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Blepharitis

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  • tg.edwards@btinternet.com
    Hello Annie, I too am a retired GP, in the south of England and have suffered from Blepharitis for many years ( 20 + ). I remember seeing a film on TV in 1996
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 1, 2010
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      Hello Annie,
      I too am a retired GP, in the south of England and have suffered from Blepharitis for many years ( 20 + ).
      I remember seeing a film on TV in 1996 done by a Swedish photographer called Lennart Nilssen, who did several programmes with medical topics.
      One of the last before he retired was called The Hidden World, which showed several sorts of mites including the house dust mite, and also Demodex Folliculorum, burrowing around in the roots of eyelashes.
      I remember asking an opthalmologist colleague about them and his reply was that they were merely commensals.
      Over the years I have tried all sorts of things to improve the situation with no lasting effect.
      One morning in the surgery I saw three patients all independent of each other and each suffering from scabies, and I prescribed permethrin 5% dermal cream for each of them.
      My eureca moment ensued when I said to myself that I would try it on my eyelashes and found that it improved the situation more than anything else that I had tried previously.
      I visited the British Film Institute who managed to find the film and I viewed it again. ( I even took my camcorder and recorded the section that I was interested in for myself.)
      I wrote to Mr Nilssen, who was pleased that some of his work was still of interest. He is now in his late eighties.
      Like you, I looked at the Internet sites with links to the subject and saw the same articles that you mentioned.
      I visited the Library of the Royal Society of Medicine and found large new Opthalmology Test Books which mentioned the 'controversy'. In one of them is a scanning electron microscope veiw of the base of an eyelash with the 'tail' of a demodex visible alongside it. The specimen having been removed in an eyelid shortening operation. It seems to me that there is increasing evidence that makes the theory irresistable.
      I like you, envisaged doing a 'Study' that I might be able to publish in a Journal. The 'hurdles' and general difficulties seemed to me to be almost insuperable.
      I can only hope that if I write a 'Personal View' and submit it to the British Medical Journal, they might agree to publish it.
      I am dismayed by the situation as I see it at the present time, since it seems to me that 'The Medical Profession', certainly in this country, just doesn't want to know, turns a 'blind eye' and continues to recommend half strength baby shampoo applied daily with a cotton wool bud, which they are fully aware is not likely to have any effect..
      I was studying a Website, www.demodexsolutions.com based in China, where they have clearly been working on this theory for the past thirty years. Their diagram of the Demodex Life Cycle is the best that I have seen. One of the problems seems to be the short duration from Ovum to mature adult creating another Ovum in 240 hours.
      I am not impressed by our lack of interest in the subject in contrast to their industry over many years.
      They too however have their problems, inasmuch as they instruct people to avoid using their ointment anywhere near the eyes ! As also do the Manufacturers of Permethrin dermal cream in this country. ( It does contan small amounts of formaldehyde, which it is clear should not get into the eyes. And if it does, I agree with you that it is essential to wash out the eye with plenty of water immediately.)
      Ivermectin is available in this country on a named patient basis only, and so far I have not been able to find out much about it, sufficient to know whether to take it myself ! My Vetinary colleague, Dr R P Ryder-Davies, says that it 'really works' in animals !
      My present regime is to use Permethrin cream about every three days, in the hope that I will eventually eliminate all mature adults capable of reproducing.
      My method is to apply the cream when I have retired to bed, and finish by applying a small amount to my eyelids, and turn out the light without opening my eyes, until next morning, when I wash it off. In this way it doesn't get into my eyes. Another difficulty in using the cream is that it doesn't really reach the deeper layers of the skin in the region of the sebaceous glands, whereas the scabies mite only burrows under the stratum corneum which is a more superficial structure.
      Enough of my ramblings..
      I am pleased that you have 'cured' your Rosacae.
      I would be interested to hear from you if you have the time. I could even send you a DVD of the film that I made if you wish.
      Best Wishes,
      Graham Edwards
      +441243 514652
      +447831 139062
      tg.edwards@...
    • khm4aim
      I am not on this board as often as in the past, but if you search under my initials, KHM you will find a number of posts where I recorded various trials I have
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 2, 2010
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        I am not on this board as often as in the past, but if you search under my initials, KHM you will find a number of posts where I recorded various trials I have done.

        I trialed a regular use of ivermectin, and in my case it was very helpful and I still take it 2X per month to keep the numbers down.

        I did not have regular eye issues, but did have intractable P&P issues that did not respond well to first line therapies.

        Luckily for me I found a very patient and flexible derm who was willing to trial this and a few other things.

        In any case, there is very little risk of harm using it orally - you may have some discomfort from the initial die off of the mites, but for me that went away after the first 2 times.







        --- In rosacea-support@yahoogroups.com, "tg.edwards@..." <tg.edwards@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello Annie,
        > I too am a retired GP, in the south of England and have suffered from Blepharitis for many years ( 20 + ).
        > I remember seeing a film on TV in 1996 done by a Swedish photographer called Lennart Nilssen, who did several programmes with medical topics.
        > One of the last before he retired was called The Hidden World, which showed several sorts of mites including the house dust mite, and also Demodex Folliculorum, burrowing around in the roots of eyelashes.
        > I remember asking an opthalmologist colleague about them and his reply was that they were merely commensals.
        > Over the years I have tried all sorts of things to improve the situation with no lasting effect.
        > One morning in the surgery I saw three patients all independent of each other and each suffering from scabies, and I prescribed permethrin 5% dermal cream for each of them.
        > My eureca moment ensued when I said to myself that I would try it on my eyelashes and found that it improved the situation more than anything else that I had tried previously.
        > I visited the British Film Institute who managed to find the film and I viewed it again. ( I even took my camcorder and recorded the section that I was interested in for myself.)
        > I wrote to Mr Nilssen, who was pleased that some of his work was still of interest. He is now in his late eighties.
        > Like you, I looked at the Internet sites with links to the subject and saw the same articles that you mentioned.
        > I visited the Library of the Royal Society of Medicine and found large new Opthalmology Test Books which mentioned the 'controversy'. In one of them is a scanning electron microscope veiw of the base of an eyelash with the 'tail' of a demodex visible alongside it. The specimen having been removed in an eyelid shortening operation. It seems to me that there is increasing evidence that makes the theory irresistable.
        > I like you, envisaged doing a 'Study' that I might be able to publish in a Journal. The 'hurdles' and general difficulties seemed to me to be almost insuperable.
        > I can only hope that if I write a 'Personal View' and submit it to the British Medical Journal, they might agree to publish it.
        > I am dismayed by the situation as I see it at the present time, since it seems to me that 'The Medical Profession', certainly in this country, just doesn't want to know, turns a 'blind eye' and continues to recommend half strength baby shampoo applied daily with a cotton wool bud, which they are fully aware is not likely to have any effect..
        > I was studying a Website, www.demodexsolutions.com based in China, where they have clearly been working on this theory for the past thirty years. Their diagram of the Demodex Life Cycle is the best that I have seen. One of the problems seems to be the short duration from Ovum to mature adult creating another Ovum in 240 hours.
        > I am not impressed by our lack of interest in the subject in contrast to their industry over many years.
        > They too however have their problems, inasmuch as they instruct people to avoid using their ointment anywhere near the eyes ! As also do the Manufacturers of Permethrin dermal cream in this country. ( It does contan small amounts of formaldehyde, which it is clear should not get into the eyes. And if it does, I agree with you that it is essential to wash out the eye with plenty of water immediately.)
        > Ivermectin is available in this country on a named patient basis only, and so far I have not been able to find out much about it, sufficient to know whether to take it myself ! My Vetinary colleague, Dr R P Ryder-Davies, says that it 'really works' in animals !
        > My present regime is to use Permethrin cream about every three days, in the hope that I will eventually eliminate all mature adults capable of reproducing.
        > My method is to apply the cream when I have retired to bed, and finish by applying a small amount to my eyelids, and turn out the light without opening my eyes, until next morning, when I wash it off. In this way it doesn't get into my eyes. Another difficulty in using the cream is that it doesn't really reach the deeper layers of the skin in the region of the sebaceous glands, whereas the scabies mite only burrows under the stratum corneum which is a more superficial structure.
        > Enough of my ramblings..
        > I am pleased that you have 'cured' your Rosacae.
        > I would be interested to hear from you if you have the time. I could even send you a DVD of the film that I made if you wish.
        > Best Wishes,
        > Graham Edwards
        > +441243 514652
        > +447831 139062
        > tg.edwards@...
        >
      • TG EDWARDS
        Hello KHM4aim, Thank you for your helpful note. I will try to find your previous contributions. I will also ask the manufacturers for the data sheet for
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 3, 2010
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          Hello KHM4aim,
          Thank you for your helpful note. I will try to find your previous contributions.
          I will also ask the manufacturers for the data sheet for ivermectin. I find it strange that the information about it is not more readily available.It is interesting to me that so much has been done and that so many people who ought to know about it, are completely ignorant, or just pretend and don't want to know, possibly because of 'work-load' or financial considerations !
          Graham
          01243 514652
          07831 139062
          ffolletts Birdham W Sussex PO20 7QL
          tg.edwards@...
        • Aurelia
          Hi Graham, and welcome to our group! :) ... Have you checked our Rosacea Support Resource Pages: http://rosacea-research.org/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 8, 2010
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            Hi Graham, and welcome to our group! :)

            > I will also ask the manufacturers for the data sheet for ivermectin. I find it strange that the information about it is not more readily available. It is interesting to me that so much has been done and that so many people who ought to know about it, are completely ignorant, or just pretend and don't want to know, possibly because of 'work-load' or financial considerations ! <

            Have you checked our Rosacea Support Resource Pages:
            http://rosacea-research.org/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page

            There are some very interesting links in the Ivermectin section:
            http://rosacea-research.org/wiki/index.php?title=Ivermectin

            Another alternative is crotamiton cream such as Eurax - but NOT one with hydrocortisone because it is best to avoid steroids.
            http://www.patient.co.uk/medicine/Crotamiton.htm

            Kind regards,

            Aurelia
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