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Re: Royal Enfield Photos

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  • Robert Farnsworth
    ... have lost their way. I wonder if young people in India will Like it. Bob
    Message 1 of 31 , Dec 1, 2007
      --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, "Victor Azifukare"
      <drummond1999@...> wrote:
      >
      > Great Photos well done I like the BMW 800 but the Enfields seem to
      have lost their way. I wonder if young people in India will Like it.
      Bob
    • Larry Fisher
      Thanks Pete - My whole point was, if the dealer and the rider use some common sense and the dealer wants to invest a little in making the sale, there is no
      Message 31 of 31 , Dec 5, 2007
        Thanks Pete -

        My whole point was, if the dealer and the rider use some common sense and the dealer wants to invest a little in making the sale, there is no reason why dealers would not want to do test rides. I've been riding since I was twelve, when I walked into the dealer to look at that BMW I was thirty-six, yet he took the same precautions and took the time to evaluate my capabilities as he would with any customer who was not well known to him. That's an investment in building a relationship with your customer.

        As for the dealer in the story that started this thread - the dealer deserved what he got - a mess. Why? because he was irresponsible and he created the situation that lead to the accident. He's selling the bikes - then again, if he stops doing test rides, maybe he's not selling many bikes.... up to him to determine what business model works.

        Personally, I would never buy a bike I did not have a chance to ride - or at least return - after the first few miles. As for Customer A - a test ride sounds like it might be in order (grin).

        Pete Snidal <snidey@...> wrote:
        >But how many deaths can Dealer B tolerate in his business model (or his
        >insurance company's business model). And can these be screened against?

        Seems to me that screening is the most important element in making a decision.
        If you have to schedule a motorcycle riding course to determine the
        skill level of
        the prospect, you'd have to have a lot of extra time on your hands -
        or have an
        ulterior motive, eg the prospect is a foxy divorcee with time on her
        - uh - hands.

        If, otoh, the prospect is already known to you as an active
        motorcyclist, and rides
        into your shop on a well-maintained yet experienced motorcycle, it seems to me
        that s/he'd be a good risk factor.

        I might go with customer B, but don't have time for Customer A. (Well, maybe
        A (ii).........) (grin)






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