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Re: [rootsradicals] Re: Front wheel and generator hub recommendations

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  • Steve Lange
    ... I have had good luck with Shimano dynamo hubs. I have the DH-3D71 on my Xtracycle and the DH-3N80 on my Surly Cross Check. I can t perceive a difference in
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 24, 2009
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      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Devin Quince <coultraguy@...> wrote:

      > Any ideas, recommendations, etc. would be awesome. Stability, strength, and
      > longevity are more important than weight.

      I have had good luck with Shimano dynamo hubs. I have the DH-3D71 on my Xtracycle and the DH-3N80 on my Surly Cross Check. I can't perceive a difference in drag when the light is on (I use Busch & Mueller headlights on both), but I'm sure there's some small amount. It's unnoticeable enough that I think it is irrelevant on an Xtracycle application.

      The Xtracycle has the DH-3D71 laced to a Sun Rhyno Lite rim (26"), and on the Cross Check I have the DH-3N80 laced to a Sun CR18 (700c). I got the 700c wheel from Velo Orange, whose price I found quite reasonable, though I did need to have the wheel properly trued & tensioned by the LBS. 

      That worked out OK, but in retrospect I'd have rather ordered from Harris Cyclery because then it would've come perfect out of box (the Xtracycle wheel was built by them and has been perfect since day one).  Would've cost an extra $30-40 over the VO price, but then again I wouldn't have had the cost of truing and tensioning it. Your mileage may vary depending on luck, wheel truing skill, etc...

      Steve
    • Cara Lin Bridgman
      Hi Morgan, How do you run power from battery to lights? This seems like an excellent way to cut down on AAA battery use. What sorts of lights do you use? CL
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 24, 2009
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        Hi Morgan,

        How do you run power from battery to lights? This seems like an
        excellent way to cut down on AAA battery use. What sorts of lights do
        you use?

        CL

        mcgurme wrote:
        > One less expensive alternative to the hub generator is the "Reelight": http://www.reelight.com/
        >
        > It seems like a good product; our customers have been happy with it. I haven't tried it myself, since I use the power from my electric assist battery to run my lights. But if I were commuting on a non-electrified bike, this is the first solution I'd use due to the simplicity and low cost.
        >
        > Morgan

        --

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        Cara Lin Bridgman cara.lin@...

        P.O. Box 013 Shinjhuang http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin
        Longjing Township http://www.BugDorm.com
        Taichung County 43499
        Taiwan Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      • David Dannenberg
        I have the Schmidt and love it. David Dannenberg
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 24, 2009
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          I have the Schmidt and love it.

          David Dannenberg
        • Carl Ray
          Dude, I would check out Harris Cyclery (Sheldon Brown) http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/lighting/schmidt.html
          Message 4 of 19 , Aug 24, 2009
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            Dude,

            I would check out Harris Cyclery (Sheldon Brown) 

            and of course...

            This is a wealth of information I have yet to digest it myself but If/when I go with hub generator lights this is where I would go.
            My friend just got a nice system, I am really impressed with how it lights up his way.

            Carl

            On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 6:18 AM, Devin Quince <coultraguy@...> wrote:
             

            I am running an Xtracycle on a Novarra Randonnee that needs a new front wheel (700x35-43) in the next 2-3 months. Also since I just scored a new gig after 5 months of no work that sees me commuting around 10 at night I also wanted to look to at a generator for lighting purposes.

            Any ideas, recommendations, etc. would be awesome. Stability, strength, and longevity are more important than weight.
            Thanks and ride safe,
            Devin




            --
            “A plant, which is a living and breathing entity, has the ability to understand and work in synchrony with the body’s internal needs, in harmony with the vital force within us, to heal and give life”

            -Donald R. Yance
          • mcgurme
            Hi Cara, Sorry for the slow response, it s been a busy week. The basic idea is to implement a DC/DC converter, which converts the voltage from your battery
            Message 5 of 19 , Aug 27, 2009
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              Hi Cara,
              Sorry for the slow response, it's been a busy week.

              The basic idea is to implement a "DC/DC" converter, which converts the
              voltage from your battery down to a voltage that can be used to power
              lights. Most bike lights operate at 3, 6, 9, or 12V DC, whereas the e-bike
              battery (in your case) is ~38V. There are various sources of these, and
              I've experimented a bunch with them, though many are not sufficiently
              weatherproof for the bike. But I do have a large DC/DC converter I bought
              on close out, and I can use my bike battery to power my lights, computer or thermoelectric cooler (the latter which both accept input at 12V and use
              about 60 watts). I just put a cigarette-lighter plug (like in a car) on the
              output end of the converter, so I can plug in anything that plugs into a
              standard 12v lighter outlet.

              The bike battery is 360 watt hours, enough to power a 60 watt device for about
              6 hours. It's pretty nifty to have a portable power source right on my bike!

              I can help people with solutions like this if anyone is interested.

              As for just the lighting, I found a source that is making compact lights that
              incorporate the DC/DC converter directly inside, so that you can plug
              these lights into any battery from 12V to 96V and "they just work". I use
              these as both my front and tail lighting on my Big Dummy.

              http://www.cycle9.com/c9store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=8_9&products_id=180

              http://www.cycle9.com/c9store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=8_9&products_id=181

              Stay bright!
              Morgan


              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman <shokulan@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Morgan,
              >
              > How do you run power from battery to lights? This seems like an
              > excellent way to cut down on AAA battery use. What sorts of lights do
              > you use?
              >
              > CL
              >
              > mcgurme wrote:
              > > One less expensive alternative to the hub generator is the "Reelight": http://www.reelight.com/
              > >
              > > It seems like a good product; our customers have been happy with it. I haven't tried it myself, since I use the power from my electric assist battery to run my lights. But if I were commuting on a non-electrified bike, this is the first solution I'd use due to the simplicity and low cost.
              > >
              > > Morgan
              >
              > --
              >
              > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              > Cara Lin Bridgman cara.lin@...
              >
              > P.O. Box 013 Shinjhuang http://megaview.com.tw/~caralin
              > Longjing Township http://www.BugDorm.com
              > Taichung County 43499
              > Taiwan Phone: 886-4-2632-5484
              > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              >
            • rphaedrus@gmail.com
              For Minnesota winter riding, you pretty much have to go with the Schmidt if you want to see more than a season or two of riding. I ve heard of a Shimano
              Message 6 of 19 , Aug 27, 2009
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                For Minnesota winter riding, you pretty much have to go with the
                Schmidt if you want to see more than a season or two of riding. I've
                heard of a Shimano lasting through more than one winter of regular
                riding, but it seems pretty hit and miss.

                For wheels, I chose Velocity Cliffhangers. If I wanted less weight, I
                would have gone with the Aeroheat AT. If it had been out at the time
                I was building my bike up, I would have seriously considered the
                Velocity Chukkers as they seem pretty great.

                A lot of people like the Sun Rhynolite, but I've had a bad experience
                trying to remove a set of Nokian Mount and Grounds from them - after
                breaking two spoke wrenches and bashing my hands up, I ended up
                cutting out the hub and having it rebuilt with an Aeroheat. The
                Velocities seem to be slightly smaller or something because I can
                pretty much change tires on them without tools.

                For tires, I like the Nokian Mount & Grounds in the winter, Schwalbe
                Big Apples in the summer. If my commute were different and I needed
                more tread than the Big Apples, I'd probably go one of the variants of
                Schwalbe Marathons.

                - phaedrus

                On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 8:18 AM, Devin Quince<coultraguy@...> wrote:
                > I am running an Xtracycle on a Novarra Randonnee that needs a new front
                > wheel (700x35-43) in the next 2-3 months. Also since I just scored a new gig
                > after 5 months of no work that sees me commuting around 10 at night I also
                > wanted to look to at a generator for lighting purposes.
                >
                > Any ideas, recommendations, etc. would be awesome. Stability, strength, and
                > longevity are more important than weight.
                > Thanks and ride safe,
                > Devin
              • rphaedrus@gmail.com
                Oh yeah, I m assuming you ll be wanting generator lights as well. I m happy with my setup, but if had been out at the time, I would have gone with the
                Message 7 of 19 , Aug 27, 2009
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                  Oh yeah, I'm assuming you'll be wanting generator lights as well.

                  I'm happy with my setup, but if had been out at the time, I would have
                  gone with the Supernova lights. My dream set up would be an E3
                  asymmetrical and a switched E3 symmetrical. The E3 triple is pretty
                  incredibly bright as well.

                  I'm currently running a Lumotec IQ FLy N Plus headlight with a B&M 4D
                  Lite Plus for the taillight, and they seem plenty good. Because I'm
                  somewhat paranoid, I usually throw on a couple of Planet Bike
                  Superflashes or Princeton Tec Swerves if I know I'm going to be out
                  after dark.

                  - phaedrus

                  On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 11:51 AM,
                  rphaedrus@...<rphaedrus@...> wrote:
                  > For Minnesota winter riding, you pretty much have to go with the
                  > Schmidt if you want to see more than a season or two of riding.  I've
                  > heard of a Shimano lasting through more than one winter of regular
                  > riding, but it seems pretty hit and miss.
                  >
                  > For wheels, I chose Velocity Cliffhangers.  If I wanted less weight, I
                  > would have gone with the Aeroheat AT.  If it had been out at the time
                  > I was building my bike up, I would have seriously considered the
                  > Velocity Chukkers as they seem pretty great.
                  >
                  > A lot of people like the Sun Rhynolite, but I've had a bad experience
                  > trying to remove a set of Nokian Mount and Grounds from them -  after
                  > breaking two spoke wrenches and bashing my hands up, I ended up
                  > cutting out the hub and having it rebuilt with an Aeroheat.  The
                  > Velocities seem to be slightly smaller or something because I can
                  > pretty much change tires on them without tools.
                  >
                  > For tires, I like the Nokian Mount & Grounds in the winter, Schwalbe
                  > Big Apples in the summer.  If my commute were different and I needed
                  > more tread than the Big Apples, I'd probably go one of the variants of
                  > Schwalbe Marathons.
                  >
                  > - phaedrus
                  >
                  > On Mon, Aug 24, 2009 at 8:18 AM, Devin Quince<coultraguy@...> wrote:
                  >> I am running an Xtracycle on a Novarra Randonnee that needs a new front
                  >> wheel (700x35-43) in the next 2-3 months. Also since I just scored a new gig
                  >> after 5 months of no work that sees me commuting around 10 at night I also
                  >> wanted to look to at a generator for lighting purposes.
                  >>
                  >> Any ideas, recommendations, etc. would be awesome. Stability, strength, and
                  >> longevity are more important than weight.
                  >> Thanks and ride safe,
                  >> Devin
                  >
                • David Chase
                  ... How do the Shimano hubs fail? I ask, because that s what I ve got, and they were plenty expensive. David
                  Message 8 of 19 , Aug 27, 2009
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                    On 2009-08-27, at 12:51 PM, rphaedrus@... wrote:

                    > For Minnesota winter riding, you pretty much have to go with the
                    > Schmidt if you want to see more than a season or two of riding. I've
                    > heard of a Shimano lasting through more than one winter of regular
                    > riding, but it seems pretty hit and miss.
                    >
                    How do the Shimano hubs fail?
                    I ask, because that's what I've got, and they were plenty expensive.

                    David
                  • rphaedrus@gmail.com
                    From what I ve been told, they keep spinning fine, but they stop putting out juice (as opposed to the Sturmley Archers which also seem to gain a lot of
                    Message 9 of 19 , Aug 27, 2009
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                      From what I've been told, they keep spinning fine, but they stop
                      putting out juice (as opposed to the Sturmley Archers which also seem
                      to gain a lot of friction). My guess is that their seals aren't as
                      capable of dealing with harsh conditions, but that's just a guess.

                      I'm not sure which is worse on equipment - the really cold temps or
                      the freeze-thaw-freeze-thaw+lots of salt. My guess is, other than
                      where grease is involved, the latter.

                      - phaedrus

                      On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 12:02 PM, David Chase<dr2chase@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > On 2009-08-27, at 12:51 PM, rphaedrus@... wrote:
                      >
                      >> For Minnesota winter riding, you pretty much have to go with the
                      >> Schmidt if you want to see more than a season or two of riding. I've
                      >> heard of a Shimano lasting through more than one winter of regular
                      >> riding, but it seems pretty hit and miss.
                      >>
                      > How do the Shimano hubs fail?
                      > I ask, because that's what I've got, and they were plenty expensive.
                      >
                      > David
                      >
                      >
                    • sh8knj8kster
                      ~~~~I thought about this thread late Friday afternoon when I left for a leisure ride on one of my bicycles (not my free radical equipped Surly Trucker) I got
                      Message 10 of 19 , Aug 28, 2009
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                        ~~~~I thought about this thread late Friday afternoon when I left for a leisure ride on one of my bicycles (not my free radical equipped Surly Trucker) I got to the gate down at the road and when I went to turn on my battery powered front blinky light, no juice=:-(


                        Our house is 1500' off the road...i didn't feel like pedalling back for fresh batteries so I used my phone (with a good battery=:-) to ask wifey to bring me some fresh batts=:-) She did and this was a high point of our marriage yesterday=:-)


                        Okay, she came out to the road in her truck and you may be wondering why I just didn't pedal back to the house, not that this is the point of this post but our drive is lime rock for a 1000', grass for the rest of the way, a couple of hills, the rock has plenty of algae from the recent rains and cloudy weather, I was on one of my bents, feeling lazy, you get the picture. Hey!, I did a 16 mile ride after she brought me the batteries (8 out, the same 8 miles back)


                        Now to the point of this reply...I like the concept of generator hubs but for me (and i'll bet a lot of other bicyclits), since I own and ride more than one bicycle, it isn't cheap to outfit each and every bike with a generator hub. then too I'm not on my bikes day in and day out like those that have a burning need to fit their steed with a generator hub. I'll admit it, I'm a fun and fitness bicycle rider. The Xtracycle hacked onto my trucker gets use and most certainly more on my farm than actual road use, although I ride the trucker out on public roads often...just that I utilize the hauling portion of the free rad more so on my property


                        Anyways, I like the idea of the Reel Lights that Morgan peddles for thier cost savings and could see a set or two making their way onto my bikes before a generator hub would...just sayin





                        Jake
                        Reddick Fla.
                        The use of the "f" word is almost always gratuitously vulgar and coarse,
                        but when used by the mayor of Hiroshima when he said, "What the f*** was
                        that", it appears to be entirely appropriate!!






                        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "rphaedrus@..." <rphaedrus@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > From what I've been told, they keep spinning fine, but they stop
                        > putting out juice (as opposed to the Sturmley Archers which also seem
                        > to gain a lot of friction). My guess is that their seals aren't as
                        > capable of dealing with harsh conditions, but that's just a guess.
                        >
                        > I'm not sure which is worse on equipment - the really cold temps or
                        > the freeze-thaw-freeze-thaw+lots of salt. My guess is, other than
                        > where grease is involved, the latter.
                        >
                        > - phaedrus
                        >
                        > On Thu, Aug 27, 2009 at 12:02 PM, David Chase<dr2chase@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > On 2009-08-27, at 12:51 PM, rphaedrus@... wrote:
                        > >
                        > >> For Minnesota winter riding, you pretty much have to go with the
                        > >> Schmidt if you want to see more than a season or two of riding. I've
                        > >> heard of a Shimano lasting through more than one winter of regular
                        > >> riding, but it seems pretty hit and miss.
                        > >>
                        > > How do the Shimano hubs fail?
                        > > I ask, because that's what I've got, and they were plenty expensive.
                        > >
                        > > David
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • David Chase
                        ... Sidewall generators get the job done, usually. They only failed me when it got so cold, and the rubber on the snow tires was so hard, that they did not
                        Message 11 of 19 , Aug 29, 2009
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                          On 2009-08-29, at 2:06 AM, sh8knj8kster wrote:
                          > Now to the point of this reply...I like the concept of generator
                          > hubs but for me (and i'll bet a lot of other bicyclits), since I own
                          > and ride more than one bicycle, it isn't cheap to outfit each and
                          > every bike with a generator hub. then too I'm not on my bikes day in
                          > and day out like those that have a burning need to fit their steed
                          > with a generator hub.
                          >

                          Sidewall generators get the job done, usually. They only failed me
                          when it got so cold, and the rubber on the snow tires was so hard,
                          that they did not grip. The hub generators DO crank out more power.

                          Velo-orange used to sell Spanninga generators that are ok, but I don't
                          see any now. I ordered a few from the manufacturer in Europe; the
                          price ($8.31, but I bought 4) was low, the shipping ($22) was not:

                          Détails de la commande:
                          Référence Nom Prix U HT Quantité Prix T HT Prix T TTC TVA
                          019509 VESTA 8.78 4 35.12 42.00 6.88
                          Total produits 35.12 42.00 6.88
                          Transport 22.00 26.31 4.31
                          Total payé 57.12 68.31 11.19

                          I also tried a very expensive sidewall generator from B&M (bought from
                          Peter White), but it crapped out, and I do not recommend those
                          generators at all. If a $17 generator craps out, not so bad.

                          However, that still leaves duplicate lights on all your bikes. That's
                          another $30 per bike, roughly, but the results are quite nice (100
                          lumens, front, plus a taillight, easy).

                          David
                        • sh8knj8kster
                          ... ~~~Anything below 60 degrees f is an event so I don t ride. Sorry, I m a wuss. It wasn t always this way=:-) thanks for the sidewall dynamo
                          Message 12 of 19 , Aug 29, 2009
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                            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:





                            > Sidewall generators get the job done, usually. They only failed me
                            > when it got so cold, and the rubber on the snow tires was so hard,
                            > that they did not grip.




                            ~~~Anything below 60 degrees f is an event so I don't ride. Sorry, I'm a wuss. It wasn't always this way=:-) thanks for the sidewall dynamo suggestion...I'll mull it around




                            Jake
                            Reddick Fla.
                            "The mother of stupidity is always pregnant." - old Sicilian Saying







                            >
                            >
                            > On 2009-08-29, at 2:06 AM, sh8knj8kster wrote:
                            > > Now to the point of this reply...I like the concept of generator
                            > > hubs but for me (and i'll bet a lot of other bicyclits), since I own
                            > > and ride more than one bicycle, it isn't cheap to outfit each and
                            > > every bike with a generator hub. then too I'm not on my bikes day in
                            > > and day out like those that have a burning need to fit their steed
                            > > with a generator hub.
                            > >
                            >
                            > Sidewall generators get the job done, usually. They only failed me
                            > when it got so cold, and the rubber on the snow tires was so hard,
                            > that they did not grip. The hub generators DO crank out more power.
                            >
                            > Velo-orange used to sell Spanninga generators that are ok, but I don't
                            > see any now. I ordered a few from the manufacturer in Europe; the
                            > price ($8.31, but I bought 4) was low, the shipping ($22) was not:
                            >
                            > Détails de la commande:
                            > Référence Nom Prix U HT Quantité Prix T HT Prix T TTC TVA
                            > 019509 VESTA 8.78 4 35.12 42.00 6.88
                            > Total produits 35.12 42.00 6.88
                            > Transport 22.00 26.31 4.31
                            > Total payé 57.12 68.31 11.19
                            >
                            > I also tried a very expensive sidewall generator from B&M (bought from
                            > Peter White), but it crapped out, and I do not recommend those
                            > generators at all. If a $17 generator craps out, not so bad.
                            >
                            > However, that still leaves duplicate lights on all your bikes. That's
                            > another $30 per bike, roughly, but the results are quite nice (100
                            > lumens, front, plus a taillight, easy).
                            >
                            > David
                            >
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