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Re: bike blender and Kickback stand

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  • shokulan
    Let me rephrase the question... Has anyone tried the xtracycle bike blender with the kickback stand? Does the kickback stand extend down enough to keep the
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 1, 2009
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      Let me rephrase the question...

      Has anyone tried the xtracycle bike blender with the kickback stand? Does the kickback stand extend down enough to keep the rear wheel off the ground? In that position, is it steady enough to keep the bike stationary when blending?

      Thanks,

      CL

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "shokulan" <caralinb@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi folks,
      >
      > I'm daydreaming about what I'd buy if I had plenty of money. The bike blender is offered at Rock the Bike for the usual high price, including one that includes a rock-steady-stand. Anyone tried the bike blender with the kick back? If I have to buy a stand, I'd rather buy the kickback.
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > CL
      >
    • Andrew Kreps
      ... I m not a blender, but I do own a Kickback. You aren t going to be able to blend this way. It does extend far enough down to lift the rear wheel off the
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 1, 2009
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        On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 10:10 AM, shokulan<caralinb@...> wrote:
        > Does the kickback stand extend down enough to keep the rear wheel off the ground?
        >  In that position, is it steady enough to keep the bike stationary when blending?

        I'm not a blender, but I do own a Kickback. You aren't going to be
        able to blend this way. It does extend far enough down to lift the
        rear wheel off the ground, but -- and this is a big but -- once you
        add the blender weight, the rear wheel will hit the ground again.

        Additionally, with all of that weight on the kickback, it's going to
        dig into your boom tube and possibly do some frame damage. Xtracycle
        states plainly that the Kickback is meant to hold the weight of the
        bike alone, without you on it.

        My advice is to skip the stand and just blend while on the trail.
        That way it gets shaken _and_ stirred!
      • shokulan
        Thanks! That s exactly what I wanted to know. On the other hand, since the kickback attaches to the bike in exactly the same place the rock-steady stand
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 1, 2009
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          Thanks! That's exactly what I wanted to know. On the other hand, since the kickback attaches to the bike in exactly the same place the rock-steady stand does, how would one damage the frame and the other not? The kickback may not be meant to support driver weight, but from all the comments on this forum, it is supporting xtracycles loaded with kids, groceries, etc. I guess it is assisted, because the wheel is also on the ground.

          CL

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@...> wrote:
          >
          > On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 10:10 AM, shokulan<caralinb@...> wrote:
          > > Does the kickback stand extend down enough to keep the rear wheel off the ground?
          > >  In that position, is it steady enough to keep the bike stationary when blending?
          >
          > I'm not a blender, but I do own a Kickback. You aren't going to be
          > able to blend this way. It does extend far enough down to lift the
          > rear wheel off the ground, but -- and this is a big but -- once you
          > add the blender weight, the rear wheel will hit the ground again.
          >
          > Additionally, with all of that weight on the kickback, it's going to
          > dig into your boom tube and possibly do some frame damage. Xtracycle
          > states plainly that the Kickback is meant to hold the weight of the
          > bike alone, without you on it.
          >
          > My advice is to skip the stand and just blend while on the trail.
          > That way it gets shaken _and_ stirred!
          >
        • Pete B
          Whilst the Kickback and the Rock Steady attach at the same point, they are quite different in their application. The Kickback levers the vertical forces DOWN
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 2, 2009
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            Whilst the Kickback and the Rock Steady attach at the same point, they are quite different in their application.

            The Kickback levers the vertical forces DOWN on the transverse tube and UP against the lower boom on the FreeRad (or the ovalised tube on the Big Dummy). These tubes were not designed for the kind of forces present when the weight of the rider is added. The risk of denting or crimping the tubes is rather high especially if you are pedaling as, along with the static load, you will be adding dynamic forces fore-aft and side to side just where the frame is most susceptible.

            The Rock Steadys on the other hand have are stable in them selves with four points of contact with the ground. They transfer all the vertical forces directly through the the front transverse tube and the donor frame's dropouts (Probably the strongest point for vertical forces on any bike). It can handle all the static and dynamic loads generated when using the Bike Blender.

            Rgds
            Pete.B

            2009/7/2 shokulan <caralinb@...>


            Thanks! That's exactly what I wanted to know. On the other hand, since the kickback attaches to the bike in exactly the same place the rock-steady stand does, how would one damage the frame and the other not? The kickback may not be meant to support driver weight, but from all the comments on this forum, it is supporting xtracycles loaded with kids, groceries, etc. I guess it is assisted, because the wheel is also on the ground.

            CL

            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@...> wrote:


            >
            > On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 10:10 AM, shokulan<caralinb@...> wrote:
            > > Does the kickback stand extend down enough to keep the rear wheel off the ground?
            > >  In that position, is it steady enough to keep the bike stationary when blending?
            >
            > I'm not a blender, but I do own a Kickback. You aren't going to be
            > able to blend this way. It does extend far enough down to lift the
            > rear wheel off the ground, but -- and this is a big but -- once you
            > add the blender weight, the rear wheel will hit the ground again.
            >
            > Additionally, with all of that weight on the kickback, it's going to
            > dig into your boom tube and possibly do some frame damage. Xtracycle
            > states plainly that the Kickback is meant to hold the weight of the
            > bike alone, without you on it.
            >
            > My advice is to skip the stand and just blend while on the trail.
            > That way it gets shaken _and_ stirred!
            >


          • kipchogenotkip
            Hey Cara Lin, My band uses the Kickback to support our bikes while our audience members are human powering; we ve been doing it this way for a few months and
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 6, 2009
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              Hey Cara Lin,

              My band uses the Kickback to support our bikes while our audience members are human powering; we've been doing it this way for a few months and the kickback is way superior to any other stand we've used for this purpose, including the rock sturdy, which, frankly, makes a great blending (or human power) stand but is pretty worthless as a KICKSTAND that you'd use to support your load while stopping for a sec, or loading, b/c it takes too much effort to "engage".

              All that said, Xtracycle Inc is right! The kickback CAN damage your bike or itself while being used as a human supporter. I put a dent in the boom lower boom tube of my Big dummy, and I torqued the kickback a little bit so now it needs a nudge from the foot to stow. But the FreeRadicals in our crew did not suffer, likely because they benefit from the plastic frame hugging insert that will soon also be available for the big dummy.

              Our legs are extended so that the wheel doesn't touch the ground. On a couple of our bikes, we also modified the legs to be wider, as others here have done. Recommended! And I'm hoping that Xtracycle offers wider legs as an option at some point.

              paz,

              kipchoge
              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "shokulan" <caralinb@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks! That's exactly what I wanted to know. On the other hand, since the kickback attaches to the bike in exactly the same place the rock-steady stand does, how would one damage the frame and the other not? The kickback may not be meant to support driver weight, but from all the comments on this forum, it is supporting xtracycles loaded with kids, groceries, etc. I guess it is assisted, because the wheel is also on the ground.
              >
              > CL
              >
              > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@> wrote:
              > >
              > > On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 10:10 AM, shokulan<caralinb@> wrote:
              > > > Does the kickback stand extend down enough to keep the rear wheel off the ground?
              > > > �In that position, is it steady enough to keep the bike stationary when blending?
              > >
              > > I'm not a blender, but I do own a Kickback. You aren't going to be
              > > able to blend this way. It does extend far enough down to lift the
              > > rear wheel off the ground, but -- and this is a big but -- once you
              > > add the blender weight, the rear wheel will hit the ground again.
              > >
              > > Additionally, with all of that weight on the kickback, it's going to
              > > dig into your boom tube and possibly do some frame damage. Xtracycle
              > > states plainly that the Kickback is meant to hold the weight of the
              > > bike alone, without you on it.
              > >
              > > My advice is to skip the stand and just blend while on the trail.
              > > That way it gets shaken _and_ stirred!
              > >
              >
            • Rick | Xtracycle, Inc
              re: DIT Wider KickBack Legs ... -- graphic structuralist | rick@xtracycle.com
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 6, 2009
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                re: DIT Wider KickBack Legs

                On Mon, Jul 6, 2009 at 3:02 PM, kipchogenotkip <kipchoge@...> wrote:


                Hey Cara Lin,

                My band uses the Kickback to support our bikes while our audience members are human powering; we've been doing it this way for a few months and the kickback is way superior to any other stand we've used for this purpose, including the rock sturdy, which, frankly, makes a great blending (or human power) stand but is pretty worthless as a KICKSTAND that you'd use to support your load while stopping for a sec, or loading, b/c it takes too much effort to "engage".

                All that said, Xtracycle Inc is right! The kickback CAN damage your bike or itself while being used as a human supporter. I put a dent in the boom lower boom tube of my Big dummy, and I torqued the kickback a little bit so now it needs a nudge from the foot to stow. But the FreeRadicals in our crew did not suffer, likely because they benefit from the plastic frame hugging insert that will soon also be available for the big dummy.

                Our legs are extended so that the wheel doesn't touch the ground. On a couple of our bikes, we also modified the legs to be wider, as others here have done. Recommended! And I'm hoping that Xtracycle offers wider legs as an option at some point.

                paz,

                kipchoge


                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "shokulan" <caralinb@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thanks! That's exactly what I wanted to know. On the other hand, since the kickback attaches to the bike in exactly the same place the rock-steady stand does, how would one damage the frame and the other not? The kickback may not be meant to support driver weight, but from all the comments on this forum, it is supporting xtracycles loaded with kids, groceries, etc. I guess it is assisted, because the wheel is also on the ground.
                >
                > CL
                >
                > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@> wrote:
                > >
                > > On Wed, Jul 1, 2009 at 10:10 AM, shokulan<caralinb@> wrote:
                > > > Does the kickback stand extend down enough to keep the rear wheel off the ground?
                > > > �In that position, is it steady enough to keep the bike stationary when blending?

                > >
                > > I'm not a blender, but I do own a Kickback. You aren't going to be
                > > able to blend this way. It does extend far enough down to lift the
                > > rear wheel off the ground, but -- and this is a big but -- once you
                > > add the blender weight, the rear wheel will hit the ground again.
                > >
                > > Additionally, with all of that weight on the kickback, it's going to
                > > dig into your boom tube and possibly do some frame damage. Xtracycle
                > > states plainly that the Kickback is meant to hold the weight of the
                > > bike alone, without you on it.
                > >
                > > My advice is to skip the stand and just blend while on the trail.
                > > That way it gets shaken _and_ stirred!
                > >
                >




                --
                graphic structuralist | rick@...
                888 537 1401 x709 | the original longtail company
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