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Bicygnals

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  • wildehandyman01
    Hello all, I stumbled across this :http://www.bicygnalsonline.com/indicators.php I think I would like one,unfortunately, apparently they can not be purchased
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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      Hello all,
      I stumbled across this :http://www.bicygnalsonline.com/indicators.php
      I think I would like one,unfortunately, apparently they can not be purchased in the U.S. I don't know why that is.
      I am not sure whether the signal lights are far enough outboard to be worthwhile.
      I was wondering what other folks thought about it.
      Blessings,
      John
    • Travers, Neil
      I think they look awful, but... The USA restriction could be because of 2.4 Ghz WIREFREE INDICTORS - I don t know what the radio spectrum laws are like in US
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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        I think they look awful, but...

        The USA restriction could be because of "2.4 Ghz WIREFREE INDICTORS" - I
        don't know what the radio spectrum laws are like in US - is this a
        license free band?



        -----Original Message-----
        From: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of wildehandyman01
        Sent: 05 March 2009 16:26
        To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [rootsradicals] Bicygnals


        Hello all,
        I stumbled across this :http://www.bicygnalsonline.com/indicators.php
        I think I would like one,unfortunately, apparently they can not be
        purchased in the U.S. I don't know why that is. I am not sure whether
        the signal lights are far enough outboard to be worthwhile. I was
        wondering what other folks thought about it. Blessings,
        John



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      • Andrew Kreps
        On Thu, Mar 5, 2009 at 8:35 AM, Travers, Neil ... I think the 2.4 ghz band is license free. It s what a lot of modern cordless phones and Wifi devices use.
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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          On Thu, Mar 5, 2009 at 8:35 AM, Travers, Neil
          <Neil.Travers@...> wrote:
          > I think they look awful, but...
          >
          > The USA restriction could be because of "2.4 Ghz WIREFREE INDICTORS" - I
          > don't know what the radio spectrum laws are like in US - is this a
          > license free band?


          I think the 2.4 ghz band is license free. It's what a lot of modern
          cordless phones and Wifi devices use. My best guess is that they're
          either afraid of the liability in the event that the signal doesn't
          have the intended effect, or perhaps there's a potential for patent
          infringement.

          I like the thought of that unit, but I can see that it won't work on
          anything but a set of flat bars. Given that I have a set of 'pleasant
          revolution' cruiser bars, the shape of the unit won't do me any good.

          I've been giving turn signals (and functional brake lights) a lot of
          thought given the amount of street time I spend on my bicycle. My
          current thought is to modify some existing motorcycle technology for
          bicycle use. This makes sense to me since not only am I a motorcycle
          rider, but there are widely available parts in junkyards across the
          world that are ripe for the picking. These parts have been engineered
          and tested, and I also like the design of the switch. It can be
          operated without looking at it.

          I still need to figure out exactly how to mount the units, and, well,
          develop some kind of idea about electrical engineering. :)

          The other thing I've been thinking about is developing a universal
          power pack for my big dummy. I have lights that require 5.5v, 3v and
          14v, a horn that draws 12v, and the motorcycle system would also
          require 12v. If I can just have one battery on the bike to charge
          that runs all of the above, I'd be a very happy camper.
        • Ben Rosenthal
          The one retailer I ve found that will sell and ship them to the U.S. at reasonable prices is Chain Reaction Cycles.
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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            The one retailer I've found that will sell and ship them to the U.S.
            at reasonable prices is Chain Reaction Cycles.
            <http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=24895>

            - Ben
            Alive (and Pedaling) to Save the Planet

            On 5 Mar 2009, at 11:26, wildehandyman01 wrote:

            > I stumbled across this :http://www.bicygnalsonline.com/indicators.php
            > I think I would like one,unfortunately, apparently they can not be
            > purchased in the U.S. I don't know why that is.
          • David Chase
            ... It might not be a practical suggestion, but you could toss all the lights that you ve got, buy some power LEDs, some aluminum flat-bar stock, some epoxy,
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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              On 2009-03-05, at 2:18 PM, Andrew Kreps wrote:
              >
              > I still need to figure out exactly how to mount the units, and, well,
              > develop some kind of idea about electrical engineering. :)
              >
              > The other thing I've been thinking about is developing a universal
              > power pack for my big dummy. I have lights that require 5.5v, 3v and
              > 14v, a horn that draws 12v, and the motorcycle system would also
              > require 12v. If I can just have one battery on the bike to charge
              > that runs all of the above, I'd be a very happy camper.
              >

              It might not be a practical suggestion, but you could toss all the
              lights that you've got, buy some power LEDs, some aluminum flat-bar
              stock, some epoxy, and a BuckPuck (power LED regulator), and have a
              light party.

              I can't quite get excited about signals -- for me, that is just one
              more thing to remember, and I know the hand signals, and I wouldn't
              trust the cars to pay attention anyhow. So instead, I go for
              PLENTY=ENOUGH.

              David
            • murray
              I think the biggest potentail problem with these is not in the design itself. As David said, no one expects turn signals on a bike so won t be paying any
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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                I think the biggest potentail problem with these is not in the design
                itself. As David said, no one expects turn signals on a bike so won't
                be paying any attention to them anyway. I find even using full-arm
                signals often go unnoticed because so few cyclists use them. With all
                the 'blinky' lights already in use on bikes out there I doubt anyone
                would even notice these.

                On 06/03/2009, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
                >
                > On 2009-03-05, at 2:18 PM, Andrew Kreps wrote:
                >>
                >> I still need to figure out exactly how to mount the units, and, well,
                >> develop some kind of idea about electrical engineering. :)
                >>
                >> The other thing I've been thinking about is developing a universal
                >> power pack for my big dummy. I have lights that require 5.5v, 3v and
                >> 14v, a horn that draws 12v, and the motorcycle system would also
                >> require 12v. If I can just have one battery on the bike to charge
                >> that runs all of the above, I'd be a very happy camper.
                >>
                >
                > It might not be a practical suggestion, but you could toss all the
                > lights that you've got, buy some power LEDs, some aluminum flat-bar
                > stock, some epoxy, and a BuckPuck (power LED regulator), and have a
                > light party.
                >
                > I can't quite get excited about signals -- for me, that is just one
                > more thing to remember, and I know the hand signals, and I wouldn't
                > trust the cars to pay attention anyhow. So instead, I go for
                > PLENTY=ENOUGH.
                >
                > David
                >
                >
              • adventureboyseven
                ... I also feel signals are overkill. My plan is to hack a red rear flasher and mount the LEDs on the top of a flag and run the wires down the mast to a
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > On 2009-03-05, at 2:18 PM, Andrew Kreps wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I still need to figure out exactly how to mount the units, and, well,
                  > > develop some kind of idea about electrical engineering. :)
                  > >
                  > > The other thing I've been thinking about is developing a universal
                  > > power pack for my big dummy. I have lights that require 5.5v, 3v and
                  > > 14v, a horn that draws 12v, and the motorcycle system would also
                  > > require 12v. If I can just have one battery on the bike to charge
                  > > that runs all of the above, I'd be a very happy camper.
                  > >
                  >
                  > It might not be a practical suggestion, but you could toss all the
                  > lights that you've got, buy some power LEDs, some aluminum flat-bar
                  > stock, some epoxy, and a BuckPuck (power LED regulator), and have a
                  > light party.
                  >
                  > I can't quite get excited about signals -- for me, that is just one
                  > more thing to remember, and I know the hand signals, and I wouldn't
                  > trust the cars to pay attention anyhow. So instead, I go for
                  > PLENTY=ENOUGH.
                  >
                  > David
                  >
                  I also feel signals are overkill. My plan is to hack a red rear flasher and mount the LEDs on the top of a flag and run the wires down the mast to a custom battery pack at the flags base. If they know you are there that is enough.

                  When I ride I pretend that all the car drivers are trying to kill me, and that way nothing surprises me, and therefore I am safe to a larger degree.

                  Motorcyclists get creamed by cars and trucks all the time and they have full lights, think about it.

                  regards, Phil
                • David Chase
                  ... I think about it quite a bit. My cousin was killed in a motorcycle accident, and my wife, stopped at a stoplight in a Toyota Camry, was rear-ended by
                  Message 8 of 9 , Mar 5, 2009
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                    On 2009-03-05, at 10:52 PM, adventureboyseven wrote:
                    > My plan is to hack a red rear flasher and mount the LEDs on the top
                    > of a flag and run the wires down the mast to a custom battery pack
                    > at the flags base. If they know you are there that is enough.
                    >
                    > When I ride I pretend that all the car drivers are trying to kill
                    > me, and that way nothing surprises me, and therefore I am safe to a
                    > larger degree.
                    >
                    > Motorcyclists get creamed by cars and trucks all the time and they
                    > have full lights, think about it.
                    >
                    I think about it quite a bit. My cousin was killed in a motorcycle
                    accident, and my wife, stopped at a stoplight in a Toyota Camry, was
                    rear-ended by someone who was too busy to notice the red light and
                    stopped car.

                    At one of the electronics sites that I sometimes visit (Sparkfun.com),
                    I did in fact look at the "proximity detectors", to see if there was
                    anything that could pick up a car at a sensible distance, and trigger
                    some serious lights.

                    I rode home tonight in actual dark, using the hub powered lights, with
                    the excess-power-shunt shunting spare power into an LED puck capable
                    of dumping as much as 9 watts. Because of the cold weather and the
                    heat-sinking, the dump LED flashes (*), erratically, but faster as I
                    go faster. It was un-be-lievably obnoxious -- it was a nearly
                    pessimal combination of annoying rate, annoyingly unpatterned, and
                    bright. It is so awful, I cannot really us it anywhere on the bike.

                    (*) The reason for the flashing is an electrical-thermal oscillation.
                    Cold LEDs require a higher voltage before they will conduct/light up.
                    So, the voltage goes a little higher than normal before the light
                    comes on. But as soon as it comes on, it heats up the LED locally,
                    and reduces the voltages needed to run the LED, so it can stay on as
                    the voltage drops (for a bit), until the shunt turns off. And then,
                    because it is mounted to a heat sink in a 10-15mph freezing-
                    temperature wind, it cools off fast, faster than the voltage to turn
                    it on again can build up, till it sits at a plenty-cold temperature,
                    the voltage builds enough, and it starts over again.
                  • David Dannenberg
                    There are lighting kits for motorcycles designed to make off road only bike street legal (after registration of course.) You might look into these. Dave
                    Message 9 of 9 , Mar 6, 2009
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                      There are lighting kits for motorcycles designed to make off road only
                      bike street legal (after registration of course.) You might look into
                      these.


                      Dave
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