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One Year Later - considering options

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  • beth hamon
    So it s nearly a year since I built up my mid-80 s Cycle Pro ATB into an Xtracycle. Here are my findings: 1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow.
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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      So it's nearly a year since I built up my mid-80's Cycle Pro ATB into an Xtracycle. Here are my findings:

      1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow. Confident that the worst of the epic winter weather was behind us I'd ridden the X to the shop to teach a class. As the sun set, wet snow fell. By the time the class let out there was an inch or so of sloppy, wet snow on the ground. Riding in the newly-fallen stuff was okay, but once I got onto regularly-used streets things got slippy and scary. A five-mile ride took me over an hour and by the time I got home I was sweaty, shaky and miserable.

      2. Best moment on the X: Riding with a full cargo of lawn chairs, beer and a huge picnic basket to a downtown concert at Waterfront Park last August, and enjoying appreciative stares and smiles from onlookers as I politely rang my bell.

      3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor. Building up an X from a mid-80's ATB frame has increased the flex in the bottom bracket area. It's not exactly dangerous -- and I do check the attachment bolts periodically to make sure nothing's come loose -- but it continues to be an unsettling feeling, heightened whenever I carry a load of more than about 35 lbs.

      4. The Slug factor: Each time I ride the X I have to remind myself that I have a different relationship with the concept of "speed" on this thing. The X simply goes slower, because I go slower on heavier bikes. So I have to give myself more time to get places on the X than on my single bike. That said, I find that, being somewhat out of shape from a snowy winter of inactivity and a spring full of allergy issues, I am less inclined to ride the X than I'd thought I'd be. There's no taking it on public transit (the wheelbase is too long to flip up into a hook on light rail, and X's are not allowed on TriMet buses at all), so any time I ride it I have to commit to riding the full distance. I have ridden with the X far more in the past year than I used my trailer in five. However, because of additional chronic fatigue factors that come and go, I have ridden the X less often than I would have liked for the investment.

      All of these factors combined have led to this conclusion:

      I like the X. I even like it enough to keep it, even though it takes up a lot of room in my tiny, limited storage space. But The frame it's built onto right now makes riding it less pleasant than I would like. Money is ridiculously tight, so swapping parts over to a stiffer Big Dummy frame isn't an option (unless someone out there wants to sell me a used 18" BD frameset...). However, I realize that at some point I will probably have to either add some kind of electric assist, or sell the X and limit my load-carrying to that which will fit in my Bike Buckets.

      I would prefer not to have to mess with electric assist. It's just another layer of complication for someone who is used to working on her own bikes and keeping things simple. Adding an electric motor will not keep it simple for me. I will start by changing the gearing and seeing if that make enough of a difference for me. But I admit that I'm not enough of an enthusiast to make the X my primary bicycle, and that's something.

      Beth
    • John Wilde
      I have had my X almost a year,I love it.I own two other bikes that I haven t even ridden since I got the X. Being a Fred I don t have issues with speed or
      Message 2 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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        I have had my X almost a year,I love it.I own two other bikes that I haven't even ridden since I got the X.
        Being a "Fred" I don't have issues with speed or lack thereof.(I just recently discovered that I am a "Fred".)
        I had already reached the point where I needed to add elecric assist.I wish I had done that sooner.
        As near as I can figure,I have ridden  approx.2,000 miles since the second week of June last year.The last 350 miles have been since I added the e-assist.
        I hadn't noticed frame flex issues. The first few loads I did have some minor handling issues.
        If I was to do it over again,I would go with a BD w/e-assist from the getgo.My X is my primary ride to and from work,as well as running errands.
        Peace and Blessings,
        John
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 10:43 AM
        Subject: [rootsradicals] One Year Later - considering options

        So it's nearly a year since I built up my mid-80's Cycle Pro ATB into an Xtracycle. Here are my findings:

        1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow. Confident that the worst of the epic winter weather was behind us I'd ridden the X to the shop to teach a class. As the sun set, wet snow fell. By the time the class let out there was an inch or so of sloppy, wet snow on the ground. Riding in the newly-fallen stuff was okay, but once I got onto regularly-used streets things got slippy and scary. A five-mile ride took me over an hour and by the time I got home I was sweaty, shaky and miserable.

        2. Best moment on the X: Riding with a full cargo of lawn chairs, beer and a huge picnic basket to a downtown concert at Waterfront Park last August, and enjoying appreciative stares and smiles from onlookers as I politely rang my bell.

        3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor. Building up an X from a mid-80's ATB frame has increased the flex in the bottom bracket area. It's not exactly dangerous -- and I do check the attachment bolts periodically to make sure nothing's come loose -- but it continues to be an unsettling feeling, heightened whenever I carry a load of more than about 35 lbs.

        4. The Slug factor: Each time I ride the X I have to remind myself that I have a different relationship with the concept of "speed" on this thing. The X simply goes slower, because I go slower on heavier bikes. So I have to give myself more time to get places on the X than on my single bike. That said, I find that, being somewhat out of shape from a snowy winter of inactivity and a spring full of allergy issues, I am less inclined to ride the X than I'd thought I'd be. There's no taking it on public transit (the wheelbase is too long to flip up into a hook on light rail, and X's are not allowed on TriMet buses at all), so any time I ride it I have to commit to riding the full distance. I have ridden with the X far more in the past year than I used my trailer in five. However, because of additional chronic fatigue factors that come and go, I have ridden the X less often than I would have liked for the investment.

        All of these factors combined have led to this conclusion:

        I like the X. I even like it enough to keep it, even though it takes up a lot of room in my tiny, limited storage space. But The frame it's built onto right now makes riding it less pleasant than I would like. Money is ridiculously tight, so swapping parts over to a stiffer Big Dummy frame isn't an option (unless someone out there wants to sell me a used 18" BD frameset...) . However, I realize that at some point I will probably have to either add some kind of electric assist, or sell the X and limit my load-carrying to that which will fit in my Bike Buckets.

        I would prefer not to have to mess with electric assist. It's just another layer of complication for someone who is used to working on her own bikes and keeping things simple. Adding an electric motor will not keep it simple for me. I will start by changing the gearing and seeing if that make enough of a difference for me. But I admit that I'm not enough of an enthusiast to make the X my primary bicycle, and that's something.

        Beth

      • Connie Gordon
        Um, what s a Fred? On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 11:26 AM, John Wilde
        Message 3 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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          Um, what's a Fred?

          On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 11:26 AM, John Wilde <johnwilde@...> wrote:


          I have had my X almost a year,I love it.I own two other bikes that I haven't even ridden since I got the X.
          Being a "Fred" I don't have issues with speed or lack thereof.(I just recently discovered that I am a "Fred".)
          I had already reached the point where I needed to add elecric assist.I wish I had done that sooner.
          As near as I can figure,I have ridden  approx.2,000 miles since the second week of June last year.The last 350 miles have been since I added the e-assist.
          I hadn't noticed frame flex issues. The first few loads I did have some minor handling issues.
          If I was to do it over again,I would go with a BD w/e-assist from the getgo.My X is my primary ride to and from work,as well as running errands.
          Peace and Blessings,
          John
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 10:43 AM
          Subject: [rootsradicals] One Year Later - considering options

          So it's nearly a year since I built up my mid-80's Cycle Pro ATB into an Xtracycle. Here are my findings:

          1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow. Confident that the worst of the epic winter weather was behind us I'd ridden the X to the shop to teach a class. As the sun set, wet snow fell. By the time the class let out there was an inch or so of sloppy, wet snow on the ground. Riding in the newly-fallen stuff was okay, but once I got onto regularly-used streets things got slippy and scary. A five-mile ride took me over an hour and by the time I got home I was sweaty, shaky and miserable.

          2. Best moment on the X: Riding with a full cargo of lawn chairs, beer and a huge picnic basket to a downtown concert at Waterfront Park last August, and enjoying appreciative stares and smiles from onlookers as I politely rang my bell.

          3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor. Building up an X from a mid-80's ATB frame has increased the flex in the bottom bracket area. It's not exactly dangerous -- and I do check the attachment bolts periodically to make sure nothing's come loose -- but it continues to be an unsettling feeling, heightened whenever I carry a load of more than about 35 lbs.

          4. The Slug factor: Each time I ride the X I have to remind myself that I have a different relationship with the concept of "speed" on this thing. The X simply goes slower, because I go slower on heavier bikes. So I have to give myself more time to get places on the X than on my single bike. That said, I find that, being somewhat out of shape from a snowy winter of inactivity and a spring full of allergy issues, I am less inclined to ride the X than I'd thought I'd be. There's no taking it on public transit (the wheelbase is too long to flip up into a hook on light rail, and X's are not allowed on TriMet buses at all), so any time I ride it I have to commit to riding the full distance. I have ridden with the X far more in the past year than I used my trailer in five. However, because of additional chronic fatigue factors that come and go, I have ridden the X less often than I would have liked for the investment.

          All of these factors combined have led to this conclusion:

          I like the X. I even like it enough to keep it, even though it takes up a lot of room in my tiny, limited storage space. But The frame it's built onto right now makes riding it less pleasant than I would like. Money is ridiculously tight, so swapping parts over to a stiffer Big Dummy frame isn't an option (unless someone out there wants to sell me a used 18" BD frameset...). However, I realize that at some point I will probably have to either add some kind of electric assist, or sell the X and limit my load-carrying to that which will fit in my Bike Buckets.

          I would prefer not to have to mess with electric assist. It's just another layer of complication for someone who is used to working on her own bikes and keeping things simple. Adding an electric motor will not keep it simple for me. I will start by changing the gearing and seeing if that make enough of a difference for me. But I admit that I'm not enough of an enthusiast to make the X my primary bicycle, and that's something.

          Beth


        • Neil Walsh
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_(bicycling) Neil
          Message 4 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_(bicycling)

            Neil

            On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:15 PM, Connie Gordon <rev.cgordon@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Um, what's a Fred?
            >
            > On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 11:26 AM, John Wilde <johnwilde@...>
            > wrote:
            >>
            >>
            >> I have had my X almost a year,I love it.I own two other bikes that I
            >> haven't even ridden since I got the X.
            >> Being a "Fred" I don't have issues with speed or lack thereof.(I just
            >> recently discovered that I am a "Fred".)
            >> I had already reached the point where I needed to add elecric assist.I
            >> wish I had done that sooner.
            >> As near as I can figure,I have ridden  approx.2,000 miles since the second
            >> week of June last year.The last 350 miles have been since I added the
            >> e-assist.
            >> I hadn't noticed frame flex issues. The first few loads I did have some
            >> minor handling issues.
            >> If I was to do it over again,I would go with a BD w/e-assist from the
            >> getgo.My X is my primary ride to and from work,as well as running errands.
            >> Peace and Blessings,
            >> John
            >>
            >> ----- Original Message -----
            >> From: beth hamon
            >> To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            >> Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 10:43 AM
            >> Subject: [rootsradicals] One Year Later - considering options
            >>
            >> So it's nearly a year since I built up my mid-80's Cycle Pro ATB into an
            >> Xtracycle. Here are my findings:
            >>
            >> 1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow. Confident that the
            >> worst of the epic winter weather was behind us I'd ridden the X to the shop
            >> to teach a class. As the sun set, wet snow fell. By the time the class let
            >> out there was an inch or so of sloppy, wet snow on the ground. Riding in the
            >> newly-fallen stuff was okay, but once I got onto regularly-used streets
            >> things got slippy and scary. A five-mile ride took me over an hour and by
            >> the time I got home I was sweaty, shaky and miserable.
            >>
            >> 2. Best moment on the X: Riding with a full cargo of lawn chairs, beer and
            >> a huge picnic basket to a downtown concert at Waterfront Park last August,
            >> and enjoying appreciative stares and smiles from onlookers as I politely
            >> rang my bell.
            >>
            >> 3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor. Building up an X
            >> from a mid-80's ATB frame has increased the flex in the bottom bracket area.
            >> It's not exactly dangerous -- and I do check the attachment bolts
            >> periodically to make sure nothing's come loose -- but it continues to be an
            >> unsettling feeling, heightened whenever I carry a load of more than about 35
            >> lbs.
            >>
            >> 4. The Slug factor: Each time I ride the X I have to remind myself that I
            >> have a different relationship with the concept of "speed" on this thing. The
            >> X simply goes slower, because I go slower on heavier bikes. So I have to
            >> give myself more time to get places on the X than on my single bike. That
            >> said, I find that, being somewhat out of shape from a snowy winter of
            >> inactivity and a spring full of allergy issues, I am less inclined to ride
            >> the X than I'd thought I'd be. There's no taking it on public transit (the
            >> wheelbase is too long to flip up into a hook on light rail, and X's are not
            >> allowed on TriMet buses at all), so any time I ride it I have to commit to
            >> riding the full distance. I have ridden with the X far more in the past year
            >> than I used my trailer in five. However, because of additional chronic
            >> fatigue factors that come and go, I have ridden the X less often than I
            >> would have liked for the investment.
            >>
            >> All of these factors combined have led to this conclusion:
            >>
            >> I like the X. I even like it enough to keep it, even though it takes up a
            >> lot of room in my tiny, limited storage space. But The frame it's built onto
            >> right now makes riding it less pleasant than I would like. Money is
            >> ridiculously tight, so swapping parts over to a stiffer Big Dummy frame
            >> isn't an option (unless someone out there wants to sell me a used 18" BD
            >> frameset...). However, I realize that at some point I will probably have to
            >> either add some kind of electric assist, or sell the X and limit my
            >> load-carrying to that which will fit in my Bike Buckets.
            >>
            >> I would prefer not to have to mess with electric assist. It's just another
            >> layer of complication for someone who is used to working on her own bikes
            >> and keeping things simple. Adding an electric motor will not keep it simple
            >> for me. I will start by changing the gearing and seeing if that make enough
            >> of a difference for me. But I admit that I'm not enough of an enthusiast to
            >> make the X my primary bicycle, and that's something.
            >>
            >> Beth
            >>
            >
            >
          • Anabel
            Ok, now I have a goal of becoming a Doris. Too much fun!:) Anabel
            Message 5 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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              Ok, now I have a goal of becoming a Doris.  Too much fun!
              :)
              Anabel

              On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 12:24 PM, Neil Walsh <walsh.neil@...> wrote:


              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_(bicycling)

              Neil



              On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:15 PM, Connie Gordon <rev.cgordon@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Um, what's a Fred?
              >
              > On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 11:26 AM, John Wilde <johnwilde@...>
              > wrote:
              >>
              >>
              >> I have had my X almost a year,I love it.I own two other bikes that I
              >> haven't even ridden since I got the X.
              >> Being a "Fred" I don't have issues with speed or lack thereof.(I just
              >> recently discovered that I am a "Fred".)
              >> I had already reached the point where I needed to add elecric assist.I
              >> wish I had done that sooner.
              >> As near as I can figure,I have ridden  approx.2,000 miles since the second
              >> week of June last year.The last 350 miles have been since I added the
              >> e-assist.
              >> I hadn't noticed frame flex issues. The first few loads I did have some
              >> minor handling issues.
              >> If I was to do it over again,I would go with a BD w/e-assist from the
              >> getgo.My X is my primary ride to and from work,as well as running errands.
              >> Peace and Blessings,
              >> John
              >>
              >> ----- Original Message -----
              >> From: beth hamon
              >> To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
              >> Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 10:43 AM
              >> Subject: [rootsradicals] One Year Later - considering options
              >>
              >> So it's nearly a year since I built up my mid-80's Cycle Pro ATB into an
              >> Xtracycle. Here are my findings:
              >>
              >> 1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow. Confident that the
              >> worst of the epic winter weather was behind us I'd ridden the X to the shop
              >> to teach a class. As the sun set, wet snow fell. By the time the class let
              >> out there was an inch or so of sloppy, wet snow on the ground. Riding in the
              >> newly-fallen stuff was okay, but once I got onto regularly-used streets
              >> things got slippy and scary. A five-mile ride took me over an hour and by
              >> the time I got home I was sweaty, shaky and miserable.
              >>
              >> 2. Best moment on the X: Riding with a full cargo of lawn chairs, beer and
              >> a huge picnic basket to a downtown concert at Waterfront Park last August,
              >> and enjoying appreciative stares and smiles from onlookers as I politely
              >> rang my bell.
              >>
              >> 3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor. Building up an X
              >> from a mid-80's ATB frame has increased the flex in the bottom bracket area.
              >> It's not exactly dangerous -- and I do check the attachment bolts
              >> periodically to make sure nothing's come loose -- but it continues to be an
              >> unsettling feeling, heightened whenever I carry a load of more than about 35
              >> lbs.
              >>
              >> 4. The Slug factor: Each time I ride the X I have to remind myself that I
              >> have a different relationship with the concept of "speed" on this thing. The
              >> X simply goes slower, because I go slower on heavier bikes. So I have to
              >> give myself more time to get places on the X than on my single bike. That
              >> said, I find that, being somewhat out of shape from a snowy winter of
              >> inactivity and a spring full of allergy issues, I am less inclined to ride
              >> the X than I'd thought I'd be. There's no taking it on public transit (the
              >> wheelbase is too long to flip up into a hook on light rail, and X's are not
              >> allowed on TriMet buses at all), so any time I ride it I have to commit to
              >> riding the full distance. I have ridden with the X far more in the past year
              >> than I used my trailer in five. However, because of additional chronic
              >> fatigue factors that come and go, I have ridden the X less often than I
              >> would have liked for the investment.
              >>
              >> All of these factors combined have led to this conclusion:
              >>
              >> I like the X. I even like it enough to keep it, even though it takes up a
              >> lot of room in my tiny, limited storage space. But The frame it's built onto
              >> right now makes riding it less pleasant than I would like. Money is
              >> ridiculously tight, so swapping parts over to a stiffer Big Dummy frame
              >> isn't an option (unless someone out there wants to sell me a used 18" BD
              >> frameset...). However, I realize that at some point I will probably have to
              >> either add some kind of electric assist, or sell the X and limit my
              >> load-carrying to that which will fit in my Bike Buckets.
              >>
              >> I would prefer not to have to mess with electric assist. It's just another
              >> layer of complication for someone who is used to working on her own bikes
              >> and keeping things simple. Adding an electric motor will not keep it simple
              >> for me. I will start by changing the gearing and seeing if that make enough
              >> of a difference for me. But I admit that I'm not enough of an enthusiast to
              >> make the X my primary bicycle, and that's something.
              >>
              >> Beth
              >>
              >
              >


            • Connie Gordon
              Nice to meet you Fred, I m Doris 8-)
              Message 6 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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                Nice to meet you Fred, I'm Doris 8-)

                On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 1:24 PM, Neil Walsh <walsh.neil@...> wrote:


                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_(bicycling)

                Neil



                On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 8:15 PM, Connie Gordon <rev.cgordon@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Um, what's a Fred?
                >
                > On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 11:26 AM, John Wilde <johnwilde@...>
                > wrote:
                >>
                >>
                >> I have had my X almost a year,I love it.I own two other bikes that I
                >> haven't even ridden since I got the X.
                >> Being a "Fred" I don't have issues with speed or lack thereof.(I just
                >> recently discovered that I am a "Fred".)
                >> I had already reached the point where I needed to add elecric assist.I
                >> wish I had done that sooner.
                >> As near as I can figure,I have ridden  approx.2,000 miles since the second
                >> week of June last year.The last 350 miles have been since I added the
                >> e-assist.
                >> I hadn't noticed frame flex issues. The first few loads I did have some
                >> minor handling issues.
                >> If I was to do it over again,I would go with a BD w/e-assist from the
                >> getgo.My X is my primary ride to and from work,as well as running errands.
                >> Peace and Blessings,
                >> John
                >>
                >> ----- Original Message -----
                >> From: beth hamon
                >> To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                >> Sent: Wednesday, April 29, 2009 10:43 AM
                >> Subject: [rootsradicals] One Year Later - considering options
                >>
                >> So it's nearly a year since I built up my mid-80's Cycle Pro ATB into an
                >> Xtracycle. Here are my findings:
                >>
                >> 1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow. Confident that the
                >> worst of the epic winter weather was behind us I'd ridden the X to the shop
                >> to teach a class. As the sun set, wet snow fell. By the time the class let
                >> out there was an inch or so of sloppy, wet snow on the ground. Riding in the
                >> newly-fallen stuff was okay, but once I got onto regularly-used streets
                >> things got slippy and scary. A five-mile ride took me over an hour and by
                >> the time I got home I was sweaty, shaky and miserable.
                >>
                >> 2. Best moment on the X: Riding with a full cargo of lawn chairs, beer and
                >> a huge picnic basket to a downtown concert at Waterfront Park last August,
                >> and enjoying appreciative stares and smiles from onlookers as I politely
                >> rang my bell.
                >>
                >> 3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor. Building up an X
                >> from a mid-80's ATB frame has increased the flex in the bottom bracket area.
                >> It's not exactly dangerous -- and I do check the attachment bolts
                >> periodically to make sure nothing's come loose -- but it continues to be an
                >> unsettling feeling, heightened whenever I carry a load of more than about 35
                >> lbs.
                >>
                >> 4. The Slug factor: Each time I ride the X I have to remind myself that I
                >> have a different relationship with the concept of "speed" on this thing. The
                >> X simply goes slower, because I go slower on heavier bikes. So I have to
                >> give myself more time to get places on the X than on my single bike. That
                >> said, I find that, being somewhat out of shape from a snowy winter of
                >> inactivity and a spring full of allergy issues, I am less inclined to ride
                >> the X than I'd thought I'd be. There's no taking it on public transit (the
                >> wheelbase is too long to flip up into a hook on light rail, and X's are not
                >> allowed on TriMet buses at all), so any time I ride it I have to commit to
                >> riding the full distance. I have ridden with the X far more in the past year
                >> than I used my trailer in five. However, because of additional chronic
                >> fatigue factors that come and go, I have ridden the X less often than I
                >> would have liked for the investment.
                >>
                >> All of these factors combined have led to this conclusion:
                >>
                >> I like the X. I even like it enough to keep it, even though it takes up a
                >> lot of room in my tiny, limited storage space. But The frame it's built onto
                >> right now makes riding it less pleasant than I would like. Money is
                >> ridiculously tight, so swapping parts over to a stiffer Big Dummy frame
                >> isn't an option (unless someone out there wants to sell me a used 18" BD
                >> frameset...). However, I realize that at some point I will probably have to
                >> either add some kind of electric assist, or sell the X and limit my
                >> load-carrying to that which will fit in my Bike Buckets.
                >>
                >> I would prefer not to have to mess with electric assist. It's just another
                >> layer of complication for someone who is used to working on her own bikes
                >> and keeping things simple. Adding an electric motor will not keep it simple
                >> for me. I will start by changing the gearing and seeing if that make enough
                >> of a difference for me. But I admit that I'm not enough of an enthusiast to
                >> make the X my primary bicycle, and that's something.
                >>
                >> Beth
                >>
                >
                >


              • Phil Good-Elliott
                Earth to Doris! Earth to Doris! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UDNSCL8v0E -Phil (aka Phred)
                Message 7 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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                  Earth to Doris! Earth to Doris!

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UDNSCL8v0E

                  -Phil (aka Phred)

                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Connie Gordon <rev.cgordon@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Nice to meet you Fred, I'm Doris 8-)
                  >
                  >
                • David Chase
                  ... That sounds wrong to me. I m built up on a newer bike, but nothing special (a Specialized hybrid, aluminum, with a front shock), and unless you are a
                  Message 8 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    On 2009-04-29, at 10:43 AM, beth hamon wrote:
                    > 3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor. Building up an
                    > X from a mid-80's ATB frame has increased the flex in the bottom
                    > bracket area. It's not exactly dangerous -- and I do check the
                    > attachment bolts periodically to make sure nothing's come loose --
                    > but it continues to be an unsettling feeling, heightened whenever I
                    > carry a load of more than about 35 lbs.
                    >
                    That sounds wrong to me. I'm built up on a "newer" bike, but nothing
                    special (a Specialized hybrid, aluminum, with a front shock), and
                    unless you are a Woman Of Size, odds are good I outweigh you (never
                    less than 220 lbs, just me). I should be flexing the crap out of my
                    rig. I often carry more than 35lbs, and am happy riding no-hands with
                    50. I did once carry a roll of tar paper that stuck out the back, and
                    I got fantastically unsettling oscillations (period of 1 or 2 seconds
                    -- it was like sailing in a heavy swell), but that was very abnormal.
                    And for example, today when I rode in to work (10 miles) I trailed
                    another bike to loan to a colleague for his wife to try, along with
                    the usual tools+clothes+backpack. Just lash it on, and go.

                    So either something's goofy with your frame, or else my weight is
                    working to my advantage and is in some way killing off the weird
                    oscillations that I might get. You are doing the standard game of
                    putting your heavy stuff low and forward, right? My worry is that it
                    really is a matter of rider weight -- that these cargo bikes are big
                    bikes, and are most comfortable for big people, who can make the bike
                    do what they want (and thus, if I recommended one to someone half my
                    mass, that I would be doing them quite a disservice).
                    > 4. The Slug factor: Each time I ride the X I have to remind myself
                    > that I have a different relationship with the concept of "speed" on
                    > this thing. The X simply goes slower, because I go slower on heavier
                    > bikes. So I have to give myself more time to get places on the X
                    > than on my single bike. That said, I find that, being somewhat out
                    > of shape from a snowy winter of inactivity and a spring full of
                    > allergy issues, I am less inclined to ride the X than I'd thought
                    > I'd be. There's no taking it on public transit (the wheelbase is too
                    > long to flip up into a hook on light rail, and X's are not allowed
                    > on TriMet buses at all), so any time I ride it I have to commit to
                    > riding the full distance. I have ridden with the X far more in the
                    > past year than I used my trailer in five. However, because of
                    > additional chronic fatigue factors that come and go, I have ridden
                    > the X less often than I would have liked for the investment.
                    >

                    Do you measure? Heavy bikes feel slow, but they are not necessarily
                    that slow once started. I've ridden similar distances to my usual
                    commute, on a really good bike (Titanium Spectrum, my size) and the
                    range of speeds reported is only somewhat higher (and generally
                    overlapping).

                    Of course, perception may matter more than measurement. If you're not
                    having fun, that's no good, no matter what the speedometer says. What
                    I found improved my mood quite a lot, big fat tires, because I just
                    ride right through stuff that would have required care and swerving
                    with the skinny tires.

                    David
                  • Connie Gordon
                    [G] yup, that about covers it.
                    Message 9 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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                      [G] yup, that about covers it.

                      On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 2:03 PM, Phil Good-Elliott <b4kids@...> wrote:


                      Earth to Doris! Earth to Doris!

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UDNSCL8v0E

                      -Phil (aka Phred)



                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Connie Gordon <rev.cgordon@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Nice to meet you Fred, I'm Doris 8-)
                      >
                      >


                    • Mark Garvey
                      OK, some commentary from a devoted X rider! ... Boy Howdy! I H8 D Sno! nasty stuff, why the HELL I live in iowa I do not know! But I won t Move unless I am
                      Message 10 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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                        OK, some commentary from a devoted X rider!

                        On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 9:43 AM, beth hamon <periwinklekog@...> wrote:
                        So it's nearly a year since I built up my mid-80's Cycle Pro ATB into an Xtracycle. Here are my findings:

                        1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow.
                        Boy Howdy!  I H8 D Sno!   nasty stuff, why the HELL I live in iowa I do not know!  But I won't Move unless I am offered a REALLY REALLY great job.  (Lemme see, Demi Moore as my secretary, a NEW BD with a Stokemonkey as my personal vehicle, a really GREAT home, not large but very comfortable would do....And of course, My favorite children's entertainment venue within easy bike distance!....nawwwww. It won't happen!)


                        2. Best moment on the X: Riding with a full cargo of lawn chairs, beer and a huge picnic basket

                        Oh BABY!  Isn't that a KICK!??


                        3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor.

                        I have honestly had ZERO trouble with this

                        4. The Slug factor:

                        Ummmmm, the X is a CARGO bike.  Not a sports bike. It is going to be the difference between the Porche and a Kenworth. BOTH are excellent Vehicles.  But for different reasons and for different things.  I LIKE trucks better than sports cars.  More useful, and better karma.

                        All of these factors combined have led to this conclusion:

                        I like the X.

                        Me Also.  In fact I LOVE MY X!  It is My Mostest Favoritest bike EVER!  the only one that comes CLOSE is my Mid 60's Schwinn Typhoon with the 2 speed Bendix Kick back hub!  Gosh I love those bikes!


                        I would prefer not to have to mess with electric assist. It's just another layer of complication . But I admit that I'm not enough of an enthusiast to make the X my primary bicycle, and that's something.

                        Electric assist.  IF it is done well, it does now intrude!  I have an old model silver can Currie USPD on mine which acts as a booster on hills and is INVISIBLE any other time.  It does not drag on the bike, though the battery makes it rather heavy.  Simplicity itself!  But at the same time, It can be converted to pedal only in about 1 minute!  with only a minor weight penalty.  E-assist is a helpful item.  NEARLY as useful as the X itself!

                        Mark
                        aka Papa Balloon


                        Beth



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                        --
                        Family FUN!.....with a twist!

                        Papa Balloon
                      • Fred K. Aron
                        Too Freakin funny...my name is actualy Fred...and it fits...   http://green.yahoo.com/blog/ecogeek/360/50-miles-per-burrito.html Too Freakin funny...my name
                        Message 11 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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                          Too Freakin' funny...my name is actualy Fred...and it fits...
                           



                        • Carl Ray
                          Beth, Thanks for being so honest and candid about your X. I too share so many of your X periences Xcept for the snowy cold stuff and Chronic fatigue. I rode a
                          Message 12 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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                            Beth, 

                            Thanks for being so honest and candid about your X. I too share so many of your X periences Xcept for the snowy cold stuff and Chronic fatigue. I rode a 60 R/T commute to the tune of about 2000 miles before I went e-assist. I have my E system stabilized now and enjoy the Electrified X. It can get me to work and back with a charge during my shift. I live in hilly terrain in a city. I can go to Home Depot carrying a big load w/o using a car.

                            Downside with e-assist is that to go Un-e-assist is a bit of work - but possible and relatively easy if you put it together in the first place. 

                            So to get my un-assist thrills I bought a 80's Puegot Montreal Express beater Mountain bike. Because it has no suspension I might just make that a commuter/touring bike Rivendale style. Future dreams.

                            Back the the X ... another unintended thing that I have experienced is Road racing!
                            Yes Lycra multicolored, Titanium, Carbon fiber $3000 plus Roadies can not get over the way a E-Xtracycle will blow by them! They think I am racing. When in fact I am cruising anywhere between 19 - 23 MPH.  Yes many roadies can do this speed, most do for a while, most do not over great distances. Last weekend I was heading to a store 11 miles away to buy gardening supplies. So I was rolling around 21-23 mph on the River trail as I passed this guy. I said good morning a few moments later he was on me like stink-on-a-June Bug. So for grins I pedaled a bit harder and reached 25, even up to 26 mph for a couple miles, I look back and the Dude was still there so I just maintained my speed and cadence. This guy was like a bad habit, just couldn't shake him. Suddenly he dropped, I had never experienced someone hanging on for so long. I got off at the next street went to the store only to find it not open on Sundays : (

                            Yes I too get caught in the ego crap that Roadies are so often inflicted with. On the return I met another guy riding fully loaded with Touring panniers doing around 12 MPH, we started riding and talking. I had more fun on the way back than I ever did at high speed, going to. My friend has a sticker it reads "Hasten Slowly" On that ride I really got the full meaning of that  term "Hasten Slowly" .

                            So there you are-  e-assist has it's place and is loads of fun. It can really help make an X into a true SubUrban Bicycle (SUB) ready to take on tough hills or escort you on your commute w/o being dead from the ride. For many it can fill that gap, and help them ride more, car less. But yet there are times when just pedaling at a light cadence, meeting interesting and nice people is what it's about. Experiencing a "Hammer Fest" on a X is fun, but I gravitate into the Hasten Slowly mode given the choice. I would love to have two X's. One with assist and one in standard mode to use depending on needs. Ah yes the perfect world....

                            Peace,

                            Carl

                            On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 7:43 AM, beth hamon <periwinklekog@...> wrote:


                            So it's nearly a year since I built up my mid-80's Cycle Pro ATB into an Xtracycle. Here are my findings:

                            1. Worst moment on the X: Riding it home in the snow. Confident that the worst of the epic winter weather was behind us I'd ridden the X to the shop to teach a class. As the sun set, wet snow fell. By the time the class let out there was an inch or so of sloppy, wet snow on the ground. Riding in the newly-fallen stuff was okay, but once I got onto regularly-used streets things got slippy and scary. A five-mile ride took me over an hour and by the time I got home I was sweaty, shaky and miserable.

                            2. Best moment on the X: Riding with a full cargo of lawn chairs, beer and a huge picnic basket to a downtown concert at Waterfront Park last August, and enjoying appreciative stares and smiles from onlookers as I politely rang my bell.

                            3. What continues to be a challenge: The flex factor. Building up an X from a mid-80's ATB frame has increased the flex in the bottom bracket area. It's not exactly dangerous -- and I do check the attachment bolts periodically to make sure nothing's come loose -- but it continues to be an unsettling feeling, heightened whenever I carry a load of more than about 35 lbs.

                            4. The Slug factor: Each time I ride the X I have to remind myself that I have a different relationship with the concept of "speed" on this thing. The X simply goes slower, because I go slower on heavier bikes. So I have to give myself more time to get places on the X than on my single bike. That said, I find that, being somewhat out of shape from a snowy winter of inactivity and a spring full of allergy issues, I am less inclined to ride the X than I'd thought I'd be. There's no taking it on public transit (the wheelbase is too long to flip up into a hook on light rail, and X's are not allowed on TriMet buses at all), so any time I ride it I have to commit to riding the full distance. I have ridden with the X far more in the past year than I used my trailer in five. However, because of additional chronic fatigue factors that come and go, I have ridden the X less often than I would have liked for the investment.

                            All of these factors combined have led to this conclusion:

                            I like the X. I even like it enough to keep it, even though it takes up a lot of room in my tiny, limited storage space. But The frame it's built onto right now makes riding it less pleasant than I would like. Money is ridiculously tight, so swapping parts over to a stiffer Big Dummy frame isn't an option (unless someone out there wants to sell me a used 18" BD frameset...). However, I realize that at some point I will probably have to either add some kind of electric assist, or sell the X and limit my load-carrying to that which will fit in my Bike Buckets.

                            I would prefer not to have to mess with electric assist. It's just another layer of complication for someone who is used to working on her own bikes and keeping things simple. Adding an electric motor will not keep it simple for me. I will start by changing the gearing and seeing if that make enough of a difference for me. But I admit that I'm not enough of an enthusiast to make the X my primary bicycle, and that's something.

                            Beth




                            --
                            Every vision born of earth is fleeting
                            Every vision born of heaven is a blessing
                            For people, the sight of spring warms their hearts
                            For fish, the rhythm of the ocean is a blessing
                            The brilliant sun that shines in every heart.
                            For the heaven's earth and all creatures.
                            What a blessing!...
                            The heart can't wait to speak of this ecstasy.
                            The soul is kissing he earth, saying
                            Oh God, what a blessing...
                            --Rumi
                          • Carl Ray
                            Reminds me of this video comparing the efficiency of Condors and Humans on a bicycle in a Steve Jobs speech. Give this a few seconds for a Library of congress
                            Message 13 of 14 , Apr 29, 2009
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                              Reminds me of this video comparing the efficiency of Condors and Humans on a bicycle in a Steve Jobs speech. Give this a few seconds for a Library of congress into advertisment...

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ob_GX50Za6c 

                              On Wed, Apr 29, 2009 at 9:15 PM, Fred K. Aron <inluvwithsara@...> wrote:


                              Too Freakin' funny...my name is actualy Fred...and it fits...
                               






                              --
                              Every vision born of earth is fleeting
                              Every vision born of heaven is a blessing
                              For people, the sight of spring warms their hearts
                              For fish, the rhythm of the ocean is a blessing
                              The brilliant sun that shines in every heart.
                              For the heaven's earth and all creatures.
                              What a blessing!...
                              The heart can't wait to speak of this ecstasy.
                              The soul is kissing he earth, saying
                              Oh God, what a blessing...
                              --Rumi
                            • beth hamon
                              I am going to start by trying a larger gear cluster in the rear. I think I m just going to have to live with the wobllym flexy feeling, since I cannot afford
                              Message 14 of 14 , Apr 30, 2009
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                                I am going to start by trying a larger gear cluster in the rear.
                                I think I'm just going to have to live with the wobllym flexy feeling, since I cannot afford to make significant changes at this time and when I need a cargo-hauling bike the X does it with more aplomb than just about anything.

                                I have a day filled with X-riding ahead (commuting, errands for the shop) and I'll see how it goes.

                                Thanks for your comments. --Beth
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