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Re: [rootsradicals] boxing an X for transport

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  • Sean Moore
    Search this list for a user named Devian (real name). He s got a blog and IIRC he took his dummy on Amtrak with no box, just loaded it carefully himself...
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 8, 2009
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      Search this list for a user named "Devian" (real name). He's got a
      blog and IIRC he took his dummy on Amtrak with no box, just loaded it
      carefully himself... that could have been a bus, I don't really
      remember.
      --
      Sean Moore
      moore.sean@...



      On Sun, Aug 9, 2009 at 12:00 AM, jj<jj@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > I have to go to Eugene for my HS reunion at the end of the month. I am
      > thinkin' amtrak, and bringing the X instead of driving down.
      >
      > Anyone boxed up an X for transport on amtrak? Does it take two boxes?
      >
      > thanks!
      >
      > JJ
      >
      >
    • Jens
      I ve travelled by Amtrak from VA to GA. I was not allowed to leave the bike unboxed as D was. Two boxes and a good amount of tape are needed. You also need
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 9, 2009
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        I've travelled by Amtrak from VA to GA. I was not allowed to leave the bike unboxed as D was.

        Two boxes and a good amount of tape are needed. You also need to be aware of weight - it's easy to go over the limit.

        Not as easy as just throwing it on the baggage car but it's not bad at all!





        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, jj <jj@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have to go to Eugene for my HS reunion at the end of the month. I am
        > thinkin' amtrak, and bringing the X instead of driving down.
        >
        > Anyone boxed up an X for transport on amtrak? Does it take two boxes?
        >
        > thanks!
        >
        > JJ
        >
      • fblack947
        ... 50% successful. I was able to get one of the legs out. The second leg has been treated with PB Blaster and subjected to some pretty harsh treatment with
        Message 3 of 20 , Aug 11, 2009
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          <rick@...> wrote:
          >
          > I would take a cleaning rag and some vice grips to the legs. Wrap the legs
          > a couple times with the rag and then dial in the vice grips to clamp enough
          > to get a firm hold of the leg and then twist back and forth.
          >

          50% successful. I was able to get one of the legs out.

          The second leg has been treated with PB Blaster and subjected to some
          pretty harsh treatment with some vice grips, but to no avail.

          Any other hints?

          -Jonathan
        • Fred K. Aron
          If it is corosion or grit keeping it stuck, try vibration.  Lightly tapping with a hammer or using the vibration from a random orbital sander to vibrate
          Message 4 of 20 , Aug 11, 2009
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            If it is corosion or grit keeping it stuck, try vibration.  Lightly tapping with a hammer or using the vibration from a random orbital sander to vibrate it loose.
             
            Here to keep the wolves at bay.
            Sheepdog



            From: fblack947 <fblack947@...>
            To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, August 11, 2009 10:58:51 AM
            Subject: [rootsradicals] Re: Stuck Kickback Legs

             

            <rick@...> wrote:

            >
            > I would take a cleaning rag and some vice grips to the legs. Wrap the legs
            > a couple times with the rag and then dial in the vice grips to clamp enough
            > to get a firm hold of the leg and then twist back and forth.
            >

            50% successful. I was able to get one of the legs out.

            The second leg has been treated with PB Blaster and subjected to some
            pretty harsh treatment with some vice grips, but to no avail.

            Any other hints?

            -Jonathan


          • Sean Moore
            Heat! Torches can get out of hand and will ruin any finish on it, if you or someone you know has a heat gun it may be enough. -- Sean Moore
            Message 5 of 20 , Aug 11, 2009
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              Heat!

              Torches can get out of hand and will ruin any finish on it, if you or
              someone you know has a heat gun it may be enough.


              --
              Sean Moore
              moore.sean@...



              On Tue, Aug 11, 2009 at 8:58 AM, fblack947<fblack947@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > <rick@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> I would take a cleaning rag and some vice grips to the legs. Wrap the legs
              >> a couple times with the rag and then dial in the vice grips to clamp
              >> enough
              >> to get a firm hold of the leg and then twist back and forth.
              >>
              >
              > 50% successful. I was able to get one of the legs out.
              >
              > The second leg has been treated with PB Blaster and subjected to some
              > pretty harsh treatment with some vice grips, but to no avail.
              >
              > Any other hints?
              >
              > -Jonathan
              >
              >
            • jj
              Hair Dryers work well for wider things that need heat applied. JJ
              Message 6 of 20 , Aug 11, 2009
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                Hair Dryers work well for wider things that need heat applied.

                JJ


                Sean Moore wrote:
                >
                >
                > Heat!
                >
                > Torches can get out of hand and will ruin any finish on it, if you or
                > someone you know has a heat gun it may be enough.
                >
                > --
                > Sean Moore
                > moore.sean@... <mailto:moore.sean%40gmail.com>
                >
                > On Tue, Aug 11, 2009 at 8:58 AM, fblack947<fblack947@...
                > <mailto:fblack947%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > <rick@...> wrote:
                > >>
                > >> I would take a cleaning rag and some vice grips to the legs. Wrap
                > the legs
                > >> a couple times with the rag and then dial in the vice grips to clamp
                > >> enough
                > >> to get a firm hold of the leg and then twist back and forth.
                > >>
                > >
                > > 50% successful. I was able to get one of the legs out.
                > >
                > > The second leg has been treated with PB Blaster and subjected to some
                > > pretty harsh treatment with some vice grips, but to no avail.
                > >
                > > Any other hints?
                > >
                > > -Jonathan
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
              • fblack947
                ... Upon closer inspection, it looks like the KickBack legs are aluminum, while the body is steel. Galvanic corrosion at its finest. Heating the aluminum would
                Message 7 of 20 , Aug 11, 2009
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                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, jj <jj@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hair Dryers work well for wider things that need heat applied.
                  >
                  > JJ
                  >

                  Upon closer inspection, it looks like the KickBack legs are aluminum, while the body is steel.

                  Galvanic corrosion at its finest.

                  Heating the aluminum would likely cause it to expand more into the steel. Cooling on the other hand...

                  For now, I'm following the late Sheldon's advice and the KickBack is soaking in ammonia and waiting for the magic to occur:
                  http://www.sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html
                  (Tip XIII)

                  -Jonathan
                • Sean Moore
                  Aluminum tube, huh? What a silly thing to make a kickstand out of. GL with the ammonia, it will probably work. -- Sean Moore moore.sean@gmail.com
                  Message 8 of 20 , Aug 12, 2009
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                    Aluminum tube, huh? What a silly thing to make a kickstand out of.

                    GL with the ammonia, it will probably work.

                    --
                    Sean Moore
                    moore.sean@...



                    On Tue, Aug 11, 2009 at 2:44 PM, fblack947<fblack947@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, jj <jj@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> Hair Dryers work well for wider things that need heat applied.
                    >>
                    >> JJ
                    >>
                    >
                    > Upon closer inspection, it looks like the KickBack legs are aluminum, while
                    > the body is steel.
                    >
                    > Galvanic corrosion at its finest.
                    >
                    > Heating the aluminum would likely cause it to expand more into the steel.
                    > Cooling on the other hand...
                    >
                    > For now, I'm following the late Sheldon's advice and the KickBack is soaking
                    > in ammonia and waiting for the magic to occur:
                    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html
                    > (Tip XIII)
                    >
                    > -Jonathan
                    >
                    >
                  • Rick Pickett
                    Most kickstands are aluminum, not too silly. on the move
                    Message 9 of 20 , Aug 12, 2009
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                      Most kickstands are aluminum, not too silly.

                      on the move

                      On Aug 12, 2009, at 12:57 AM, Sean Moore <moore.sean@...> wrote:

                       

                      Aluminum tube, huh? What a silly thing to make a kickstand out of.

                      GL with the ammonia, it will probably work.

                      --
                      Sean Moore
                      moore.sean@gmail. com

                      On Tue, Aug 11, 2009 at 2:44 PM, fblack947<fblack947@yahoo. com> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, jj <jj@...> wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Hair Dryers work well for wider things that need heat applied.
                      >>
                      >> JJ
                      >>
                      >
                      > Upon closer inspection, it looks like the KickBack legs are aluminum, while
                      > the body is steel.
                      >
                      > Galvanic corrosion at its finest.
                      >
                      > Heating the aluminum would likely cause it to expand more into the steel.
                      > Cooling on the other hand...
                      >
                      > For now, I'm following the late Sheldon's advice and the KickBack is soaking
                      > in ammonia and waiting for the magic to occur:
                      > http://www.sheldonb rown.com/ stuck-seatposts. html
                      > (Tip XIII)
                      >
                      > -Jonathan
                      >
                      >

                    • fblack947
                      ... Not silly at all. The aluminum tube is almost totally in compression under load, and the tubes should be plenty strong enough to avoid buckling. The
                      Message 10 of 20 , Aug 12, 2009
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                        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Rick Pickett <rick@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Most kickstands are aluminum, not too silly.
                        >
                        > on the move
                        >

                        Not silly at all. The aluminum tube is almost totally in compression under load, and the tubes should be plenty strong enough to avoid buckling. The KickBack is bulky enough already! Take a little weight savings where you can!

                        Unfortunately, the aluminum will want to negatively interact with the steel, as I've found out. Might want to mention that in the manual. Treat it BETTER than one would treat an aluminum seatpost, as the KickBack is in a much dirtier position (even with my fenders).

                        It may be time to look into the warranty. At a minimum, I'll need a new leg.

                        An overnight soaking in ammonia has not yet been enough to release the leg, but it does look like it's getting into the joint with the steel body. I'll give it another day or two.

                        -Jonathan
                      • Neil Walsh
                        ... Talking about weight savings on a cargo bike is silly though. I have a KickBack now. It was an expensive (but necessary) piece of kit for me. However, the
                        Message 11 of 20 , Aug 12, 2009
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                          On Wed, Aug 12, 2009 at 4:23 PM, fblack947<fblack947@...> wrote:
                          > Not silly at all. The aluminum tube is almost totally in compression under
                          > load, and the tubes should be plenty strong enough to avoid buckling. The
                          > KickBack is bulky enough already! Take a little weight savings where you
                          > can!

                          Talking about weight savings on a cargo bike is silly though. I have a
                          KickBack now. It was an expensive (but necessary) piece of kit for me.
                          However, the issues I have had so far (stuck legs, crap taco) means it
                          is (imo) really poor value for money. For anyone looking for a stand
                          for their X, I would now recommend the Rolling Jackass over the
                          KickBack.

                          Question for Rick : are you supplying the steel plates for the BD boom
                          tube to people who didn't buy it through Xtracycle?

                          Neil
                        • fblack947
                          ... No, it s not. It might not be of primary concern, but it s still a concern. If a design can be lighter and still strong enough, lighter is most
                          Message 12 of 20 , Aug 12, 2009
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                            > Talking about weight savings on a cargo bike is silly though.

                            No, it's not. It might not be of primary concern, but it's still a concern. If a design can be lighter and still strong enough, lighter is most definitely better.

                            After all, the point of a cargo bike is to be ridden around and used. If a bike gets too heavy, it's much less likely to be used, defeating the whole purpose.

                            My KickBack has worked pretty well until I had to adjust the leg length, and I'm working through that issue. Xtracycle's design could be a little improved in that arena. (Greasing the legs and reminding the user to check them every so often in the manual would have prevented my issue. Providing plugs to seal the holes on either side of the taco bushing would have helped even more).

                            Of course, it would be nice if things were cheaper, but: a) it's way less than $350; b) it looks like they keep selling out...

                            -Jonathan
                          • Rick | Xtracycle, Inc
                            It s definitely in refinement stage. I ll add the grease mention in our next instructions revision. We don t have a machined/injection-molded plug for the top
                            Message 13 of 20 , Aug 12, 2009
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                              It's definitely in refinement stage. I'll add the grease mention in our next instructions revision. We don't have a machined/injection-molded plug for the top holes, but hopefully our new injection molded taco plates will at least cover them a fair amount.

                              Here's to the ammonia working today (or tomorrow).

                              Rick

                              On Wed, Aug 12, 2009 at 9:05 AM, fblack947 <fblack947@...> wrote:
                               


                              > Talking about weight savings on a cargo bike is silly though.

                              No, it's not. It might not be of primary concern, but it's still a concern. If a design can be lighter and still strong enough, lighter is most definitely better.

                              After all, the point of a cargo bike is to be ridden around and used. If a bike gets too heavy, it's much less likely to be used, defeating the whole purpose.

                              My KickBack has worked pretty well until I had to adjust the leg length, and I'm working through that issue. Xtracycle's design could be a little improved in that arena. (Greasing the legs and reminding the user to check them every so often in the manual would have prevented my issue. Providing plugs to seal the holes on either side of the taco bushing would have helped even more).

                              Of course, it would be nice if things were cheaper, but: a) it's way less than $350; b) it looks like they keep selling out...

                              -Jonathan




                              --
                              graphic structuralist | rick@...
                              888 537 1401 x709 | the original longtail company
                            • Andrew Kreps
                              ... Hey, JJ -- I haven t taken an X on the train, but I used to take my regular bicycle on the Portland to Eugene route fairly often. It s completely
                              Message 14 of 20 , Aug 12, 2009
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                                On Sat, Aug 8, 2009 at 11:00 PM, jj<jj@...> wrote:
                                > I have to go to Eugene for my HS reunion at the end of the month. I am
                                > thinkin' amtrak, and bringing the X instead of driving down.
                                >
                                > Anyone boxed up an X for transport on amtrak? Does it take two boxes?
                                >

                                Hey, JJ -- I haven't taken an X on the train, but I used to take my
                                'regular' bicycle on the Portland to Eugene route fairly often. It's
                                completely painless. You head to the baggage claim to get a tag, and
                                then you hand it to the baggage car on the tracks. When you hop off,
                                you grab it the same way, and ride right away, no box necessary. You
                                might want to give Amtrak a call to see if the extra length would
                                cause them any problems. The Coast Starlight is the route I used to
                                ride.
                              • fblack947
                                Well, after three days in the ammonia, the leg is still very very stuck. The paint on the main KickStand body is starting to show some wear, so no more soaking
                                Message 15 of 20 , Aug 14, 2009
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                                  Well, after three days in the ammonia, the leg is still very very stuck.

                                  The paint on the main KickStand body is starting to show some wear, so no more soaking for me.

                                  I'm taking the hacksaw blade to it now... Hopefully XtraCycle can send me a replacement leg... I've just sent them an e-mail.

                                  -Jonathan
                                • Rick | Xtracycle, Inc
                                  Hey Jonathan, Did you get the new KickBack leg and body? Cheers, Rick ... -- graphic structuralist | rick@xtracycle.com 888 537 1401 x709 | the original
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Sep 2 10:11 AM
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                                    Hey Jonathan,

                                    Did you get the new KickBack leg and body?

                                    Cheers,
                                    Rick

                                    On Fri, Aug 7, 2009 at 4:36 PM, fblack947 <fblack947@...> wrote:
                                     

                                    Any hints on how to get the adjustable legs on the KickBack loose?

                                    I made a minor adjustment to my FreeRadical and now need to elongate the length of the KickBack legs.

                                    No problem! They're adjustable. Sweet.

                                    Actually, major problem: The adjustable legs appear to have frozen themselves into the main KickBack part.

                                    Thoughts? Suggestions?

                                    ------

                                    On a related note, one should probably plug the two holes on the top of the KickBack, which can be seen when the KickBack is in the retracted position. I'm guessing that water and dirt entering these holes haven't helped my situation, even though I run with fenders.

                                    -Jonathan
                                    Cleveland, OH




                                    --
                                    graphic structuralist | rick@...
                                    888 537 1401 x709 | the original longtail company
                                  • anthony_coley
                                    Hi Jonathan, Try and make something like an oil filter wrench and twist it out. Check here if you re not sure what I m talking about:
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Sep 3 10:03 AM
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                                      Hi Jonathan,

                                      Try and make something like an oil filter wrench and twist it out.

                                      Check here if you're not sure what I'm talking about:
                                      http://www.rvtoyoutlet.com/c-listall/p-RVT1054.html

                                      Suggestion:
                                      - get a leather belt and wrap it around itself on leg so it tightens on itself
                                      - figure out some way to put a loop on the end or use the buckle
                                      - put pry bar through loop and turn/twist leg
                                      - Also, I'd put the remover high up on the leg next to the kick-back so you don't bend the leg.

                                      When/if you get the legs out make sure and put grease on when you reinstall the legs..

                                      Good luck,
                                      AC


                                      > > Any hints on how to get the adjustable legs on the KickBack loose?
                                      > >
                                      > > I made a minor adjustment to my FreeRadical and now need to elongate the
                                      > > length of the KickBack legs.
                                      > >
                                      > > No problem! They're adjustable. Sweet.
                                      > >
                                      > > Actually, major problem: The adjustable legs appear to have frozen
                                      > > themselves into the main KickBack part.
                                      > >
                                      > > Thoughts? Suggestions?
                                      > >
                                      > > ------
                                      > >
                                      > > On a related note, one should probably plug the two holes on the top of the
                                      > > KickBack, which can be seen when the KickBack is in the retracted position.
                                      > > I'm guessing that water and dirt entering these holes haven't helped my
                                      > > situation, even though I run with fenders.
                                      > >
                                      > > -Jonathan
                                      > > Cleveland, OH
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > --
                                      > graphic structuralist | rick@...
                                      > 888 537 1401 x709 | the original longtail company
                                      >
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