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Re: Nashbar Trekking Bar, was PolyEthylene SnapDeck...

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  • Richard
    Tone, I agree I had the bars turned around at first also with the brake and shiftes on the open end of the tube but it was just to close. The bike is a little
    Message 1 of 20 , Oct 18, 2008
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      Tone,

      I agree I had the bars turned around at first also with the brake
      and shiftes on the open end of the tube but it was just to close. The
      bike is a little smaller then what I probley should be riding , I am
      6'3". I have my bars like yours now and the brake and shifters and
      closer to the Stem. Today is the first day riding it like this so we
      shall see.
      I will put a link to photo's.
      The lighting :
      http://picasaweb.google.com/Richardd0317/LightingForTeddy?
      authkey=w6MPqtS3czk#
      The bike:
      http://picasaweb.google.com/Richardd0317/HeHasANameTeddyForTheTeddyWeR
      escuedOffTheRoad?authkey=Zy-XXiaQu8c#

      Rick

      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Tone@... wrote:
      >
      > Richard,
      >
      > I sincerely do really like the Nashbar Trekking bars. Although I
      > installed my bars flipped around from what the manufacturer
      intended.
      > I personally prefer it when the open end of a curled handlebar is
      > forward rather than closer to the rider. I do not like the idea of
      > possibly colliding, even at a glancing blow, into something and
      having
      > the front of the handle bar break off, which would totally drop my
      > grip and control on things. The way i have my Trekking bars
      flipped
      > around at least gives me the chance that the open end of the bars
      > would get the impact and either bend or break with me still
      grasping
      > the rest of the handle bar connected to the bike.
      >
      > Here are some older photos of how I have my handlebars positioned:
      > http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromFront.jpg
      > and
      > http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromRear.jpg
      >
      > Please ignore the oversized bar "wrap" in the photos. It was an
      > experiment where I used kiddie-pool foam noodles as cushioning
      around
      > my handlebars then wrapped them with double-sided Velcro. I have
      to
      > admit it was super padded and way comfy, but it did look pretty
      silly.
      > The Velcro straps being wrapped around the foam tubing not only
      kept
      > the foam in place, but also allowed me to store the Velcro straps,
      > which I occasionally use as load-securing straps.
      >
      > I will admit the way I installed the Trekking bars took a little
      to
      > get use to, especially handling the brakes, but I am really liking
      > them now. One cool thing about my set up is that I can actually
      slide
      > my forearms into the curls of the handle bars, which was another
      > reason why I experimented with extra-padded pool-noodles. :) With
      my
      > arms in the curls of the bar I can drop my upper body down and get
      > into a more aerodynamic position while also not having to grip
      > anything at all with my palms. That is really nice if I am riding
      for
      > a long time and just want to rest my sore hands.
      >
      > Something of note in the way I positioned my brake levers with the
      > flipped Trekking bars... I actually forcefully bent the brake
      lever
      > mounts open enough to get them to slide around the curves of the
      > Trekking bars. I was a bit worried about compromising the
      structural
      > integrity of the brakes mounts, but I did that a couple of years
      ago
      > and have never had a problem.
      >
      > When I get a chance t install the foam tube grips I ordered from
      > McMaster.com, I will post photos of what it all looks like. I KNOW
      it
      > will look way better than those kiddie-pool foam noodles. :)
      >
      > Richard, another possible reason you might be experiencing issues
      with
      > the Trekking bars might be because your bike frame is a little
      small
      > for you? I would imagine your bike felt comfortable to you before
      hand
      > though, so I could be wrong. However, there is a chance it was on
      the
      > small side from what your ideal frame geometry should be and you
      just
      > never really noticed. It is not like I ever got measured and sized
      up
      > perfectly for any bike frame in my life. :)
      >
      > Ride safe,
      > _TONE_
      >
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