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Re: [rootsradicals] Big dummy sizing -- who is riding a 16"?

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  • Doug Van Cleve
    Folks, Thanks to those who have responded. Alas, I think it is making things worse ;^) I was pretty much sold on the 16 , based on TT length and thinking
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 11, 2009
      Folks,

      Thanks to those who have responded.  Alas, I think it is making things worse ;^)  I was pretty much sold on the 16", based on TT length and thinking that by not going too much longer than my road bikes I would have the option of several styles of handlebar (not be locked into ones that sweep back to minimize reach).  I am just under 5'9" with short legs and a proportionally long torso.  Most of you who have responded and are dimensionally similar are riding the 18" or even the 20".  As I mentioned, standover on the 18" would not be an issue and it would be fine with bars that mostly come back from the stem clamp.  I see a lot of BDs with a ton of spacers under the stem and that will obviously be exaggerated by the shorter head tube of the 16" frame.

      My most frequently ridden bike has a 54cm top tube, an ~8.5cm stem and bars with about 10cm reach for a total of ~72.5cm.  I ride at or near the maximum reach point a lot, so that is fine for me.  That would allow a 16" BD (~57cm TT) to have ~15.5cm of stem and bar extension (which might even allow drop bars with a short stem if I wanted to try it) or an 18" (~60cm TT) to have ~12.5cm of stem and bar extension (which would allow a bit of forward reach on the bars, maybe a north road/Albatross type bar but probably not more than that).  I would prefer the bigger frame if both would work well, but would really hate to end up feeling like it is too big and requires a short stem and/or only cruiser bars...

      So I am wondering, who is riding a 16" BD, how tall are you, what size normal bike do you ride and what bar/stem are you using?

      Regards, Doug



    • Morgan Scherer
      I ride a 16 BD. I m 5 8 and have short legs and a long torso. My other bike is a 1969 Raleigh Competition, with swept back handlebars, and it is a 20 . I
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 11, 2009
        I ride a 16" BD. I'm 5"8 and have short legs and a long torso. My other bike is a 1969 Raleigh Competition, with swept back handlebars, and it is a 20". I am using butterfly bars on my BD, and a stem with a fairly steep upward angle. My handlebars are just above the height of my seat.

        Morgan S.


        "Given the remarkable growth in support for gays and lesbians, I think there is a chance that someday recumbents might be accepted" RAAM rider, 2005
        http://simonscherer.blogspot.com
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Doug Van Cleve <dvancleve@...>
        Date: Sunday, Oct 11, 2009 2:03 pm
        Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Big dummy sizing -- who is riding a 16"?
        To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.comReply-To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com



        Folks,

        Thanks to those who have responded. Alas, I think it is making things worse ;^) I was pretty much sold on the 16", based on TT length and thinking that by not going too much longer than my road bikes I would have the option of several styles of handlebar (not be locked into ones that sweep back to minimize reach). I am just under 5'9" with short legs and a proportionally long torso. Most of you who have responded and are dimensionally similar are riding the 18" or even the 20". As I
        mentioned, standover on the 18" would not be an issue and it would be fine with bars that mostly come back from the stem clamp. I see a lot of BDs with a ton of spacers under the stem and that will obviously be exaggerated by the shorter head tube of the 16"
        frame.

        My most frequently ridden bike has a 54cm top tube, an ~8.5cm stem and bars with about 10cm reach for a total of ~72.5cm. I ride at or near the maximum reach point a lot, so that is fine for me. That would allow a 16" BD (~57cm TT) to have ~15.5cm of stem and bar extension (which might even allow drop bars with a short stem if I wanted to try it) or an 18" (~60cm TT) to have ~12.5cm of stem and bar extension (which would allow a bit of forward reach on the bars, maybe a north road/Albatross type bar but probably not more than that). I would prefer the bigger frame if both would work well, but would really hate to end up feeling like it is too big and requires a short stem and/or only cruiser bars...

        So I am wondering, who is riding a 16" BD, how tall are you, what size normal bike do you ride and what bar/stem are you using?

        Regards, Doug








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      • Tone
        Doug, I have a 16” Big Dummy frame with its stock rigid fork and 26” x 1.5” semi-slick tires. I am about 5’ 8” and usually wear a 30” inseam. I had
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 12, 2009
          Doug,
          I have a 16” Big Dummy frame with its stock rigid fork and 26” x 1.5”
          semi-slick tires. I am about 5’ 8” and usually wear a 30” inseam. I had
          an Xtracycled Univega 750FS for many years before it broke. I still have
          the broken frame, but it is so worn out there is no indication of the
          frame size on the bike. I vaguely recall it being a 17” frame though, and
          when I measured it just now it does seem to be 17 inches. I took that
          measurement from the center of the bottom bracket up along the middle of
          the seat tube/post to the where it would intersect with the top edge of
          the top-tube.
          I should point out my old bike frame had an uncommon build/geometry. You
          can see what I mean if you look at this photo:
          http://www.cranksgiving.net/xs/lunarload-angle.jpg

          WARNING TO ALL: I do NOT recommend trying to haul a load like this. I
          worked as a full time cargo bike messenger in NYC for years and this was a
          personal load I hauled from Home Depot. The route barely had any traffic
          except the parking lot and about 90% of the route was on a straight
          light-traffic street for less than ten short blocks. I have carried other
          similar loads, but this is definitely the biggest, bulkiest, and heaviest.
          I would NEVER do it again. I actually tipped over when the front and back
          ends of the load relieved my tire traction as I biked out of the parking
          lot down the sloped sidewalk into the gutter of the street. I was fine,
          but quite embarrassed since all eyes were on me especially from all the
          cars waiting to drive out of the lot as I had to pick myself up and reload
          the completely shifted lumber. Getting snagged like that could happen to
          anyone with a long enough load and deep enough dip in the road. Keep that
          it mind!

          With that said… My current Big Dummy has pretty much all the same parts
          and accessories swapped over, including the handle bars except I have
          cushioned them with full foam grips slid on. The handle bars I used on
          both bikes are Trekking bars from Nashbar, which I sadly can not locate
          on their web site anymore. L Below is a photo of when I first picked up
          my Big Dummy. When my bike shop received the Big Dummy, which I ordered
          from Xtracycle, I used my wife’s bike to ride to work after leaving my
          old broken frame at the shop. After work I headed back to the bike shop
          where I loaded my wife’s bike, my old broken frame, my old FreeRadical,
          and a couple of panniers onto the new Big Dummy for its maiden voyage to
          its new home.
          http://www.cranksgiving.net/xs/bd-bikehaul1.jpg
          Note: The blue padding on the handlebars is not what I normally use. The
          bar wrap in the photo is actually foam tubing sold as a swimming pool toy
          & floatation device. I slit one lengthwise down the middle and strapped
          two halves on my handlebars using two sided Velcro (fuzzy side out of
          course) to keep it wrapped on. At the time during the part swap to the
          Big Dummy, I had no other bar padding and it was done as super-cushioning
          in anticipation of a single day 114 mile round trip bike ride to/from
          Baltimore.

          I hope this helps you decide on an appropriately sized Big Dummy frame.
          When I bought mine, Xtracycle only had a 16” frame left from their first
          production run, so I got the last Big Dummy they had back then. I was not
          sure of the sizing, but the guys at Xtracycle were pretty sure I would
          feel good about the 16” frame, and they were right. No matter what,
          before that I knew I definitely did not want to get a frame even slightly
          too big for me. That way the load weight would be lower to the ground and
          overall control would be easier for me over the bike. Something else I
          like is having the lower top tube height for mounting and dismounting.
          Not only that, but when I was a messenger riding that phatt-framed
          Univega I got use to giving my butt a rest at so many of the traffic
          lights in NYC. What I would do is keep one foot in the pedal and extend
          the other leg straight out onto the ground like a kickstand, then I would
          rest either thigh across the top-tube. I can still do that with the
          curved top tube of the Big Dummy and its barely smaller frame size for
          me.

          Ride safe,
          _TONE_
        • soappedaler
          I ride a 16 , 5 3 with longer legs and short waisted. Originally had C-bars and the size was perfect but switched to H-bars, for long distance and speed,have
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 12, 2009
            I ride a 16" , 5'3" with longer legs and short waisted. Originally had C-bars and the size was perfect but switched to H-bars, for long distance and speed,have the shortest stem available now. If Surly had made a slightly smaller frame I may have gotten it.
          • David Dannenberg
            Doug, Do you have proportionally long arms? I am 5 10 or just under, but my arm span is greater than 6 2 , and that with small hands. Sound to me that you may
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 12, 2009
              Doug,

              Do you have proportionally long arms? I am 5'10" or just under, but my
              arm span is greater than 6'2", and that with small hands. Sound to me
              that you may be happier on an 18 than a 16 given your long torso and
              height similar to mine. As I posted before, I sometimes wonder if I
              would be as well or better off with a 20 (rather than the 18 that I
              have), and I am running a 4" long stem as on all my bikes.

              More confused now?

              Fact is that you likely won't go wrong either way.

              David
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