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Re: mundo bike

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  • Morgan
    The new Mundos (2009) are nice - lighter weight than last year s, and with a full complement of gears (triple chainring up front). They used shaped tubes to
    Message 1 of 26 , Sep 30, 2009
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      The new Mundos (2009) are nice - lighter weight than last year's, and with a full complement of gears (triple chainring up front).  They used shaped tubes to reduce the weight while supposedly retaining the strength.  They also narrowed the rear cargo platform to better accommodate child seats.

      The old Mundo (last year's) was very solid.  I carried some heavy loads and it is more stable and wobble-free than my Big Dummy when loaded over 70 lbs.  However, the things that led me to prefer my Big Dummy were the weight of the Mundo (2008 version), and the low-end components.  I don't carry heavy loads often enough to have the wobble bother me.  If I were to regularly carry > 100 lbs, I would definitely go Mundo, especially with the new, improved version.

      Morgan
      cycle9.com


      mundo bike

      Posted by: "na na" reesedobbins@...

      Wed Sep 30, 2009 7:53 am (PDT)




      Hey all,

      I've had my X for about a year and a half after I sold my beetle, and have been checking out the Yuba E-mundo. My X has been good so far as a cargo bike, but I have some qualms:

      -Its unwieldy for me at 150lbs, I don't think I could safely ride downhill (and I live on a 30% grade) with more than that - which sucks - because I still have to bum rides from friends for building materials.

      -My calf muscles are really impressive, but I am exhausted and sore on a daily basis

      -The way the x is designed with all the connections theres alot of parts that rust easily, and it rains here pretty regularly.

      -To really replace a car it needs to be able to pull 250lbs of drywall comfortably for me, which it doesnt.

      -My stuff occasionally flies out of the rear end of the bags when I'm going downhill.

      Has anyone had any experience or seen reviews for the mundo ?

      Reese
    • mcgurme
      Bert, Sorry to disagree a bit, but the C lyte x5 series will turn a bike into something that feels and acts more like a motorcycle than a bike. It is quite
      Message 2 of 26 , Oct 1, 2009
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        Bert,
        Sorry to disagree a bit, but the C'lyte x5 series will turn a bike into something that feels and acts more like a motorcycle than a bike. It is quite heavy, and at 80A, this will have over 3 kilowatts of power. There are other solutions to achieving loaded hill climbing that don't involve so much weight or power.
        Morgan



        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Bert Ankrom" <BEAnkrom@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have an emundo. I bought the mundo frame on closeout, so it is last
        > years model (the new frame is 16 pounds lighter). As mentioned the mundo
        > is rock solid there is no flex in the frame at all but I highly
        > recommend buying the frame and adding the components as the stock
        > components leave a bit to be desired. As far as the e-assist there are a
        > ton of options to consider, front wheel hub motor or rear wheel, geared
        > or gearless or an external chain drive (AKA as a stokemonkey). If you
        > indeed do have a 30% grade you will be looking at what is called the
        > Crystalyte x5 series hub motor and a and a beefy minimum 80 amp
        > controller. I won't go into a lot of detail here but you should check
        > out endless sphere an ebike forum
        > (http://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=21) and ask the good
        > folks there for advice. Look around a bit you'll probably even find a
        > few pics of my ride.
        >
        >
        >
        > From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of na na
        > Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 8:53 AM
        > To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [rootsradicals] mundo bike
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hey all,
        >
        > I've had my X for about a year and a half after I sold my beetle, and
        > have been checking out the Yuba E-mundo. My X has been good so far as a
        > cargo bike, but I have some qualms:
        >
        > -Its unwieldy for me at 150lbs, I don't think I could safely ride
        > downhill (and I live on a 30% grade) with more than that - which sucks -
        > because I still have to bum rides from friends for building materials.
        > -My calf muscles are really impressive, but I am exhausted and sore on a
        > daily basis
        > -The way the x is designed with all the connections theres alot of parts
        > that rust easily, and it rains here pretty regularly.
        > -To really replace a car it needs to be able to pull 250lbs of drywall
        > comfortably for me, which it doesnt.
        > -My stuff occasionally flies out of the rear end of the bags when I'm
        > going downhill.
        >
        > Has anyone had any experience or seen reviews for the mundo ?
        >
        > Reese
        >
        > ________________________________
        >
        > Bing(tm) brings you maps, menus, and reviews organized in one place. Try
        > it now.
        > <http://www.bing.com/search?q=restaurants&form=MLOGEN&publ=WLHMTAG&crea=
        > TEXT_MLOGEN_Core_tagline_local_1x1>
        >
      • Kipchoge Spencer
        Hey Morgan, I have another perspective on 100lb+ loads. At least five of our touring bikes always have 100lb+ payloads. Two are Big Dummies. The other 3 are
        Message 3 of 26 , Oct 1, 2009
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          Hey Morgan,

          I have another perspective on 100lb+ loads. At least five of our touring bikes always have 100lb+ payloads. Two are Big Dummies. The other 3 are FreeRadical-equipped MTBs. For touring, I think the combination of high-end components, lower weight, and easier/modular loading system (FreeLoaders) makes the xtracycle system superior to the Mundo. Granted, I haven't ridden a Mundo on tour. To me, where it really shines is as a local-heavy-duty and/or less-expensive cargo machine.

          In my experience, with practice both the BD and the FR handle big loads with aplomb—enough that I don't find myself wishing for a sturdier heavier steed.

          Thanks for your reflections on H-bars. We ride slow so the benefits of total upright cruiser bars seem to outweigh the negatives of wind resistance.

          kipchoge
          --------------
          4 min clip of a Mexican rock odyssey: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZbAIiTZ9bk


          www.gingerninjas.com

          Re: mundo bike

          Posted by: "Morgan" mcgurme@...   mcgurme

          Wed Sep 30, 2009 12:41 pm (PDT)



          The new Mundos (2009) are nice - lighter weight than last year's, and
          with a full complement of gears (triple chainring up front). They
          used shaped tubes to reduce the weight while supposedly retaining the
          strength. They also narrowed the rear cargo platform to better
          accommodate child seats.

          The old Mundo (last year's) was very solid. I carried some heavy
          loads and it is more stable and wobble-free than my Big Dummy when
          loaded over 70 lbs. However, the things that led me to prefer my Big
          Dummy were the weight of the Mundo (2008 version), and the low-end
          components. I don't carry heavy loads often enough to have the wobble
          bother me. If I were to regularly carry > 100 lbs, I would definitely
          go Mundo, especially with the new, improved version.

          Morgan
          cycle9.com
        • mcgurme
          Hi I agree that for touring, the Xtracycle/Big Dummy is a superior solution. If I ever find the time again to do more touring, I will likely use my BD. As
          Message 4 of 26 , Oct 2, 2009
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            Hi
            I agree that for touring, the Xtracycle/Big Dummy is a superior solution. If I ever find the time again to do more touring, I will likely use my BD. As you point out the modularity and lower weight is wonderful. And it's not that the BD can't handle > 100 lb loads - I do carry such loads fairly often, and I can load them up to be stable. It's just that the Mundo is more stable with > 100 lb loads. For me the bottom line is that the Xtracycle platform is more versatile for everyday use, and it is also superior for something like touring. However, if I were to use a bike for heavy-duty utility purposes like carrying drywall and other construction equipment/tools every day (I think that's what the original poster asked about), I'd probably go for the Mundo.
            Regards,
            Morgan


            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Kipchoge Spencer <kipchoge@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hey Morgan,
            >
            > I have another perspective on 100lb+ loads. At least five of our touring
            > bikes always have 100lb+ payloads. Two are Big Dummies. The other 3 are
            > FreeRadical-equipped MTBs. For touring, I think the combination of high-end
            > components, lower weight, and easier/modular loading system (FreeLoaders)
            > makes the xtracycle system superior to the Mundo. Granted, I haven't ridden
            > a Mundo on tour. To me, where it really shines is as a local-heavy-duty
            > and/or less-expensive cargo machine.
            >
            > In my experience, with practice both the BD and the FR handle big loads with
            > aplomb—enough that I don't find myself wishing for a sturdier heavier steed.
            >
            > Thanks for your reflections on H-bars. We ride slow so the benefits of total
            > upright cruiser bars seem to outweigh the negatives of wind resistance.
            >
            > kipchoge
            > --------------
            > 4 min clip of a Mexican rock odyssey:
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZbAIiTZ9bk
            >
            >
            > www.gingerninjas.com
            >
          • jj
            We do a lot of family biking (not car free, but we use abou a gas tank a month.), and my oldest daughter (12) is asking for a different saddle. She has become
            Message 5 of 26 , Oct 2, 2009
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              We do a lot of family biking (not car free, but we use abou a gas tank a
              month.), and my oldest daughter (12) is asking for a different saddle.
              She has become conscious of the "squished parts" feeling from foam
              seats, and has asked for something with some cushioning, but not foam.

              Since we do a lot of biking, I am not opposed to getting her a Brooks
              and having her switch it from the Tandem she rides with her sister to
              her own Townie, but I wanted to see if anyone had any suggestions that
              were better.

              Also: Will a Brooks saddle "adjust" to her over time as she grows (she
              isn't done growing) or is it a bad idea to expect it to last her for
              more than a season or two?

              Thanks!

              JJ
            • Liz W. Durham
              Don t know about Brooks adjusting over time. I have WTB women s specific saddles on bikes and love them. From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 26 , Oct 2, 2009
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                Don’t know about Brooks adjusting over time.

                I have WTB women’s specific saddles on bikes and love them.

                 

                From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jj
                Sent: Friday, October 02, 2009 12:17 PM
                To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [rootsradicals] Saddle advice for a teenager

                 

                 

                We do a lot of family biking (not car free, but we use abou a gas tank a
                month.), and my oldest daughter (12) is asking for a different saddle.
                She has become conscious of the "squished parts" feeling from foam
                seats, and has asked for something with some cushioning, but not foam.

                Since we do a lot of biking, I am not opposed to getting her a Brooks
                and having her switch it from the Tandem she rides with her sister to
                her own Townie, but I wanted to see if anyone had any suggestions that
                were better.

                Also: Will a Brooks saddle "adjust" to her over time as she grows (she
                isn't done growing) or is it a bad idea to expect it to last her for
                more than a season or two?

                Thanks!

                JJ

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              • Sturge
                FWIW, I have a Brooks B17 (one of the unsprung ones) on my commuter. I d heard great things about them, but after about a year and around 1500 miles (yeah, I
                Message 7 of 26 , Oct 5, 2009
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                  FWIW, I have a Brooks B17 (one of the unsprung ones) on my commuter. I'd
                  heard great things about them, but after about a year and around 1500
                  miles (yeah, I know, easy commute, right?) it's still not achieved the
                  comfort level I expected. Don't get me wrong, it's not *bad*, but I
                  don't think I'd want to go touring on it. I've treated it right, not got
                  it wet, Proofided (is that a verb?) it regularly, but it's still a
                  rock-hard beast, and largely the same shape it was when I got it! (And
                  I'm not a tiny individual). I intend to keep 'working on it', but these
                  things aren't a quick fix for comfort. As with all things, of course, YMMV.
                  Slightly tangentially, I might be reading more into your post than is
                  there, but in my experience, when a young 'un says something like
                  "something with some cushioning, but not foam", they've likely got their
                  eye on some highly expensive and flashy new bit of gel-based kit, rather
                  than a leather rock ;o)
                  Cheers
                  Ian


                  jj wrote:
                  > We do a lot of family biking (not car free, but we use abou a gas tank a
                  > month.), and my oldest daughter (12) is asking for a different saddle.
                  > She has become conscious of the "squished parts" feeling from foam
                  > seats, and has asked for something with some cushioning, but not foam.
                  >
                  > Since we do a lot of biking, I am not opposed to getting her a Brooks
                  > and having her switch it from the Tandem she rides with her sister to
                  > her own Townie, but I wanted to see if anyone had any suggestions that
                  > were better.
                  >
                  > Also: Will a Brooks saddle "adjust" to her over time as she grows (she
                  > isn't done growing) or is it a bad idea to expect it to last her for
                  > more than a season or two?
                  >
                  > Thanks!
                  >
                  > JJ
                  >
                  >
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