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Re: [Enfield] Charging Circuit

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  • Al
    The dielectric grease suggestion for protecting electrical contacts is a good one; however, it might not be corrosion at all that is the source of your
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 1, 2007
      The dielectric grease suggestion for protecting
      electrical contacts is a good one; however, it might
      not be corrosion at all that is the source of your
      problem. Your rectifier,regulator, or wiring harness
      could be suffering from an internal fault. The
      manipulation of them, when you clean the contacts,
      could be what is actually causing a "correction" of
      the problem. You might wish to wiggle that portion of
      the harness or tap on the regulator and rectifier to
      see if it brings about the charging problem; or, when
      it occurs on its own, correct it without the cleaning
      of the contacts.


      --- fiferwd@... wrote:

      > 1. Get a great big tube of dialectric grease
      >
      > 2. Smear a bit on everything that looks like an
      > electrical connection.
      >
      >
      >
      > **************************************
      > See what's new at http://www.aol.com
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been
      > removed]
      >
      >




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    • mrunderhill1975a
      My charging circuit quit again today, and when I wiggled the wiring harnes between the rectifier and regulator it immediately started charging. So, Al, you
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 2, 2007
        My charging circuit quit again today, and when I wiggled the wiring
        harnes between the rectifier and regulator it immediately started
        charging. So, Al, you are right, it is an internal fault with one of
        the wires. I will try to track it down tomorrow. Any suggestions on
        how to find the specific wire? Or, should I just cut to the chase and
        buy a new regulator/rectifier?

        --- In royalenfield@yahoogroups.com, Al <k3eax@...> wrote:
        >
        > The dielectric grease suggestion for protecting
        > electrical contacts is a good one; however, it might
        > not be corrosion at all that is the source of your
        > problem. Your rectifier,regulator, or wiring harness
        > could be suffering from an internal fault. The
        > manipulation of them, when you clean the contacts,
        > could be what is actually causing a "correction" of
        > the problem. You might wish to wiggle that portion of
        > the harness or tap on the regulator and rectifier to
        > see if it brings about the charging problem; or, when
        > it occurs on its own, correct it without the cleaning
        > of the contacts.
        >
      • Al
        How do you locate an unseen fault in a group of wires in close proximity : That is a good question! Here are a few thoughts and suggestions. First, when doing
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 3, 2007
          "How do you locate an unseen fault in a group of
          wires in close proximity": That is a good question!
          Here are a few thoughts and suggestions.

          First, when doing the wiggle-test, it is difficult to
          control the extent of the wiggle. And so, you cannot
          be absolutely sure that the fault lies in he wires
          bettween the rectifier and regulator. It may be in the
          input/output connector or wires that enter and leave
          the rectifier/regulator.

          Second, these wires are stranded copper and as such
          very, very, very rarely break unless they rub against
          another wire, chafe against a component, or are burnt.
          And if this were to happen, you would visually be
          able to identify the breakage spot. Since you made no
          mention of damage, I believe this has not happened.

          Third, if the miscreant electrical connection is
          internal, that is to say, inside the rectifier or
          regulator, you have no option but to replace.

          Fourth, before forking-over $60 plus another $15 for
          shipping and handling, I would do the following
          continuity test.

          Purchase some dress-makers pins; these are "T-shaped
          and somewhat heavier in gauge to other pins. Remove
          from the machine and separate the rectifier and
          regulator. Then ,with your VOM set to read resistance,
          test for continuity in each of the conductors by
          placing a pin through the wire's insulation near the
          point where it enters the rectifier or regulator to
          create a connection for one of the meter's probes and
          then placing the other probe on the brass fitting
          located in the nylon connector that is the other end
          of the pierced wire. Wiggle this wire and note the
          meter's reading. Any deviation from continuity to high
          resistance/infinity would indicate a problem with that
          wire or its connector. Perform this test with all
          wires concerned.

          If you locate a problem by performing this test and
          must solder-in a new wire close to the unit, remember
          that it is solid-state and vulnerable to heat-damage;
          use some type of heat-sink between the r/r unit and
          you soldering iron. Also, be sure to seal the pin-hole
          by placing a dab of dielectric grease on it.

          I hope this helps.

          Da Nooge



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        • Al
          Whoops! I mispeeled my own name. it should read: Da Noodge
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 3, 2007
            Whoops! I mispeeled my own name. it should read:

            Da Noodge
          • Pete Snidal
            ... If it s the wiring harness connector, it won t make any difference. If it s the reg/rec connector, you ll be replacing the baby with the bathwater. I d
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 4, 2007
              >My charging circuit quit again today, and when I wiggled the wiring
              >harnes between the rectifier and regulator it immediately started
              >charging. So, Al, you are right, it is an internal fault with one of
              >the wires. I will try to track it down tomorrow. Any suggestions on
              >how to find the specific wire? Or, should I just cut to the chase and
              >buy a new regulator/rectifier?

              If it's the wiring harness connector, it won't make any difference. If
              it's the reg/rec connector, you'll be replacing the baby with the bathwater.
              I'd just do a direct solder/shrink tube connect and toss the quick connectors.
              Quick only counts on a production line. You may have to do it once more
              in your lifetime; more probably not.
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