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Re: Hauling a Person with a Disability

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  • nicykathryn
    I like the previous suggestions, except for two things: the price tag, and the craftsmanship required. So here are two more suggestions, one that would be
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 5, 2008
      I like the previous suggestions, except for two things: the price tag,
      and the craftsmanship required. So here are two more suggestions, one
      that would be cheaper and easier, and one that is actually free and
      instantaneous.

      1: Build a simple support/safety cage for her: basically just a set of
      railings hose-clamped to the front and rear vertical tubes of your
      Freeloaders, with at least one cross-bar connecting them, right around
      where your passenger's back will be. You can add more bracing to your
      heart's content, time and budget and skills permitting: working with
      pipe is easy once you get the hang of it. Any friendly plumber can
      show you a couple tricks, or even do the work for you as a
      donation-in-kind to bikeABQ. But I do suggest you KEEP IT SIMPLE.
      Using a slip-sleeve joint on one side of a front freeloader tube, and
      you can remove that front quarter to allow your passenger to get in
      and out easily. This gives her some simple back support, and a
      handrail on each side to hold onto (or slump against safely). You can
      get EMT (steel tubing used for electrical conduit), hose clamps and
      corner joints from a hardware store or plumbing supply, and buy it
      from the guy who will cut them to the proper lengths for you. This
      will save you enormous time and make the stuff easier to transport
      home. Wrap the EMT with duct tape anywhere a hose clamp will hold it--
      this gives the hose clamp a better grip, minimizing wiggle and slip.
      (duct tape would protect your Freeloader tube from scratches too)
      Of course, if you're not used to balancing a heavy load without help,
      you're still kind of stuck.

      Unless...

      2: Just find a strong assistant with long legs to sit on the snapdeck
      behind her and hold her on! Tadaah, all problems solved. Despite the
      official Xtracycle weight rating, I have carried more than 400lbs with
      no trouble on a stock Motiv 36-spoke rear wheel with 2.2" tire at
      50psi... and on rutted & potholed pavement, crossing railroad tracks
      (but not dropping off curbs!). With the right assistant, she will
      ride safely and you will have the extra feet you need at a stop. No
      craftsmanship necessary, just statesmanship. ;-)


      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Ben Savoca" <ben@...> wrote:
      >
      > In a few weeks, I'll be hosting a woman who
      > has a neurological progressive disability. She's confined to a
      > wheelchair and has somewhat limited movement. She's also completely
      > obsessed with bicycles, even though she's never ridden one. I think it
      > would be a marvelous treat to put her on the back of the X, even just to
      > tool around the block. Of course, my primary concern is for her safety.
      > I'm not sure of how much upper body strength she has, and I'm somewhat
      > worried that she might have trouble staying upright. Furthermore, when
      > I come to a stop, I need that second pair of legs to help stabilize the
      > bike.
    • cizauskas.carrie
      Hi Ben, We re really interested to see what you (and others) come up with as a solution here. I don t have any ideas off the top of my head at the moment, but
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 5, 2008
        Hi Ben,

        We're really interested to see what you (and others) come up with as a solution here. I
        don't have any ideas off the top of my head at the moment, but this might set some of the
        other folks at Xtracycle to brainstorming. Please let us know what you come up with and,
        if it works, we'd love to see some pictures and get a story from you about your actual
        ride(s).

        carrie

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Ben Savoca" <ben@...> wrote:
        >
        > My fellow Long-Truckin' Cargo Haulers (and Joel), I'm a city ambassador
        > for Couchsurfing.com, and my Xtracycle gets rave reviews from all the
        > guests that I haul around. In a few weeks, I'll be hosting a woman who
        > has a neurological progressive disability. She's confined to a
        > wheelchair and has somewhat limited movement. She's also completely
        > obsessed with bicycles, even though she's never ridden one. I think it
        > would be a marvelous treat to put her on the back of the X, even just to
        > tool around the block. Of course, my primary concern is for her safety.
        > I'm not sure of how much upper body strength she has, and I'm somewhat
        > worried that she might have trouble staying upright. Furthermore, when
        > I come to a stop, I need that second pair of legs to help stabilize the
        > bike. I'm tempted to get a cam strap to use as a seatbelt, but I worry
        > that might almost put her in even more danger if the bike falls over and
        > she can't roll off. Has anyone had any experience hauling someone with
        > a disability, and do you have any suggestions? I would really like to
        > do this, but I fully understand that there are some severe risks
        > involved. Many thanks, --Ben Savoca Vice President BikeABQ
        > <http://www.bikeabq.org>  
        >
      • BRUCE WILSON
        Wike Trailers extra large passenger trailer will take a passenger up to 5 10/150 lbs.
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 5, 2008
          Wike Trailers' extra large passenger trailer will take a passenger up to 5'10/150 lbs.
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