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Which side?

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  • John W
    Ok, I ve got my long-loader and the wide-loaders and I want to carry my kayak (13 ft. long, 2 wide and 8 inches thick). I am wondering what side of the
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Ok, I've got my long-loader and the wide-loaders and I want to carry
      my kayak (13 ft. long, 2 wide and 8 inches thick). I am wondering
      what side of the bicycle would be best to carry the kayak on (the way
      to the beach includes some roads with traffic and parked cars if that
      makes a difference). Your thoughts appreciated (we drive on the right
      side of the road where I live).

      Aloha, - John
    • Ian Hoffman
      I would figure that the left side would be better. Less likely to run the front end of the Kayak into something. And if you don t have a center stand, easier
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2009
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        I would figure that the left side would be better. Less likely to run the front end of the Kayak into something. And if you don't have a center stand, easier to load with the weight on the kickstand side of the bike.


        -- Ian

        On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 4:09 PM, John W <john.p.wendell@...> wrote:

        Ok, I've got my long-loader and the wide-loaders and I want to carry
        my kayak (13 ft. long, 2 wide and 8 inches thick). I am wondering
        what side of the bicycle would be best to carry the kayak on (the way
        to the beach includes some roads with traffic and parked cars if that
        makes a difference). Your thoughts appreciated (we drive on the right
        side of the road where I live).

        Aloha, - John


      • Tone
        John, Ian is right on. Having the kayak on the left side (non-drive-chain side) is much better in your case. Besides having the kickstand on that side (if you
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 1, 2009
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          John,

                      Ian is right on. Having the kayak on the left side (non-drive-chain side) is much better in your case. Besides having the kickstand on that side (if you do not have a Kick-Back of course), which makes it easier for loading, with the kayak on the left side driver’s can not help but notice the unusual size of your load. Where as, if you had the kayak on the right side driver’s might not immediately notice it or they might not be able to tell exactly what it is and exactly how much space it takes and how much space you might need for maneuvering since you and your bike might obscure their view of the kayak. Also, while drivers actively moving in cars are expected to be attentive, any drivers exiting a parking space, passengers opening car doors, or pedestrians walking into the street may certainly not see or expect a kayak “floating” by at a height they normally do not take into immediate consideration.

           

                      In my own experience, there was a time when I was moving practically all my then-girlfriend-now-wife’s stuff from her apartment to mine back in Brooklyn, NY. I had two sets of wide loaders and long haulers to carry numerous loads, and I had lots of experience carrying bunches of bulky things before then too. However, this one trip I was riding along with both sides of my Xtracycle loaded up with my wife’s things, and I thought I had plenty of space between the parked cars and a car waiting at the red light.

                      Unfortunately I did not take into account the front wheel of a parked SUV. It was turned slightly outward toward the street probably in an attempt to make it easier to drive out of the parking space later on. In any case the load on the right side was protruding just a bit more than the wide-loaders usually do and that cause it to come into slight contact with the parked cars wheel. This jarred my whole bike, and even though I was going pretty slow as I was maneuvering between the parked and waiting cars the forward momentum of me, my bike, and the massive load was enough to cause the SUV’s tire to bounce me directly into one of the cars waiting at the light, so I crashed. I was not hurt, but a wooden rocking chair I was hauling did crack and my front poly-carbon Aerospoke wheel has never been exactly true since. L The SUV was totally fine and I was surprised when the driver of the waiting car seemed more concerned with my well being than any potential damage to his car. Fortunately there did not seem to be any, even though I collided directly into it.

                      Hopefully this little true tale of mine is a good example of why you should keep the bulk of your loads on the traffic side of your path. Moving objects can always move to avoid you, but stationary things will not move out of your way. It is kind of like that story where a guy radios a battle-ship/carrier and tells them they have to change their course because the war-ship is headed towards the radio caller’s position, then the captain of the battle ship gets annoyed and orders the radio caller to move THEIR boat because a large military vessel of the United States always has the right of way. Of course that is when the radio caller politely explains they are in a lighthouse, not a boat… thus making the captain sound like a pompous idiot.

           

          Ride safe,

          _TONE_

           

        • Mark Garvey
          ... Something to ALWAYS keep in mind is the width of your Wide loaders and load! I have occasionally scarked the Wide Loaders into curbs or retaining walls
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 2, 2009
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            On Sun, Mar 1, 2009 at 8:31 PM, Tone <tone@...> wrote:

            I thought I had plenty of space between the parked cars and a car waiting at the red light.

                        Unfortunately I did not take into account the front wheel of a parked SUV.


            Something to ALWAYS keep in mind is the width of your Wide loaders and load!  I have occasionally scarked the Wide Loaders into curbs or retaining walls around my neighborhood.  It is ALWAYS a shocker and feels pretty strange.  the bike jumps AWAY from the obstacle which can be unsettling if you don't fall down!

            Papa Mark




            "I just like to blow things up!"

            Papa Balloon
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