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Re: [rootsradicals] newbie pedal change?

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  • David Chase
    ... The end of the wrench needs to be close to the crank axle. That minimizes the torque on the crank. Also, when you reassemble, use some wax (I use beeswax,
    Message 1 of 24 , Apr 1 2:05 PM
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      >
      The end of the wrench needs to be close to the crank axle.
      That minimizes the torque on the crank.

      Also, when you reassemble, use some wax (I use beeswax, probably any
      will do) on the threads. You want them tight, but not so tight that
      you strip the aluminum threads on the crank arm, and the beeswax will
      both lubricate when tightening and prevent accidental loosening later.

      > Yes, I'm remembering that. When I push the wrench towards the rear of
      > the bike the whole crank turns backwards unless I hold it, but then I
      > don't have hands to steady the bike, that's my problem. My husband
      > (and his stronger arms) tried it too and had the same trouble. I feel
      > like we're missing something, or we need to go find a bike stand.
      >
      > Abigail
      >
    • ama3655@aol.com
      Abigail - Position the pedal wrench such that it s roughly aligned with the crank arm. Use the longest wrench you can find. Then when you push on the wrench
      Message 2 of 24 , Apr 1 2:10 PM
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        Abigail -
         
        Position the pedal wrench such that it's roughly aligned with the crank arm. Use the longest wrench you can find. Then when you push on the wrench things will get easier to hold. If the pedals have been over tightened or otherwise stuck in place somehow you might need to give the wrench a sharp rap with a soft hammer. As noted, righty tighty lefty loosy only works on the right side here.
         
        Grease the threads of the new pedals and don't tighten them too tight, the job will be easier next time.
         
        FatRob
         
        In a message dated 4/1/2009 3:32:33 P.M. Central Daylight Time, abigailvr@... writes:
        Hi All,

        I have an Xtracycle built on a step-through Townie and I managed to
        break one of the pedals, so I got some new (metal!) ones and a pedal
        wrench but I'm totally stuck on switching them. The problem is that I
        don't own a repair stand and my bike has a childseat on it, so I
        can't turn it upside down. Is it humanly possible to steady the bike
        and provide enough leverage to remove the pedal while bracing the
        crank so it doesn't turn, or am I doing something wrong?

        Thanks!

        Abigail
        currently bikeless, and sad, in CA.
         


        Worried about job security? Check out the 5 safest jobs in a recession.
      • JJ Ark
        as long as you have the correct pedal direction ( left is reversed,) then I rap the wrench with a rubber mallet, or even a bit of wood. (think from a height of
        Message 3 of 24 , Apr 1 2:18 PM
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          as long as you have the correct pedal direction ( left is reversed,) then I rap the wrench with a rubber mallet, or even a bit of wood. (think from a height of 6" or so) Most likely its jammed in tight (which is good) and just needs a *bit* of shock to knock the threads free. I sometimes use metal to strike it (a 14mm wrench rapping a15mm for example) but that runs the risk of shattering the tools you are using, so be VERY careful doing so. If you still can't get it off, take to the LBS and explain what you are trying to do...they should be able to loosen them for you. Around here it would be free (bing, bing) but perhaps not at your LBS.

          thereexists a corrosion that can happen between dissimilar metals (the name escapes me) so over time you can find some interesting bonding that takes place between pedal threads (steel) and the threads on lightweight aluminum cranks, but that probably isn't the case here.

          Don't forget to use a good grease for the threads on the new pedal threads and tighten well. 

          JJ

          On Apr 1, 2009, at 1:48 PM, Jeff Snavely wrote:

          How about sitting on the bike and using your foot on the right crank to brace. I can't picture how I actually do it. I seem to remember that changing the position of the wrench helps things.





          On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Abigail vR <abigailvr@sbcglobal .net> wrote:

          Yes, I'm remembering that. When I push the wrench towards the rear of 
          the bike the whole crank turns backwards unless I hold it, but then I 
          don't have hands to steady the bike, that's my problem. My husband 
          (and his stronger arms) tried it too and had the same trouble. I feel 
          like we're missing something, or we need to go find a bike stand.

          Abigail



          On Apr 1, 2009, at 1:34 PM, Jeff Snavely wrote:

          > Yes, it should be possible.
          >
          > Are you remembering that the left pedal is reverse threaded? Turn 
          > right to remove.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 4:31 PM, Abigail vR 
          > <abigailvr@sbcglobal .net> wrote:
          > Hi All,
          >
          > I have an Xtracycle built on a step-through Townie and I managed to
          > break one of the pedals, so I got some new (metal!) ones and a pedal
          > wrench but I'm totally stuck on switching them. The problem is that I
          > don't own a repair stand and my bike has a childseat on it, so I
          > can't turn it upside down. Is it humanly possible to steady the bike
          > and provide enough leverage to remove the pedal while bracing the
          > crank so it doesn't turn, or am I doing something wrong?
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
          > Abigail
          > currently bikeless, and sad, in CA.
          >
          >
          >
          > 




          JJ Ark


          Charlie: You know, little girl? You freak me the hell out. On the outside, you're just as pretty as a picture. But on the inside, you're a --
          Cameron: Hyper-alloy combat chassis.
          Charlie: Is that a complicated way of saying 'robot'?
          Cameron: Cybernetic organism. Living tissue over a metal endoskeleton.
          Charlie: Okay. Scary robot.
          --Sarah Connor Chronicles, 2008

        • Abigail vR
          Thanks for all the tips! The key seemed to be laying it down so I could get leverage without having to also balance the bike (I have no bike stand). I used a
          Message 4 of 24 , Apr 1 2:37 PM
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            Thanks for all the tips! The key seemed to be laying it down so I
            could get leverage without having to also balance the bike (I have no
            bike stand). I used a mallet to knock it free and some beeswax on the
            threads of the new pedals.

            Now my Townie-X has fancy metal pedals but I think I did something to
            the derailleur in this process. (Sigh) Off to look for information on
            adjusting that!

            Abigail



            On Apr 1, 2009, at 2:18 PM, JJ Ark wrote:

            > as long as you have the correct pedal direction ( left is
            > reversed,) then I rap the wrench with a rubber mallet, or even a
            > bit of wood. (think from a height of 6" or so) Most likely its
            > jammed in tight (which is good) and just needs a *bit* of shock to
            > knock the threads free. I sometimes use metal to strike it (a 14mm
            > wrench rapping a15mm for example) but that runs the risk of
            > shattering the tools you are using, so be VERY careful doing so. If
            > you still can't get it off, take to the LBS and explain what you
            > are trying to do...they should be able to loosen them for you.
            > Around here it would be free (bing, bing) but perhaps not at your LBS.
            >
            >
            > thereexists a corrosion that can happen between dissimilar metals
            > (the name escapes me) so over time you can find some interesting
            > bonding that takes place between pedal threads (steel) and the
            > threads on lightweight aluminum cranks, but that probably isn't the
            > case here.
            >
            > Don't forget to use a good grease for the threads on the new pedal
            > threads and tighten well.
            >
            > JJ
            >
            > On Apr 1, 2009, at 1:48 PM, Jeff Snavely wrote:
            >
            >> How about sitting on the bike and using your foot on the right
            >> crank to brace. I can't picture how I actually do it. I seem to
            >> remember that changing the position of the wrench helps things.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 4:40 PM, Abigail vR !
            >> <abigailvr@...> wrote:
            >> Yes, I'm remembering that. When I push the wrench towards the rear of
            >> the bike the whole crank turns backwards unless I hold it, but then I
            >> don't have hands to steady the bike, that's my problem. My husband
            >> (and his stronger arms) tried it too and had the same trouble. I feel
            >> like we're missing something, or we need to go find a bike stand.
            >>
            >> Abigail
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> On Apr 1, 2009, at 1:34 PM, Jeff Snavely wrote:
            >>
            >> > Yes, it should be possible.
            >> >
            >> > Are you remembering that the left pedal is reverse threaded? Turn
            >> > right to remove.
            >> >
            >> >
            >> >
            >> >
            >> >
            >> > On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 4:31 PM, Abigail vR
            >> > <abigailvr@...> wrote:
            >> > Hi All,
            >> >
            >> > I have an Xtracycle built on a step-through Townie and I managed to
            >> > break one of the pedals, so I got some new (metal!) ones and a
            >> pedal
            >> > wrench but I'm totally stuck on switching them. The problem is
            >> that I
            >> > don't own a repair stand and my bike has a childseat on it, so I
            >> > can't turn it upside down. Is it humanly possible to steady the
            >> bike
            >> > and provide enough leverage to remove the pedal while bracing the
            >> > crank so it doesn't turn, or am I doing something wrong?
            >> >
            >> > Thanks!
            >> >
            >> > Abigail
            >> > currently! bikeles s, and sad, in CA.
            >> >
            >> >
            >> >
            >> >
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            > JJ Ark
            > jj@...
            >
            >
            > Charlie: You know, little girl? You freak me the hell out. On the
            > outside, you're just as pretty as a picture. But on the inside,
            > you're a --
            > Cameron: Hyper-alloy combat chassis.
            > Charlie: Is that a complicated way of saying 'robot'?
            > Cameron: Cybernetic organism. Living tissue over a metal endoskeleton.
            > Charlie: Okay. Scary robot.
            > --Sarah Connor Chronicles, 2008
            >
            >
            >
          • Mark Garvey
            I do not use a bike stand or turn the bike upside down anyway usually. Put the pedal wrench on the flats so that it is a few degrees off from the crank arm,
            Message 5 of 24 , Apr 1 2:44 PM
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              I do not use a bike stand or turn the bike upside down anyway usually.  Put the pedal wrench on the flats so that  it is a few degrees off from the crank arm, like 10-15 degrees.  then put your hand around the two and SQUEEZE them together so that the pedal (remember WHICH say the pedal is threaded now!)  and once you break it free, you should be able to spin it off easily.  I use a Box/open wrench in the proper size (don't ask me what it IS, because I don't remember) and it seems to work just fine!

              Papa Mark

              On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 3:31 PM, Abigail vR <abigailvr@...> wrote:
              Hi All,

              I have an Xtracycle built on a step-through Townie and I managed to
              break one of the pedals, so I got some new (metal!) ones and a pedal
              wrench but I'm totally stuck on switching them. The problem is that I
              don't own a repair stand and my bike has a childseat on it, so I
              can't turn it upside down. Is it humanly possible to steady the bike
              and provide enough leverage to remove the pedal while bracing the
              crank so it doesn't turn, or am I doing something wrong?

              Thanks!

              Abigail
              currently bikeless, and sad, in CA.


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              --
              "I just like to blow things up!"

              Papa Balloon
            • JJ Ark
              15mm on most pedals. I had a kids pair that were 14 once... maybe a bike shop worker has other input? jj ... JJ Ark jj@scooternut.com We used to say if a frog
              Message 6 of 24 , Apr 1 2:47 PM
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                15mm on most pedals. I had a kids pair that were 14 once...

                maybe a bike shop worker has other input?

                jj
                On Apr 1, 2009, at 2:44 PM, Mark Garvey wrote:

                I do not use a bike stand or turn the bike upside down anyway usually.  Put the pedal wrench on the flats so that  it is a few degrees off from the crank arm, like 10-15 degrees.  then put your hand around the two and SQUEEZE them together so that the pedal (remember WHICH say the pedal is threaded now!)  and once you break it free, you should be able to spin it off easily.  I use a Box/open wrench in the proper size (don't ask me what it IS, because I don't remember) and it seems to work just fine!

                Papa Mark

                On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 3:31 PM, Abigail vR <abigailvr@sbcglobal .net> wrote:
                Hi All,

                I have an Xtracycle built on a step-through Townie and I managed to
                break one of the pedals, so I got some new (metal!) ones and a pedal
                wrench but I'm totally stuck on switching them. The problem is that I
                don't own a repair stand and my bike has a childseat on it, so I
                can't turn it upside down. Is it humanly possible to steady the bike
                and provide enough leverage to remove the pedal while bracing the
                crank so it doesn't turn, or am I doing something wrong?

                Thanks!

                Abigail
                currently bikeless, and sad, in CA.


                ------------ --------- --------- ------

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                To Post a message, send it to:          rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com


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                -- 
                "I just like to blow things up!"

                Papa Balloon


                JJ Ark

                "We used to say if a frog had side pockets, he'd carry a handgun." - Dan Rather, Election Night, 2004

              • Andrew Kreps
                ... Sheldon Brown is my one-stop shop for that type of information. If you start there, your understanding should grow measurably.
                Message 7 of 24 , Apr 1 2:58 PM
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                  On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 2:37 PM, Abigail vR <abigailvr@...> wrote:

                  Now my Townie-X has fancy metal pedals but I think I did something to
                  the derailleur in this process. (Sigh) Off to look for information on
                  adjusting that!

                  Abigail


                  Sheldon Brown is my one-stop shop for that type of information.  If you start there, your understanding should grow measurably.


                   
                • JJ Ark
                  AASHTA http://www.flickr.com/photos/wesh/2483825173/ JJ ... JJ Ark jj@scooternut.com He s got a TOWEL! --Vogon, THGTTG, 2005
                  Message 8 of 24 , Apr 1 3:18 PM
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                    AASHTA


                    JJ

                    On Apr 1, 2009, at 2:58 PM, Andrew Kreps wrote:


                    On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 2:37 PM, Abigail vR <abigailvr@sbcglobal .net> wrote:

                    Now my Townie-X has fancy metal pedals but I think I did something to
                    the derailleur in this process. (Sigh) Off to look for information on
                    adjusting that!

                    Abigail


                    Sheldon Brown is my one-stop shop for that type of information.  If you start there, your understanding should grow measurably.


                     


                    JJ Ark

                    "He's got a TOWEL! "  --Vogon, THGTTG, 2005

                  • ama3655@aol.com
                    In a message dated 4/1/2009 4:19:05 P.M. Central Daylight Time, jj@scooternut.com writes: thereexists a corrosion that can happen between dissimilar metals
                    Message 9 of 24 , Apr 1 3:50 PM
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                      In a message dated 4/1/2009 4:19:05 P.M. Central Daylight Time, jj@... writes:
                      thereexists a corrosion that can happen between dissimilar metals (the name escapes me
                      That would be galvanic corrosion. Interesting stuff, can really eat your lunch if you aren't careful. That's what typically welds aluminum seatposts or stems into old steel frames. It's not really permanent, someday the whole bike will corrode away into it's more basic elements.
                      FatRob


                      Worried about job security? Check out the 5 safest jobs in a recession.
                    • ama3655@aol.com
                      In a message dated 4/1/2009 5:19:34 P.M. Central Daylight Time, jj@scooternut.com writes: AASHTA _http://www.flickr.http://www.http://www.flick_
                      Message 10 of 24 , Apr 1 3:51 PM
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                        In a message dated 4/1/2009 5:19:34 P.M. Central Daylight Time, jj@... writes:

                        AASHTA



                        JJ
                        Awesome guy, and a neat sticker. I'd love to score a few of them.
                        FatRob


                        Worried about job security? Check out the 5 safest jobs in a recession.
                      • Andrew Kreps
                        ... I found an address for them, right here in Portland: http://www.bikepunk.com/ You know what I know.
                        Message 11 of 24 , Apr 1 3:59 PM
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                          On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 3:51 PM, <ama3655@...> wrote:
                          Awesome guy, and a neat sticker. I'd love to score a few of them.
                          FatRob


                          I found an address for them, right here in Portland:


                          You know what I know.

                           

                        • ama3655@aol.com
                          In a message dated 4/1/2009 6:00:07 P.M. Central Daylight Time, andrew.kreps@gmail.com writes: I found an address for them, right here in Portland:
                          Message 12 of 24 , Apr 1 4:10 PM
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                            In a message dated 4/1/2009 6:00:07 P.M. Central Daylight Time, andrew.kreps@... writes:
                            I found an address for them, right here in Portland:


                            You know what I know.
                            Thanks! I sent them an email, we'll see what happens. Maybe I need to visit Portland to pick them up...that's a lot of peanut butter sandwiches from Alabama.
                            FatRob


                            Worried about job security? Check out the 5 safest jobs in a recession.
                          • Tone
                            Abigail, I realize you already got your pedals off. That is great! I also think it is awesome that so many of our friendly RootsRadical community quickly
                            Message 13 of 24 , Apr 1 5:30 PM
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                              Abigail,

                                          I realize you already got your pedals off. That is great! I also think it is awesome that so many of our friendly RootsRadical community quickly stepped up to offer a LOT of terrific advice to help you out.

                                          While, I am not personally familiar with using bees wax to “lube” up pedal threads before attaching them, I can not see why it would not be effective. I have always understood the use of some basic axle grease or something similar (but not just chain lubricant or whatever), smeared lightly around threading (of pedals and other parts) is good to keep the connecting parts from bonding over time.

                                          I also do not use a repair stand, when getting pedals off. Generally I use a good pedal wrench (Pedro’s in my case) and I offset the wrench from the crank arm by a few degrees and squeeze together, which is what a couple of people already suggested. However…

                               

                              And everyone,

                                          …There are a couple of other tricks I found to be effective when you really have to put-the-hurt-on your pedals to get them off, and no one seemed to bring it up so I will share them with everyone.

                                          When your pedals are super bonded and nothing seems to be working, which was the case with me a few times back when I was messengering in all weather conditions, I figured some things out. First off, try spraying the pedal threading areas with a generous soaking of WD40. Wipe the area clean as much as possible, then spray it all over again with another healthy dose of WD40. After you spray a second time, let the WD40 soak in for a couple of hours, then try your luck at detaching the pedal.

                                          If that does not work, then move on to the ultimate pedal removing tactic I have in my arsenal. Back when I was a messenger, I usually carried 2” wide double-sided industrial Velcro straps, which I used as cargo tie-downs. Well, I found that if I used a strap or two to tightly wrap one crank-arm into a fixed position alongside one of the chain-stays, then that would naturally keep the crank arm on the other side of the bike in a solid orientation pointing forward. With that being the case, you can attach your pedal wrench to the forward-pointing pedal, then with both tires firmly on the ground, you can actually step or even stomp down on the handle of your pedal wrench while holding the bike firmly in place. Just MAKE SURE you are stomping down in the direction of the pedal’s threading!!!! Once I had to bounce up a down a few times with all my weight on the pedal wrench to free up a pedal! If that tactic does not work, then I think the only alternative would be to either sacrifice your crank arms or drill out your pedals. Those would have to be some major STUCK pedals though! J

                               

                                          Ride safe everyone… and try not to hurt yourselves TOO MUCH when removing your old pedals…

                              _TONE_

                            • David Chase
                              ... I got it from my dad, years ago. I found out, years later, that it is regarded as a super lubricant for threading in the same class as moly disulfide,
                              Message 14 of 24 , Apr 1 6:02 PM
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                                On 2009-04-01, at 8:30 PM, Tone wrote:
                                > While, I am not personally familiar with using bees wax
                                > to “lube” up pedal threads before attaching them, I can not see why
                                > it would not be effective. I have always understood the use of some
                                > basic axle grease or something similar (but not just chain lubricant
                                > or whatever), smeared lightly around threading (of pedals and other
                                > parts) is good to keep the connecting parts from bonding over time.

                                I got it from my dad, years ago. I found out, years later, that it is
                                regarded as a "super lubricant" for threading in the same class as
                                moly disulfide, and that if you use it, you're supposed to derate
                                torque settings by something like 10% (can't find the original
                                reference for that number). It melts under torque, but is solid at
                                reasonable temperatures, so it holds the threads and keeps moisture out.

                                The main reason I use it is that it stops things from rattling loose.
                                I did once come upon someone on the local bike path, who, on her shiny
                                new bike with greased pedal threads, had one pedal fall off, and the
                                other half unscrewed. Falling off like that tears out the last little
                                bit of threads, and it was not fun getting it back together.

                                David
                              • Carl Ray
                                http://bicycletutor.com/replace-pedals/ Great video Tutorial - Left pedal has reverse thread! Carl ... -- Carl http://xtracycle.blogspot.com Our planes and
                                Message 15 of 24 , Apr 1 7:34 PM
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                                  http://bicycletutor.com/replace-pedals/


                                  Great  video Tutorial - Left pedal has reverse thread!

                                  Carl

                                  On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 1:31 PM, Abigail vR <abigailvr@...> wrote:

                                  Hi All,

                                  I have an Xtracycle built on a step-through Townie and I managed to
                                  break one of the pedals, so I got some new (metal!) ones and a pedal
                                  wrench but I'm totally stuck on switching them. The problem is that I
                                  don't own a repair stand and my bike has a childseat on it, so I
                                  can't turn it upside down. Is it humanly possible to steady the bike
                                  and provide enough leverage to remove the pedal while bracing the
                                  crank so it doesn't turn, or am I doing something wrong?

                                  Thanks!

                                  Abigail
                                  currently bikeless, and sad, in CA.




                                  --
                                  Carl

                                  http://xtracycle.blogspot.com

                                  "Our planes and automobiles have made it possible for us to go anywhere and see nothing, but our simpler, slower means of conveyance, our feet and our bicycles and wind-powered boats, still connect us to this earth that is not ours to master, but to treasure."

                                  Kent Peterson
                                  http://kentsbike.blogspot.com/



                                • Fred K. Aron
                                  Other than the obvious, riding it, what methods have y all found for mounting your Xtracycle/BigDummy to your car? I know there is a roof rack made by
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Apr 1 8:43 PM
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                                    Other than the obvious, riding it, what methods have y'all found for mounting your Xtracycle/BigDummy to your car?
                                    I know there is a roof rack made by Rocky Mounts that works...any other options?
                                    Fred
                                     

                                    We who are always ready when zombies finally come.



                                    From: Carl Ray <kwikfile@...>
                                    To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Wednesday, April 1, 2009 10:34:02 PM
                                    Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] newbie pedal change?

                                    http://bicycletutor.com/replace-pedals/



                                    Great  video Tutorial - Left pedal has reverse thread!

                                    Carl

                                    On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 1:31 PM, Abigail vR <abigailvr@sbcglobal .net> wrote:

                                    Hi All,

                                    I have an Xtracycle built on a step-through Townie and I managed to
                                    break one of the pedals, so I got some new (metal!) ones and a pedal
                                    wrench but I'm totally stuck on switching them. The problem is that I
                                    don't own a repair stand and my bike has a childseat on it, so I
                                    can't turn it upside down. Is it humanly possible to steady the bike
                                    and provide enough leverage to remove the pedal while bracing the
                                    crank so it doesn't turn, or am I doing something wrong?

                                    Thanks!

                                    Abigail
                                    currently bikeless, and sad, in CA.




                                    --
                                    Carl

                                    http://xtracycle. blogspot. com

                                    "Our planes and automobiles have made it possible for us to go anywhere and see nothing, but our simpler, slower means of conveyance, our feet and our bicycles and wind-powered boats, still connect us to this earth that is not ours to master, but to treasure."

                                    Kent Peterson
                                    http://kentsbike. blogspot. com/




                                  • Carl Ray
                                    Dude, I have a Honda Element - I fold up the rear two seats, scooch up the front seat, and put her in the back sans the front tire. Since I went e-assist - I
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Apr 1 9:08 PM
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                                      Dude,

                                      I have a Honda Element - I fold up the rear two seats, scooch up the front seat, and put her in the back sans the front tire. Since I went e-assist - I have not done that because the front tire is put on via nuts not quick release.  More of a pain in the butt...

                                      Carl

                                      On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 8:43 PM, Fred K. Aron <inluvwithsara@...> wrote:

                                      Other than the obvious, riding it, what methods have y'all found for mounting your Xtracycle/BigDummy to your car?
                                      I know there is a roof rack made by Rocky Mounts that works...any other options?
                                      Fred
                                       

                                      We who are always ready when zombies finally come.



                                      From: Carl Ray <kwikfile@...>
                                      To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Wednesday, April 1, 2009 10:34:02 PM
                                      Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] newbie pedal change?

                                      http://bicycletutor.com/replace-pedals/



                                      Great  video Tutorial - Left pedal has reverse thread!

                                      Carl

                                      On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 1:31 PM, Abigail vR <abigailvr@sbcglobal .net> wrote:

                                      Hi All,

                                      I have an Xtracycle built on a step-through Townie and I managed to
                                      break one of the pedals, so I got some new (metal!) ones and a pedal
                                      wrench but I'm totally stuck on switching them. The problem is that I
                                      don't own a repair stand and my bike has a childseat on it, so I
                                      can't turn it upside down. Is it humanly possible to steady the bike
                                      and provide enough leverage to remove the pedal while bracing the
                                      crank so it doesn't turn, or am I doing something wrong?

                                      Thanks!

                                      Abigail
                                      currently bikeless, and sad, in CA.




                                      --
                                      Carl

                                      http://xtracycle. blogspot. com

                                      "Our planes and automobiles have made it possible for us to go anywhere and see nothing, but our simpler, slower means of conveyance, our feet and our bicycles and wind-powered boats, still connect us to this earth that is not ours to master, but to treasure."

                                      Kent Peterson
                                      http://kentsbike. blogspot. com/







                                      --
                                      Carl

                                      http://xtracycle.blogspot.com

                                      "Our planes and automobiles have made it possible for us to go anywhere and see nothing, but our simpler, slower means of conveyance, our feet and our bicycles and wind-powered boats, still connect us to this earth that is not ours to master, but to treasure."

                                      Kent Peterson
                                      http://kentsbike.blogspot.com/



                                    • Andrew Kreps
                                      ... I went through this process a couple of weeks ago, and the Xtracycle specific Rocky Mounts rack is the only one I found that costs less than $300. There
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Apr 2 10:25 AM
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                                        On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 8:43 PM, Fred K. Aron <inluvwithsara@...> wrote:
                                        Other than the obvious, riding it, what methods have y'all found for mounting your Xtracycle/BigDummy to your car?
                                        I know there is a roof rack made by Rocky Mounts that works...any other options?
                                        Fred

                                        I went through this process a couple of weeks ago, and the Xtracycle specific Rocky Mounts rack is the only one I found that costs less than $300.  There are some tandem-specific carriers (read: overbuilt) that will work, and one Xtra-specific trailer hitch mount that costs in excess of $700.  

                                        The Rocky Mountain is solid and stable, and while the sheet metal flexes a bit under the weight, it will hold.  I have a disc brake caliper on the front that touched the side of the channel, but since it is made out of sheet metal, it gave enough to let the fork seat properly.  My rear tire was a 2.3" knobby which just barely entered the channel in the rear, so I threw a strap over the top tube of the bike to make sure it didn't move.   I carried my Big Dummy about 500 miles round trip last weekend through rain, wind, sleet and snow, and it never budged.  I drive a sedan, so getting the bike on top of the car wasn't too difficult.  If you have a higher roof line, you'd be wise to enlist some help.  

                                        Your standard bike rack, be it roof or hitch mount, just isn't going to work.  You may be able to rig up something custom with a fork mount and a cargo platform (hitch-mount or pickup bed), but be aware that unless you drive vehicle designed by AM General, your bicycle is probably wider than your car.


                                      • Carl Ray
                                        About roof rack mounting - I did it buy cutting my Yakima Steel head in half sliding the two halves apart and filling the gap by connecting a piece of square
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Apr 2 8:11 PM
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                                          About roof rack mounting - I did it buy cutting my Yakima Steel head in half sliding the two halves apart and filling the gap by connecting a piece of square aluminum tubing. Using the channel and screw/bolt head system that was originally there you can still get the rigid strength and extension to hold an X or BDummy. I did not use this much because my car is tall-ish an Honda Element. Lifting and strapping the bike down was a pain for me. It is a doable and cheap solution. But really think and plan where you want to cut your rail. A Yakima Steel head is some $$ if you screw up the cut. The bright side is that it does cut by hand fairly easy. If your existing system , car and your height is right , I say go for it!

                                          Carl

                                          On Thu, Apr 2, 2009 at 10:25 AM, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@...> wrote:

                                          On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 8:43 PM, Fred K. Aron <inluvwithsara@...> wrote:
                                          Other than the obvious, riding it, what methods have y'all found for mounting your Xtracycle/BigDummy to your car?
                                          I know there is a roof rack made by Rocky Mounts that works...any other options?
                                          Fred

                                          I went through this process a couple of weeks ago, and the Xtracycle specific Rocky Mounts rack is the only one I found that costs less than $300.  There are some tandem-specific carriers (read: overbuilt) that will work, and one Xtra-specific trailer hitch mount that costs in excess of $700.  

                                          The Rocky Mountain is solid and stable, and while the sheet metal flexes a bit under the weight, it will hold.  I have a disc brake caliper on the front that touched the side of the channel, but since it is made out of sheet metal, it gave enough to let the fork seat properly.  My rear tire was a 2.3" knobby which just barely entered the channel in the rear, so I threw a strap over the top tube of the bike to make sure it didn't move.   I carried my Big Dummy about 500 miles round trip last weekend through rain, wind, sleet and snow, and it never budged.  I drive a sedan, so getting the bike on top of the car wasn't too difficult.  If you have a higher roof line, you'd be wise to enlist some help.  

                                          Your standard bike rack, be it roof or hitch mount, just isn't going to work.  You may be able to rig up something custom with a fork mount and a cargo platform (hitch-mount or pickup bed), but be aware that unless you drive vehicle designed by AM General, your bicycle is probably wider than your car.





                                          --
                                          Carl

                                          http://xtracycle.blogspot.com

                                          "Our planes and automobiles have made it possible for us to go anywhere and see nothing, but our simpler, slower means of conveyance, our feet and our bicycles and wind-powered boats, still connect us to this earth that is not ours to master, but to treasure."

                                          Kent Peterson
                                          http://kentsbike.blogspot.com/



                                        • Carl Ray
                                          To make a bit more sense I will post pics. But you will need two drill holes in the square piece and buy a few bolts, nuts and washers to be able to do the
                                          Message 20 of 24 , Apr 2 8:16 PM
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                                            To make a bit more sense I will post pics. But you will need two drill holes in the square piece and buy a few bolts, nuts and washers to be able to do the extension thing similar to how it was originally. I stared at my original set up for a while before I cut and drilled. I still could have done better, but it works. a second "top' square rail would be even stronger for rigidness.

                                            Carl

                                            On Thu, Apr 2, 2009 at 8:11 PM, Carl Ray <kwikfile@...> wrote:
                                            About roof rack mounting - I did it buy cutting my Yakima Steel head in half sliding the two halves apart and filling the gap by connecting a piece of square aluminum tubing. Using the channel and screw/bolt head system that was originally there you can still get the rigid strength and extension to hold an X or BDummy. I did not use this much because my car is tall-ish an Honda Element. Lifting and strapping the bike down was a pain for me. It is a doable and cheap solution. But really think and plan where you want to cut your rail. A Yakima Steel head is some $$ if you screw up the cut. The bright side is that it does cut by hand fairly easy. If your existing system , car and your height is right , I say go for it!

                                            Carl


                                            On Thu, Apr 2, 2009 at 10:25 AM, Andrew Kreps <andrew.kreps@...> wrote:

                                            On Wed, Apr 1, 2009 at 8:43 PM, Fred K. Aron <inluvwithsara@...> wrote:
                                            Other than the obvious, riding it, what methods have y'all found for mounting your Xtracycle/BigDummy to your car?
                                            I know there is a roof rack made by Rocky Mounts that works...any other options?
                                            Fred

                                            I went through this process a couple of weeks ago, and the Xtracycle specific Rocky Mounts rack is the only one I found that costs less than $300.  There are some tandem-specific carriers (read: overbuilt) that will work, and one Xtra-specific trailer hitch mount that costs in excess of $700.  

                                            The Rocky Mountain is solid and stable, and while the sheet metal flexes a bit under the weight, it will hold.  I have a disc brake caliper on the front that touched the side of the channel, but since it is made out of sheet metal, it gave enough to let the fork seat properly.  My rear tire was a 2.3" knobby which just barely entered the channel in the rear, so I threw a strap over the top tube of the bike to make sure it didn't move.   I carried my Big Dummy about 500 miles round trip last weekend through rain, wind, sleet and snow, and it never budged.  I drive a sedan, so getting the bike on top of the car wasn't too difficult.  If you have a higher roof line, you'd be wise to enlist some help.  

                                            Your standard bike rack, be it roof or hitch mount, just isn't going to work.  You may be able to rig up something custom with a fork mount and a cargo platform (hitch-mount or pickup bed), but be aware that unless you drive vehicle designed by AM General, your bicycle is probably wider than your car.





                                            --
                                            Carl

                                            http://xtracycle.blogspot.com

                                            "Our planes and automobiles have made it possible for us to go anywhere and see nothing, but our simpler, slower means of conveyance, our feet and our bicycles and wind-powered boats, still connect us to this earth that is not ours to master, but to treasure."

                                            Kent Peterson
                                            http://kentsbike.blogspot.com/






                                            --
                                            Carl

                                            http://xtracycle.blogspot.com

                                            "Our planes and automobiles have made it possible for us to go anywhere and see nothing, but our simpler, slower means of conveyance, our feet and our bicycles and wind-powered boats, still connect us to this earth that is not ours to master, but to treasure."

                                            Kent Peterson
                                            http://kentsbike.blogspot.com/



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