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Xtracycle LLC to sell Surly Big Dummy

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  • jparks781
    I found this intriguing notice in the Xtracycle forums Xtracycle Forum Index - Product Suggestions - Surly Big Dummy frameset: rock* Xtracycle Staff
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 11, 2007
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      I found this intriguing notice in the Xtracycle forums  Xtracycle Forum Index  -> Product Suggestions -> Surly Big Dummy frameset:

      "rock*
      Xtracycle Staff
          
      PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2007 2:52 pm

      Xtracycle is planning to offer a complete build of the Big Dummy once the frame is ready.

      We haven't finished spec'ing it yet, but the complete bike will likely be in the $1600-$2000 range."
      http://xtracycle.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1270 

      I'm collecting opinions on what equipment to use on a Big Dummy, from bars to wheels. 

      Anyone care to offer specific suggestions? 
    • David Chase
      ... I am not sure who your market is, but once you hit forty, if you still try to cycle hard, you get much more finicky about handlebars. Those
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 11, 2007
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        > I'm collecting opinions on what equipment to use on a Big Dummy,
        > from bars to wheels.
        >
        > Anyone care to offer specific suggestions?
        I am not sure who your market is, but once you hit forty, if
        you still try to cycle hard, you get much more finicky about
        handlebars. Those mostly-straight-across mountain bars don't
        seem at all good for middle-aged hands; numb fingers in 3 miles,
        that sort of thing. On a long trip this summer, two of us pinched
        the very same nerve (attached to the pinky side of the ring finger)
        despite being diligent with gloves, nudging the bars up and in to
        try to reduce the weight on our hands, etc.

        So, for me at least, flat bars are crap. I use moustache-style
        bars, double-wrapped with tape, and do better with those. I'm
        still fiddling, trying to get more places to put my hands.

        I'v got bar-end shifters, indexed, and I think they're great,
        except that every once in a while I jab myself in the thigh with
        a shift lever and it leaves a bruise.

        Also, when I was younger, I ripped my (drop) handlebars in half,
        twice. I suggest that you not use wimpy handlebars.

        I have no idea what the right seat should be. It is my belief
        that the seat manufacturers of this world are making a lot of
        money off of people who aren't waiting one week for their butts
        to get a little tougher. The bike I bought back around 2003
        had one of those padded "comfort" seats, it felt like it was
        trying to rip my pelvis in half, I went back to a much harder
        seat and I'm doing just fine (50 miles/week -- did a 300-mile
        week this summer). I had a shock seatpost for a while, but I
        decided it wasn't long enough, and I do just fine without it.

        I ride skinny high-pressure tires (700c x 28) when it's not
        winter, and I like them very much. I am upgrading my rear
        wheel to 36 (DH13) spokes, Dyad Velocity, Shimano XT M-760
        (disk). That is, I would not assume that people are going to
        be putting giant fat tires on these bikes, I don't think it is
        at all necessary. (So do you expect to sell more for street
        use, or off-road use? Could you sell two configurations?)

        I recommend disk brakes, probably not the cheap Shimano ones
        that I use. People seem to say good thing about Avid brakes.

        I'm a huge fan of SPD pedals.

        yours,

        David Chase
      • Dane Buson
        ... Not necessarily specific to the Big Dummy, but I do have one thing. I m surprised they don t offer anything beefier than a 36 spoke wheel, at least as an
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 12, 2007
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          On Feb 12, jparks781 was accused of saying:

          > Xtracycle is planning to offer a complete build of the Big Dummy once
          > the frame is ready.
          >
          > We haven't finished spec'ing it yet, but the complete bike will likely
          > be in the $1600-$2000 range."
          > http://xtracycle.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1270
          > <http://xtracycle.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1270>
          >
          > I'm collecting opinions on what equipment to use on a Big Dummy, from
          > bars to wheels.
          >
          > Anyone care to offer specific suggestions?

          Not necessarily specific to the Big Dummy, but I do have one thing. I'm
          surprised they don't offer anything beefier than a 36 spoke wheel, at
          least as an option. One of the first things I did was build up a 48
          spoke wheel based on a Gusset Jury (Downhill / Trials) hub for my Xtra.
          I have had enough problems with wheels on my regular commuter that I
          didn't want to take chances with my cargo bike.

          --
          Dane Buson - Buson@...
          The flow chart is a most thoroughly oversold piece of program documentation.
          -- Frederick Brooks, "The Mythical Man Month"
        • Bruce Alan Wilson
          For a seat, I use a no-nose, like this one: http://www.heartlandamerica.com/browse/item.asp?product=easyseat-adjustable-bike
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 14, 2007
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            Re: Xtracycle LLC to sell Surly Big Dummy

            For a seat, I use a no-nose, like this one:

            http://www.heartlandamerica.com/browse/item.asp?product=easyseat-adjustable-bike-seat&PIN=6819&GUID=103B9B42-DBDE-4381-8489-0280F1D4C43C&BC=S&DL=SEH1

            Far better adapted to the male body than a traditional seat, which tends to pinch and squeeze somewhere that ought not to be pinched or squeezed.

            Bruce Alan Wilson

            "The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man.  Other forms of transport grow daily more nightmarish.  Only the bicycle remains pure in heart."--Iris Murdoch

          • Paul Rychnovsky
            for a seat, it s got to be a Brooks, something sprung like a B67 Paul ... From: Bruce Alan Wilson To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wednesday, February
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 15, 2007
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              for a seat, it's got to be a Brooks, something sprung like a B67
               
              Paul
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Wednesday, February 14, 2007 10:03 PM
              Subject: [rootsradicals] Re: Xtracycle LLC to sell Surly Big Dummy

              For a seat, I use a no-nose, like this one:

              http://www.heartlan damerica. com/browse/ item.asp? product=easyseat -adjustable- bike-seat&PIN=6819&GUID=103B9B42- DBDE-4381- 8489-0280F1D4C43 C&BC=S&DL=SEH1

              Far better adapted to the male body than a traditional seat, which tends to pinch and squeeze somewhere that ought not to be pinched or squeezed.

              Bruce Alan Wilson

              "The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man.  Other forms of transport grow daily more nightmarish.  Only the bicycle remains pure in heart."--Iris Murdoch


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            • Susan
              Hmmm... my two cents as a commuter who got the Xtra because the most common reason I couldn t ride someplace was that I had to carry stuff, but I don t usually
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 27, 2007
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                Hmmm... my two cents as a commuter who got the Xtra because the most
                common reason I couldn't ride someplace was that I had to carry stuff,
                but I don't usually carry *tons* of stuff.

                I think moustache handlebars would be "the bomb." (Though I typed
                "the boomb" the first time and maybe that's a better word - has a more
                womby feeling ;)) Should appeal to a wide market.

                Seats are so personal! I'd love a "buy your own seat" option; don't
                know if you should have a mens vs womens difference in seats or not.

                Lights as options, too? A la a nice hub generator wheel? LEDs to
                string around the snapdeck?

                Bud vase?

                I'm not a tecchie... my LBS dude takes care of that stuff for me.
                He's building me a generator wheel for my Xtra as we speak...


                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "jparks781" <joel.parks@...> wrote:
                >
                > I found this intriguing notice in the Xtracycle forums Xtracycle Forum
                > Index -> Product Suggestions -> Surly Big Dummy frameset:
                >
                > "rock*
                > Xtracycle Staff
                >
                > PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2007 2:52 pm
                >
                > Xtracycle is planning to offer a complete build of the Big Dummy once
                > the frame is ready.
                >
                > We haven't finished spec'ing it yet, but the complete bike will likely
                > be in the $1600-$2000 range."
                > http://xtracycle.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1270
                > <http://xtracycle.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1270>
                >
                > I'm collecting opinions on what equipment to use on a Big Dummy, from
                > bars to wheels.
                >
                > Anyone care to offer specific suggestions?
                >
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