Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Free Radical for 20" bike? My son needs his own!

Expand Messages
  • The DINKs
    Does anyone have any idea if a free radical can be outfitted for a 20 bike? My son starts kindergarten in the fall, and I want to get him used to carrying
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 11, 2009
      Does anyone have any idea if a free radical can be outfitted for a 20" bike?  My son starts kindergarten in the fall, and I want to get him used to carrying his own weight (seriously....have you weighed the average school kid's backpack lately?) at a young age.  :-)  I would love to set an X up for him on a 20" bike, but may have to settle for standard panniers.

      MaryBeth
      www.dinkswithkids.com
    • David Chase
      The tongue is almost certainly too long. That is, there is not enough distance from the kickstand attachment point, to the rear dropouts.
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 11, 2009
        The tongue is almost certainly too long. That is, there is not enough
        distance from the kickstand attachment point, to the rear dropouts.

        On 2009-02-11, at 10:25 AM, The DINKs wrote:
        > Does anyone have any idea if a free radical can be outfitted for a
        > 20" bike?
      • Tone
        While a FreeRadical might be too long to attach to a bike frame originally made for 20 wheels, there may be another option. Get a bike frame originally made
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 11, 2009
          While a FreeRadical might be too long to attach to a bike frame originally
          made for 20" wheels, there may be another option.
          Get a bike frame originally made for 26" wheels, but get it in as small a
          frame-size as you can find. Once you have that, then get at least one 20"
          rear wheel, which is disc brake compatible or a 20" wheel with a coaster
          brake. You will never be able to set up horse-shoe/V-brakes for braking on
          the rim though because brake mounts for those kinds of brakes would be too
          far from the rim of the 20" wheels.
          For the front wheel you should be able replace the fork for one more
          suited for a 20" wheel, then you should be able to get either rim or disc
          brakes.

          20" wheels with disc brake compatibility are not as readily available, but
          they are definitely out there, particularly if you look around for wheels
          marketed to recumbent riders.

          The other concern you should have in doing this is making sure any 20"
          wheel you get has a hub wide enough to fit properly into the FreeRadical's
          drop outs. Other than that the only thing you will probably need to worry
          about is how weird the bike might look with all the extra dead space
          around the rear wheel. :)
          _TONE_
        • Jeff Snavely
          That sure is a lot of work to carry the books of a kindergartner.
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 11, 2009
            That sure is a lot of work to carry the books of a kindergartner.



            On Wed, Feb 11, 2009 at 11:33 AM, Tone <tone@...> wrote:

            While a FreeRadical might be too long to attach to a bike frame originally
            made for 20" wheels, there may be another option.
            Get a bike frame originally made for 26" wheels, but get it in as small a
            frame-size as you can find. Once you have that, then get at least one 20"
            rear wheel, which is disc brake compatible or a 20" wheel with a coaster
            brake. You will never be able to set up horse-shoe/V-brakes for braking on
            the rim though because brake mounts for those kinds of brakes would be too
            far from the rim of the 20" wheels.
            For the front wheel you should be able replace the fork for one more
            suited for a 20" wheel, then you should be able to get either rim or disc
            brakes.

            20" wheels with disc brake compatibility are not as readily available, but
            they are definitely out there, particularly if you look around for wheels
            marketed to recumbent riders.

            The other concern you should have in doing this is making sure any 20"
            wheel you get has a hub wide enough to fit properly into the FreeRadical's
            drop outs. Other than that the only thing you will probably need to worry
            about is how weird the bike might look with all the extra dead space
            around the rear wheel. :)
            _TONE_


          • Rick Pickett
            Good tips. I d just like to note that we don t recommend coaster brakes on an Xtracycle. Some bicycles have torqued the FreeRadical away from the host frame
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 11, 2009
              Good tips.  I'd just like to note that we don't recommend coaster brakes on an Xtracycle.  Some bicycles have torqued the FreeRadical away from the host frame dropouts.  Some people can make it work, but we've encountered a few issues with coaster brakes.

              Rick

              On Feb 11, 2009, at 8:41 AM, Jeff Snavely wrote:

              That sure is a lot of work to carry the books of a kindergartner.



              On Wed, Feb 11, 2009 at 11:33 AM, Tone <tone@cranksgiving. net> wrote:

              While a FreeRadical might be too long to attach to a bike frame originally
              made for 20" wheels, there may be another option.
              Get a bike frame originally made for 26" wheels, but get it in as small a
              frame-size as you can find. Once you have that, then get at least one 20"
              rear wheel, which is disc brake compatible or a 20" wheel with a coaster
              brake. You will never be able to set up horse-shoe/V- brakes for braking on
              the rim though because brake mounts for those kinds of brakes would be too
              far from the rim of the 20" wheels.
              For the front wheel you should be able replace the fork for one more
              suited for a 20" wheel, then you should be able to get either rim or disc
              brakes.

              20" wheels with disc brake compatibility are not as readily available, but
              they are definitely out there, particularly if you look around for wheels
              marketed to recumbent riders.

              The other concern you should have in doing this is making sure any 20"
              wheel you get has a hub wide enough to fit properly into the FreeRadical's
              drop outs. Other than that the only thing you will probably need to worry
              about is how weird the bike might look with all the extra dead space
              around the rear wheel. :)
              _TONE_




            • Tone
              Rick, You are totally right of course. I forgot about the non-recommendation for coaster brakes on Xtracycles. I was thinking about the low weight of a kid
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 12, 2009

                Rick,

                            You are totally right of course. I forgot about the non-recommendation for coaster brakes on Xtracycles. I was thinking about the low weight of a kid with his book bag along with only a small frame and smaller wheels doing a casual ride to and from school. A coaster brake might be able to handle that kind of load, but naturally what kid is going to ride to school and NOT give his friends rides on the snap-deck? That sort of thing would definitely increase the load and make a coaster brake not safe.

                _TONE_

                 

              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.