM

              --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@...> wrote:
              >
              > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
              >
              > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
              >
              > Regards
              >
              > Nigel
              >
              > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
              >
            • Vinx
              Btw, Dave, ibtd; cos, fwiw, imho, and fyi, i say th re is a v. safe bike. Great balance. How else would i manage to do a sweeping turn on it, a turn which
              Message 6 of 25 , Feb 2, 2011
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                Btw, Dave,
                ibtd; 'cos, fwiw, imho, and fyi, i say th re is a v. safe bike.
                Great balance. How else would i manage to do a sweeping turn on it,
                a turn which includes pivoting th bike on th fixed footrest, and
                Still be safe?! Nope. That's th only reason i ride th bike,
                because some sensible chaps in ancient times did their homework well.



                --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@...> wrote:
                >
                > The Royal Enfield is the safest motorcycle you can buy. It can just barely kill you.
                > DWM
                >
                > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                > >
                > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                > >
                > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                > >
                > > Regards
                > >
                > > Nigel
                > >
                > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
              • Dave Murray
                My point exactly, the RE is so safe (and so slow) that if the rider really screws up, he only ends up barely dead. DWM
                Message 7 of 25 , Feb 4, 2011
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                  My point exactly, the RE is so safe (and so slow) that if the rider really screws up, he only ends up barely dead.
                  DWM

                  --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Vinx" <vinxr@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Btw, Dave,
                  > ibtd; 'cos, fwiw, imho, and fyi, i say th re is a v. safe bike.
                  > Great balance. How else would i manage to do a sweeping turn on it,
                  > a turn which includes pivoting th bike on th fixed footrest, and
                  > Still be safe?! Nope. That's th only reason i ride th bike,
                  > because some sensible chaps in ancient times did their homework well.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > The Royal Enfield is the safest motorcycle you can buy. It can just barely kill you.
                  > > DWM
                  > >
                  > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                  > > >
                  > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                  > > >
                  > > > Regards
                  > > >
                  > > > Nigel
                  > > >
                  > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                  >
                • Vinx
                  Dave, you mean 120kmph is Slow?! Maybe on uncluttered highways out of India. But to get killed? No way. Hell, i ve seen people die at half that speed on bikes
                  Message 8 of 25 , Feb 5, 2011
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                    Dave, you mean 120kmph is Slow?!
                    Maybe on uncluttered highways out of India. But to get killed? No way.
                    Hell, i've seen people die at half that speed on bikes that handle
                    terribly. Here's something for th naysayers, and for th diefasters:
                    http://www.autoplugged.com/news-and-events/royal-enfield-planning-to-bring-650-700cc-parallel-twins/



                    --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > My point exactly, the RE is so safe (and so slow) that if the rider really screws up, he only ends up barely dead.
                    > DWM
                    >
                    > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Vinx" <vinxr@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Btw, Dave,
                    > > ibtd; 'cos, fwiw, imho, and fyi, i say th re is a v. safe bike.
                    > > Great balance. How else would i manage to do a sweeping turn on it,
                    > > a turn which includes pivoting th bike on th fixed footrest, and
                    > > Still be safe?! Nope. That's th only reason i ride th bike,
                    > > because some sensible chaps in ancient times did their homework well.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > The Royal Enfield is the safest motorcycle you can buy. It can just barely kill you.
                    > > > DWM
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Regards
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Nigel
                    > > > >
                    > > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                  • Dave Murray
                    I ve been taking the piss, mate. You can get seriously killed at a walking pace, if you hit your head just so. There s no such thing as barely dead. Is 120
                    Message 9 of 25 , Feb 5, 2011
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                      I've been taking the piss, mate.
                      You can get seriously killed at a walking pace, if you hit your head just so. There's no such thing as "barely dead."
                      Is 120 km/hr slow? Depends on your frame of reference. It would be suicidal in a Mumbai rush hour. On US highways, 130-140 km/hr is pretty normal, and you get passed at that, so virtually every car and motorcycle here will top 160 km/hr. I've had the Thruxton to 195 km/hr, and the 350cc 'Macchi will hold 120 easily. The 500 RE will touch 120 km/hr, but it's unwise to stay there very long.
                      This is all moot, really. Sir Stirling Moss once said; "Speed isn't a number on a dial, speed is entering a 20 mph corner at 22 mph." We've all been THERE!
                      What scares me is that many people think a small bike or a scooter is safe. The size of your ride means nothing. What counts is the size of the vehicle that hits you.
                      Best,
                      DWM

                      --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Vinx" <vinxr@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Dave, you mean 120kmph is Slow?!
                      > Maybe on uncluttered highways out of India. But to get killed? No way.
                      > Hell, i've seen people die at half that speed on bikes that handle
                      > terribly. Here's something for th naysayers, and for th diefasters:
                      > http://www.autoplugged.com/news-and-events/royal-enfield-planning-to-bring-650-700cc-parallel-twins/
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > My point exactly, the RE is so safe (and so slow) that if the rider really screws up, he only ends up barely dead.
                      > > DWM
                      > >
                      > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Vinx" <vinxr@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Btw, Dave,
                      > > > ibtd; 'cos, fwiw, imho, and fyi, i say th re is a v. safe bike.
                      > > > Great balance. How else would i manage to do a sweeping turn on it,
                      > > > a turn which includes pivoting th bike on th fixed footrest, and
                      > > > Still be safe?! Nope. That's th only reason i ride th bike,
                      > > > because some sensible chaps in ancient times did their homework well.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                      > > > >
                      > > > > The Royal Enfield is the safest motorcycle you can buy. It can just barely kill you.
                      > > > > DWM
                      > > > >
                      > > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Regards
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Nigel
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                      >
                    • Vinx
                      You said it, Dave. And i m sure you ll agree that in th middle of a corner at speed, or in a dreadful situash, th strength of one s conviction matters greatly.
                      Message 10 of 25 , Feb 6, 2011
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                        You said it, Dave.
                        And i'm sure you'll agree that in th middle of a corner at speed,
                        or in a dreadful situash, th strength of one's conviction matters
                        greatly. People often land into shit due to flimsy indecisiveness.
                        As for riding at 120kmph, i've done at least that speed on other
                        bikes, and most felt like they were going to kill me asap; not so on
                        th Bullet. It's not advisable though if one does not want to break th
                        engine, with it's Achilles heel of th floating bush assy. made badly.



                        --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I've been taking the piss, mate.
                        > You can get seriously killed at a walking pace, if you hit your head just so. There's no such thing as "barely dead."
                        > Is 120 km/hr slow? Depends on your frame of reference. It would be suicidal in a Mumbai rush hour. On US highways, 130-140 km/hr is pretty normal, and you get passed at that, so virtually every car and motorcycle here will top 160 km/hr. I've had the Thruxton to 195 km/hr, and the 350cc 'Macchi will hold 120 easily. The 500 RE will touch 120 km/hr, but it's unwise to stay there very long.
                        > This is all moot, really. Sir Stirling Moss once said; "Speed isn't a number on a dial, speed is entering a 20 mph corner at 22 mph." We've all been THERE!
                        > What scares me is that many people think a small bike or a scooter is safe. The size of your ride means nothing. What counts is the size of the vehicle that hits you.
                        > Best,
                        > DWM
                        >
                        > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Vinx" <vinxr@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Dave, you mean 120kmph is Slow?!
                        > > Maybe on uncluttered highways out of India. But to get killed? No way.
                        > > Hell, i've seen people die at half that speed on bikes that handle
                        > > terribly. Here's something for th naysayers, and for th diefasters:
                        > > http://www.autoplugged.com/news-and-events/royal-enfield-planning-to-bring-650-700cc-parallel-twins/
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > My point exactly, the RE is so safe (and so slow) that if the rider really screws up, he only ends up barely dead.
                        > > > DWM
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Vinx" <vinxr@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Btw, Dave,
                        > > > > ibtd; 'cos, fwiw, imho, and fyi, i say th re is a v. safe bike.
                        > > > > Great balance. How else would i manage to do a sweeping turn on it,
                        > > > > a turn which includes pivoting th bike on th fixed footrest, and
                        > > > > Still be safe?! Nope. That's th only reason i ride th bike,
                        > > > > because some sensible chaps in ancient times did their homework well.
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > The Royal Enfield is the safest motorcycle you can buy. It can just barely kill you.
                        > > > > > DWM
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Regards
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Nigel
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                      • John Halford
                        i ride my bike to see this world, not the next. ... From: Dave Murray Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman To:
                        Message 11 of 25 , Feb 6, 2011
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                          i ride my bike to see this world, not the next.

                          --- On Sat, 5/2/11, Dave Murray <redhawk34@...> wrote:

                          From: Dave Murray <redhawk34@...>
                          Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                          To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Saturday, 5 February, 2011, 23:38

                           
                          I've been taking the piss, mate.
                          You can get seriously killed at a walking pace, if you hit your head just so. There's no such thing as "barely dead."
                          Is 120 km/hr slow? Depends on your frame of reference. It would be suicidal in a Mumbai rush hour. On US highways, 130-140 km/hr is pretty normal, and you get passed at that, so virtually every car and motorcycle here will top 160 km/hr. I've had the Thruxton to 195 km/hr, and the 350cc 'Macchi will hold 120 easily. The 500 RE will touch 120 km/hr, but it's unwise to stay there very long.
                          This is all moot, really. Sir Stirling Moss once said; "Speed isn't a number on a dial, speed is entering a 20 mph corner at 22 mph." We've all been THERE!
                          What scares me is that many people think a small bike or a scooter is safe. The size of your ride means nothing. What counts is the size of the vehicle that hits you.
                          Best,
                          DWM

                          --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Vinx" <vinxr@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Dave, you mean 120kmph is Slow?!
                          > Maybe on uncluttered highways out of India. But to get killed? No way.
                          > Hell, i've seen people die at half that speed on bikes that handle
                          > terribly. Here's something for th naysayers, and for th diefasters:
                          > http://www.autoplugged.com/news-and-events/royal-enfield-planning-to-bring-650-700cc-parallel-twins/
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > My point exactly, the RE is so safe (and so slow) that if the rider really screws up, he only ends up barely dead.
                          > > DWM
                          > >
                          > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Vinx" <vinxr@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Btw, Dave,
                          > > > ibtd; 'cos, fwiw, imho, and fyi, i say th re is a v. safe bike.
                          > > > Great balance. How else would i manage to do a sweeping turn on it,
                          > > > a turn which includes pivoting th bike on th fixed footrest, and
                          > > > Still be safe?! Nope. That's th only reason i ride th bike,
                          > > > because some sensible chaps in ancient times did their homework well.
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > The Royal Enfield is the safest motorcycle you can buy. It can just barely kill you.
                          > > > > DWM
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Regards
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Nigel
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                          >


                        • billybuckjobob
                          The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph,
                          Message 12 of 25 , Feb 7, 2011
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                            The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.

                            --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                            >
                            > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                            >
                            > Regards
                            >
                            > Nigel
                            >
                            > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                            >
                          • Vinx
                            True. But, a spanner in th works, is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that. That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.
                            Message 13 of 25 , Feb 7, 2011
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                              True. But, a spanner in th works,
                              is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                              That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.



                              --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                              >
                              > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                              > >
                              > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                              > >
                              > > Regards
                              > >
                              > > Nigel
                              > >
                              > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                              > >
                              >
                            • John Halford
                              you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G ... From: Vinx
                              Message 14 of 25 , Feb 7, 2011
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                                you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G

                                --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Vinx <vinxr@...> wrote:

                                From: Vinx <vinxr@...>
                                Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 18:40

                                 
                                True. But, a spanner in th works,
                                is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                                That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.

                                --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                                >
                                > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                                > >
                                > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                                > >
                                > > Regards
                                > >
                                > > Nigel
                                > >
                                > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                                > >
                                >


                              • Dave Murray
                                I believe in riding very fast, changing lanes every 10 seconds, without signalling (keeps them guessing.) It s like hunting bunnies. It s easier to hit a
                                Message 15 of 25 , Feb 7, 2011
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                                  I believe in riding very fast, changing lanes every 10 seconds, without signalling (keeps them guessing.) It's like hunting bunnies. It's easier to hit a sitting bunny than a running one. And I am the damn BUNNY!
                                  It ain't paranoia if they really ARE trying to kill you!
                                  DWM

                                  --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, John Halford <tigerhalford@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G
                                  >
                                  > --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Vinx <vinxr@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > From: Vinx <vinxr@...>
                                  > Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                  > To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 18:40
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >  
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > True. But, a spanner in th works,
                                  > is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                                  > That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.
                                  >
                                  > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Regards
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Nigel
                                  > > >
                                  > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • billybuckjobob
                                  Regarding motorcycling, my principles guide me to believe very few people would deliberately do me harm whilst riding my motorcycle, therefore, it follows that
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Feb 7, 2011
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                                    Regarding motorcycling, my principles guide me to believe very few people would deliberately do me harm whilst riding my motorcycle, therefore, it follows that anyone who might present such a threat of striking me will do it out of neglect/inattentiveness. Given this, I believe that my responsibility is then extended to cover their moves. While no one can predict everyone's moves, I do believe that one can make evaluations of the individual movements of motorists as long as one is advancing among them at a reasonable speed such as will allow one to assess threats as one progresses. I prefer to drive faster, by a little, than 90% of traffic on highways. On local roads, I reduce that to about 80% and I use a lot of my lane so as to draw attention to myself. I have been cut off on a few occasions but was always able to salvage the situation, knock on wood. The few accidents I have had which involved other motor vehicles were my fault despite there having been errors on the part of the other driver which brought the whole event into play. Had I been attentive and not looking at girls in bikinis or any other such thing, I would have been aware of the idiot's choice.

                                    --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I believe in riding very fast, changing lanes every 10 seconds, without signalling (keeps them guessing.) It's like hunting bunnies. It's easier to hit a sitting bunny than a running one. And I am the damn BUNNY!
                                    > It ain't paranoia if they really ARE trying to kill you!
                                    > DWM
                                    >
                                    > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, John Halford <tigerhalford@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G
                                    > >
                                    > > --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Vinx <vinxr@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > From: Vinx <vinxr@>
                                    > > Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                    > > To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                    > > Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 18:40
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >  
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > True. But, a spanner in th works,
                                    > > is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                                    > > That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.
                                    > >
                                    > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@> wrote:
                                    > > >
                                    > > > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                                    > > >
                                    > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Regards
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > Nigel
                                    > > > >
                                    > > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                                    > > > >
                                    > > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • billybuckjobob
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Feb 7, 2011
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                                      ...and, I might also add that, on one occasion, as I was driving along at about 70 mph in a pickup, as I was about to change into the middle lane after passing a vehicle, I was passed by a motorcycle on my right side (illegal passing) at probably 40 or 50 mph faster than I was traveling. I had begun to make my return to the middle lane when the motorcycle passed sooo closely that I was buffeted by his wind!. I am afraid, I would have spit on on his body had I struck him and not been killed myself. Like aviators, there are old riders and there are bold drivers but there are damn few old, bold drivers..... Ride smart and with respect for other motorist's welfare.

                                      --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > I believe in riding very fast, changing lanes every 10 seconds, without signalling (keeps them guessing.) It's like hunting bunnies. It's easier to hit a sitting bunny than a running one. And I am the damn BUNNY!
                                      > It ain't paranoia if they really ARE trying to kill you!
                                      > DWM
                                      >
                                      > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, John Halford <tigerhalford@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G
                                      > >
                                      > > --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Vinx <vinxr@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > From: Vinx <vinxr@>
                                      > > Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                      > > To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                      > > Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 18:40
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >  
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > True. But, a spanner in th works,
                                      > > is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                                      > > That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.
                                      > >
                                      > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@> wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                                      > > >
                                      > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > Regards
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > Nigel
                                      > > > >
                                      > > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                                      > > > >
                                      > > >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                    • Dave Murray
                                      Ah but if you HAD wanted to hit him, he gained the element of surprise by doing the unexpected (and,if strictly speaking, illegal.) By holding 110-120, he
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Feb 7, 2011
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                                        Ah but if you HAD wanted to hit him, he gained the element of surprise by doing the unexpected (and,if strictly speaking, illegal.) By holding 110-120, he reduced his time in the danger zone considerably. That's just good, safe riding tactics, like riding on the right side of a tractor-trailer, so that his bulk protects you from everybody else.
                                        DWM

                                        --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > ...and, I might also add that, on one occasion, as I was driving along at about 70 mph in a pickup, as I was about to change into the middle lane after passing a vehicle, I was passed by a motorcycle on my right side (illegal passing) at probably 40 or 50 mph faster than I was traveling. I had begun to make my return to the middle lane when the motorcycle passed sooo closely that I was buffeted by his wind!. I am afraid, I would have spit on on his body had I struck him and not been killed myself. Like aviators, there are old riders and there are bold drivers but there are damn few old, bold drivers..... Ride smart and with respect for other motorist's welfare.
                                        >
                                        > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > I believe in riding very fast, changing lanes every 10 seconds, without signalling (keeps them guessing.) It's like hunting bunnies. It's easier to hit a sitting bunny than a running one. And I am the damn BUNNY!
                                        > > It ain't paranoia if they really ARE trying to kill you!
                                        > > DWM
                                        > >
                                        > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, John Halford <tigerhalford@> wrote:
                                        > > >
                                        > > > you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G
                                        > > >
                                        > > > --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Vinx <vinxr@> wrote:
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > From: Vinx <vinxr@>
                                        > > > Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                        > > > To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                        > > > Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 18:40
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >  
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > > > True. But, a spanner in th works,
                                        > > > is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                                        > > > That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.
                                        > > >
                                        > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@> wrote:
                                        > > > >
                                        > > > > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                                        > > > >
                                        > > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                                        > > > > >
                                        > > > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                                        > > > > >
                                        > > > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                                        > > > > >
                                        > > > > > Regards
                                        > > > > >
                                        > > > > > Nigel
                                        > > > > >
                                        > > > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                                        > > > > >
                                        > > > >
                                        > > >
                                        > >
                                        >
                                      • billybuckjobob
                                        I believe that as you increase your speed relative to the speed of other traffic you increase the odds of having or causing an accident. In any case, the
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Feb 8, 2011
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                                          I believe that as you increase your speed relative to the speed of other traffic you increase the odds of having or causing an accident. In any case, the surprise factor of passing a slower vehicle is uncivil. have a look here: http://www.snopes.com/photos/accident/tulsacrash.asp


                                          --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Murray" <redhawk34@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I believe in riding very fast, changing lanes every 10 seconds, without signalling (keeps them guessing.) It's like hunting bunnies. It's easier to hit a sitting bunny than a running one. And I am the damn BUNNY!
                                          > It ain't paranoia if they really ARE trying to kill you!
                                          > DWM
                                          >
                                          > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, John Halford <tigerhalford@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > > you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G
                                          > >
                                          > > --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Vinx <vinxr@> wrote:
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > From: Vinx <vinxr@>
                                          > > Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                          > > To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                          > > Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 18:40
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >  
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > True. But, a spanner in th works,
                                          > > is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                                          > > That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.
                                          > >
                                          > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@> wrote:
                                          > > >
                                          > > > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                                          > > >
                                          > > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                                          > > > >
                                          > > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                                          > > > >
                                          > > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                                          > > > >
                                          > > > > Regards
                                          > > > >
                                          > > > > Nigel
                                          > > > >
                                          > > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                                          > > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > >
                                          >
                                        • John Halford
                                          is this a joke? ... From: Dave Murray Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com Date: Monday, 7
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Feb 8, 2011
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                                            is this a joke?

                                            --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Dave Murray <redhawk34@...> wrote:

                                            From: Dave Murray <redhawk34@...>
                                            Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                            To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                            Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 22:31

                                             
                                            I believe in riding very fast, changing lanes every 10 seconds, without signalling (keeps them guessing.) It's like hunting bunnies. It's easier to hit a sitting bunny than a running one. And I am the damn BUNNY!
                                            It ain't paranoia if they really ARE trying to kill you!
                                            DWM

                                            --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, John Halford <tigerhalford@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G
                                            >
                                            > --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Vinx <vinxr@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > From: Vinx <vinxr@...>
                                            > Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                            > To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                            > Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 18:40
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >  
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > True. But, a spanner in th works,
                                            > is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                                            > That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.
                                            >
                                            > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                                            > >
                                            > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                                            > > >
                                            > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Regards
                                            > > >
                                            > > > Nigel
                                            > > >
                                            > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                                            > > >
                                            > >
                                            >


                                          • Derek H. Wood
                                            Good Morning Friends. It is interesting to see, (in the clipped message below), that a motorcyclist will admit to making a mistake, whether intentionally, or
                                            Message 21 of 25 , Feb 8, 2011
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                                              Good Morning Friends.
                                               
                                              It is interesting to see, (in the clipped message below), that a motorcyclist will admit to making a mistake, whether intentionally, or accidentally.  I don't think any of us are guiltless in that respect, I know I'm certainly not, but hopefully, one 'lives and learns'.
                                               
                                              However, I've yet to meet a car driver who has not been extremely upset if anyone mentions that they are not a good driver.  A great many are definitely not.  (I try to be, but have failed on several occasions).  Tell a car driver that they are a danger to other road users and the effect is usually the same as if, for instance, you tell him that you've just murdered his entire family.  It's very odd.
                                               
                                              I've been 'biking since the age of 16 and I'm still riding at the age of 72, sometimes with my wife as pillion, both here and on the Continent.  Having over the course of that time been involved in several road accidents, mostly my fault and generally caused by going too fast in inappropriate places.   Virtually all took place in my younger days and involved things that jumped out at me, such as fences, curbs and assorted road furniture, which you'd imagine would remain static !
                                               
                                              With more care and a goodly slice of luck, both my wife and I are still in this world and not exploring the next.  I must state here that my wife also holds a U.K. motorcycle licence and has NEVER had a road accident, even during her solo riding days.
                                               
                                              Unfortunately it's a fact of life, that 'to err is human'.
                                               
                                              Very Best Regards.
                                               
                                              I.H.D. - (Derek).
                                               
                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 11:11 PM
                                              Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman

                                               

                                              Regarding motorcycling, my principles guide me to believe very few people would deliberately do me harm whilst riding my motorcycle, therefore, it follows that anyone who might present such a threat of striking me will do it out of neglect/inattentiveness. Given this, I believe that my responsibility is then extended to cover their moves. While no one can predict everyone's moves, I do believe that one can make evaluations of the individual movements of motorists as long as one is advancing among them at a > > >
                                              > >
                                              >

                                            • billybuckjobob
                                              Thank you for using my message and chiming in. Since you clipped my passage, I d like to point out something which I think you well represent when I wrote,
                                              Message 22 of 25 , Feb 8, 2011
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                                                Thank you for using my message and chiming in. Since you "clipped" my passage, I'd like to point out something which I think you well represent when I wrote, Like aviators, "There are bold riders and there are old riders but there very few old, bold riders". Thank you for chiming in.
                                                Now 60 and, having started when I was about 17 years of age, I carefully avoid the habits or practices which caused me to fall or collide in my wilder youth. I also avoid drugs and alcohol.For many years I rode in all weather, sun, rain and snow. Now, I am pretty much a fair weather rider. While I am aware that some motorists are distracted, it does not dismiss the rider's responsibility for looking out for himself as if he were being hunted, as in war.

                                                --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Derek H. Wood" <derekandmavis@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Good Morning Friends.
                                                >
                                                > It is interesting to see, (in the clipped message below), that a motorcyclist will admit to making a mistake, whether intentionally, or accidentally. I don't think any of us are guiltless in that respect, I know I'm certainly not, but hopefully, one 'lives and learns'.
                                                >
                                                > However, I've yet to meet a car driver who has not been extremely upset if anyone mentions that they are not a good driver. A great many are definitely not. (I try to be, but have failed on several occasions). Tell a car driver that they are a danger to other road users and the effect is usually the same as if, for instance, you tell him that you've just murdered his entire family. It's very odd.
                                                >
                                                > I've been 'biking since the age of 16 and I'm still riding at the age of 72, sometimes with my wife as pillion, both here and on the Continent. Having over the course of that time been involved in several road accidents, mostly my fault and generally caused by going too fast in inappropriate places. Virtually all took place in my younger days and involved things that jumped out at me, such as fences, curbs and assorted road furniture, which you'd imagine would remain static !
                                                >
                                                > With more care and a goodly slice of luck, both my wife and I are still in this world and not exploring the next. I must state here that my wife also holds a U.K. motorcycle licence and has NEVER had a road accident, even during her solo riding days.
                                                >
                                                > Unfortunately it's a fact of life, that 'to err is human'.
                                                >
                                                > Very Best Regards.
                                                >
                                                > I.H.D. - (Derek).
                                                >
                                                > ----- Original Message -----
                                                > From: billybuckjobob
                                                > To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                                > Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 11:11 PM
                                                > Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                                >
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > Regarding motorcycling, my principles guide me to believe very few people would deliberately do me harm whilst riding my motorcycle, therefore, it follows that anyone who might present such a threat of striking me will do it out of neglect/inattentiveness. Given this, I believe that my responsibility is then extended to cover their moves. While no one can predict everyone's moves, I do believe that one can make evaluations of the individual movements of motorists as long as one is advancing among them at a > > >
                                                > > >
                                                > >
                                                >
                                              • Dave Murray
                                                Would I do that? DWM
                                                Message 23 of 25 , Feb 8, 2011
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                                                  Would I do that?
                                                  DWM

                                                  --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, John Halford <tigerhalford@...> wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > is this a joke?
                                                • Vinx
                                                  Yea, John. And we have a rider walloped. And th next thing is th ob. Blood And Gore Galore , Unless of course, th rider just sees stars. It s sad we re flesh
                                                  Message 24 of 25 , Feb 8, 2011
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                                                    Yea, John. And we have a rider walloped.
                                                    And th next thing is th ob. 'Blood And Gore Galore',
                                                    Unless of course, th rider just sees stars.
                                                    It's sad we're flesh and blood. And so full of crap. I've often wished
                                                    i was just a character on Cartoon Network. Thank God for Wodehouse.




                                                    --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, John Halford <tigerhalford@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > you can be the safest, slowest bike rider in the world, but that dont stop a car taking you out.  john.   1947 model G
                                                    >
                                                    > --- On Mon, 7/2/11, Vinx <vinxr@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > From: Vinx <vinxr@...>
                                                    > Subject: [Enfield] Re: Enfield Trials & Woodsman
                                                    > To: royalenfield@yahoogroups.com
                                                    > Date: Monday, 7 February, 2011, 18:40
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >  
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > True. But, a spanner in th works,
                                                    > is a spanner in th works. No two ways about that.
                                                    > That said, i guess one has to adapt to th machine, to eliminate error.
                                                    >
                                                    > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "billybuckjobob" <islsail@> wrote:
                                                    > >
                                                    > > The most confidence inspiring motorcycle I have ridden was my R100. It was solid as a rock up to about 120 mph. I drove for an hour across Georgia at 100 mph, concerned only about wildlife crossing the savannah. The scariest was a 903 kawasaki that set up a speed wobble at 115 mph and scared the ---- out of me. Any bike can go fast for the conditions. The matter of greatest concern, however, is the driver. He(or she) is the most crucial element. I believe that 90% of motorcycle accidents are based on rider error and very rarely the fault of the machine.
                                                    > >
                                                    > > --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "NIGEL" <nigel.smythe@> wrote:
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > May seem like a daft question but is there much difference between the Woodsman & the Trials aprt from the obvious tyres, exhaust and seat. I'm starting out on my motorcycle training at nearly 44 years old. I have never been on a bike before and have only had the insentive to do so after seeing the new Enfield Trials. I keep hearing about there ability to breakdown every five minutes which is a bit off putting, which is why i'm looking at the new engine model, I don't mind a bit of work but this is going to be a weekend bike for when i feel like a ride out.
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > I have since looked at the Truimphs as well, but just love the sound of the single cylinder engine as well as the ability to kick start the bike, i'm not into speed in fact the thought of 50 mph on a bike when the fastest i've been on a pushbike is probably 20, seems a bit daunting any advice would be greatly apreciated.
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > Regards
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > Nigel
                                                    > > >
                                                    > > > ps anyone in Shrewsbury Shropshire uk can recommend a good patient training company please let me know.
                                                  • JohnM
                                                    ... This is akin to my favourite bits of advice I give to more inexperienced riders who ask me for riding tips. NEVER MAKE AN ASSUMPTION. Never assume the car
                                                    Message 25 of 25 , Feb 9, 2011
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                                                      > Given this, I believe that my responsibility is then extended to >cover their moves. While no one can predict everyone's moves, I do >believe that one can make evaluations of the individual movements of >motorists as long as one is advancing among them at a >

                                                      This is akin to my favourite bits of advice I give to more inexperienced riders who ask me for riding tips.

                                                      NEVER MAKE AN ASSUMPTION.

                                                      Never assume the car driver has seen you, never assume you have right of way, never assume the road is clear just around the bend, never assume your tyres are at the right pressure etc. etc. etc.

                                                      The other one is:

                                                      NEVER RIDE FASTER THAN WHAT YOU CAN SEE.

                                                      This all doesn't mean that you can't have fun. It just means that your survival is up to you and not to assume other drivers (or riders) have any obligation to save your ass (even if they are incompetant or blind)

                                                      Unfortunately, I find the hardness of the bitumen is inversely proportional to my age for some reason.

                                                      JohnM
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