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Re: [rootsradicals] Crank Forward

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  • Vik
    Emily - having ridden a RANS crank forward for many miles they are very stable bikes and being bale to put your feet down while seated is awesome for easy
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 1, 2008
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      Emily - having ridden a RANS crank forward for many miles they are very stable bikes and being bale to put your feet down while seated is awesome for easy starts and stops.  I haven't carried a huge load with one, but I think it would make a great donor bike for an Xtracycle or in the form of the Hammer Truck.

      One thing I do find is that standing up on the pedals is not as easy as a normal upright bike.  Although this will depend on the relation of the pedals to the seat so some crank forward designs make this easier and some more difficult.  I use the gears more on a crank forward and shift rather than stand up.  Having said that I do the same with my Big Dummy when loaded - using the gears to adjust speed rather than standing up.

      safe riding,

      Vik
      www.vikram-banerjee.com
      www.thelazyrando.com
      www.viks-tikit.com
      www.viks-bigdummy.com



      On 1-Oct-08, at 8:06 AM, Emily Wigley wrote:

      I have a question about crank forward design. I am just learning 
      about it, so please bear with me. I see that this would be wonderful 
      for stand up pedaling with a load, but when one is sitting and 
      pedaling, is the balance off? Most activities in a sitting position 
      give better strength and balance when legs are either way out in 
      front (i.e., rowing), or directly below one's center of balance 
      (hips, shoulders, feet in line). Just wondering what it feels like; 
      it looks awkward and unbalanced to me. But that's just my visual 
      impression.
      Emily

      Emily Wigley
      ewigley@mindspring. com
      www.FishBowlFarm. com


    • JJ Ark
      thats interesting, and soemthing I hadn t thought of before: I almost Never stand, except to overcome inertia at traffic signals, and even then, its just for
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 1, 2008
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        thats interesting, and soemthing I hadn't thought of before:

        I almost Never stand, except to overcome inertia at traffic signals, and even then, its just for the first pedal or two.

        I think this is because when you have kids on back, they would get jostled back and forth repeatedly, possibly thrown.

        When you have a load in back, it gets thrown from side to side, creating instability -- think 200lbs or so back there.

        So you generally do not want to stand up on the pedals.

        for that reason, a wide range of gearing is critical.

        JJ

        On Oct 1, 2008, at 8:22 AM, Vik wrote:


        Emily - having ridden a RANS crank forward for many miles they are very stable bikes and being bale to put your feet down while seated is awesome for easy starts and stops.  I haven't carried a huge load with one, but I think it would make a great donor bike for an Xtracycle or in the form of the Hammer Truck.

        One thing I do find is that standing up on the pedals is not as easy as a normal upright bike.  Although this will depend on the relation of the pedals to the seat so some crank forward designs  make this easier and some more difficult.  I use the gears more on a crank forward and shift rather than stand up.  Having said that I do the same with my Big Dummy when loaded - using the gears to adjust speed rather than standing up.

        safe riding,

        Vik
        www.vikram-banerjee .com
        www.thelazyrando. com
        www.viks-tikit. com
        www.viks-bigdummy. com



        On 1-Oct-08, at 8:06 AM, Emily Wigley wrote:

        I have a question about crank forward design. I am just learning 
        about it, so please bear with me. I see that this would be wonderful 
        for stand up pedaling with a load, but when one is sitting and 
        pedaling, is the balance off? Most activities in a sitting position 
        give better strength and balance when legs are either way out in 
        front (i.e., rowing), or directly below one's center of balance 
        (hips, shoulders, feet in line). Just wondering what it feels like; 
        it looks awkward and unbalanced to me. But that's just my visual 
        impression.
        Emily

        Emily Wigley
        ewigley@mindspring. com
        www.FishBowlFarm. com




        JJ Ark

        "Jennifer: I don't want to eat your skin, Madonna! I'm not a crazy!
        Dawn: Yeah, she's not even a fan. She hates your work! "
        -- French and Saunders

      • Devian Gilbert
        I m one of those people that likes to stand up... and pedal i swap back and forth, typically use a spin for a bit, grab a bigger gear, and stand... for
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 1, 2008
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          I'm one of those people that likes to stand up... and pedal

          i swap back and forth, typically use a spin for a bit, grab a bigger gear, and stand... for awhile... then sit back down and spin.
          i also like to simply stand up and stretch, possibly dig around thru a bar bag for some food, or something...

          i also like to be able to tuck into something of a cannon ball shape, and let things go, awhile...
          standing up and all that jazz, is pretty crucial to being in the dirt...

          standing up thru traffic... that lets you see whats going on...
          and its always nice to use your body in different ways on the bike.

          but... there are a lot of people that ride recumbents

          "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

          On Oct 1, 2008, at 9:29 AM, JJ Ark wrote:


          thats interesting, and soemthing I hadn't thought of before:

          I almost Never stand, except to overcome inertia at traffic signals, and even then, its just for the first pedal or two.

          I think this is because when you have kids on back, they would get jostled back and forth repeatedly, possibly thrown.

          When you have a load in back, it gets thrown from side to side, creating instability -- think 200lbs or so back there.

          So you generally do not want to stand up on the pedals.

          for that reason, a wide range of gearing is critical.

          JJ

          On Oct 1, 2008, at 8:22 AM, Vik wrote:


          Emily - having ridden a RANS crank forward for many miles they are very stable bikes and being bale to put your feet down while seated is awesome for easy starts and stops.  I haven't carried a huge load with one, but I think it would make a great donor bike for an Xtracycle or in the form of the Hammer Truck.

          One thing I do find is that standing up on the pedals is not as easy as a normal upright bike.  Although this will depend on the relation of the pedals to the seat so some crank forward designs  make this easier and some more difficult.  I use the gears more on a crank forward and shift rather than stand up.  Having said that I do the same with my Big Dummy when loaded - using the gears to adjust speed rather than standing up.

          safe riding,

          Vik
          www.vikram-banerjee .com
          www.thelazyrando. com
          www.viks-tikit. com
          www.viks-bigdummy. com



          On 1-Oct-08, at 8:06 AM, Emily Wigley wrote:

          I have a question about crank forward design. I am just learning 
          about it, so please bear with me. I see that this would be wonderful 
          for stand up pedaling with a load, but when one is sitting and 
          pedaling, is the balance off? Most activities in a sitting position 
          give better strength and balance when legs are either way out in 
          front (i.e., rowing), or directly below one's center of balance 
          (hips, shoulders, feet in line). Just wondering what it feels like; 
          it looks awkward and unbalanced to me. But that's just my visual 
          impression.
          Emily

          Emily Wigley
          ewigley@mindspring. com
          www.FishBowlFarm. com




          JJ Ark

          "Jennifer: I don't want to eat your skin, Madonna! I'm not a crazy!
          Dawn: Yeah, she's not even a fan. She hates your work! "
          -- French and Saunders



        • Jeff Snavely
          There are two issues with crank-forward - first, it s almost impossible to stand and pedal on some bikes, and very awkward on others - depending on how far
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 1, 2008
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            There are two issues with crank-forward

            - first, it's almost impossible to stand and pedal on some bikes, and very awkward on others - depending on how far forward the cranks are, and the bars you have on the bike.
            - strong pedaling, such as climbing, causes additional stress on your hands because you have to hold on to keep from pushing yourself off the back of the seat.

            The seat on something like the RANS helps alleviate the later issue.





            On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 10:06 AM, Emily Wigley <ewigley@...> wrote:

            I have a question about crank forward design. I am just learning
            about it, so please bear with me. I see that this would be wonderful
            for stand up pedaling with a load, but when one is sitting and
            pedaling, is the balance off? Most activities in a sitting position
            give better strength and balance when legs are either way out in
            front (i.e., rowing), or directly below one's center of balance
            (hips, shoulders, feet in line). Just wondering what it feels like;
            it looks awkward and unbalanced to me. But that's just my visual
            impression.
            Emily

            Emily Wigley
            ewigley@...
            www.FishBowlFarm.com


          • Vik
            You allude to it, but I ve never felt like I was sliding off the back of a RANS CF seat when pedaling hard. I agree that the CF position does not allow the
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 1, 2008
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              You allude to it, but I've never felt like I was sliding off the back of a RANS CF seat when pedaling hard.  I agree that the CF position does not allow the rider to stand up as easily...perhaps not at all in the most extreme CF bikes, but that's the trade off for a very comfortable riding position that suits a lot of folks.  Personally I'm completely happy on a normal upright bike, but I know many people who would consider them torture.  My taking the weight off the hands, sitting upright on a wide supportive seat most of those folks can easily ride a CF.

              If you are a performance rider who loves to get out of the saddle and hammer a CF won't make you happy, but that's to be expected not all bikes suit all people.

              safe riding,

              Vik
              www.vikram-banerjee.com
              www.thelazyrando.com
              www.viks-tikit.com
              www.viks-bigdummy.com



              On 1-Oct-08, at 12:22 PM, Jeff Snavely wrote:


              There are two issues with crank-forward

              - first, it's almost impossible to stand and pedal on some bikes, and very awkward on others - depending on how far forward the cranks are, and the bars you have on the bike.
              - strong pedaling, such as climbing, causes additional stress on your hands because you have to hold on to keep from pushing yourself off the back of the seat.

              The seat on something like the RANS helps alleviate the later issue.



            • MH
              ... For the most part no but it depends on the crank location as I found OR I m not the most agile person in the world. I liked what Vik and JJ had to say
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 1, 2008
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                Emily Wigley wrote:
                > I have a question about crank forward design. I am just learning
                > about it, so please bear with me. I see that this would be wonderful
                > for stand up pedaling with a load, but when one is sitting and
                > pedaling, is the balance off?

                For the most part no but it depends on the crank location
                as I found OR I'm not the most agile person in the world.
                I liked what Vik and JJ had to say about it as for me ...

                I ride three crank forward variation designed bikes.
                The ones like the Electra and RANS are much like a
                normal ordinary bikes and the feet are always ready to
                help support you from tipping. My long wheel base
                recumbents are much the same and very comfortable. Now
                my short wheel base recumbent looks like the RANS V-Rex
                with feet 20 inches or so off the ground. There is a
                learning curve to balance it at less then 3 mph.
                For example - I get so comfortable on this bike I've
                been known to fall over when stopped because I don't sit
                up to lower my landing gear. I've never been hurt after
                ten years of repeating this maneuver. I guess I'm just
                a slow learner or lazy. ;) After the first few times
                each year I eventually learn.

                With the feet forward crank designs I rely heavily on
                my granny gears for hill climbs. My triple crank has
                similar teeth counts as my mountain bikes - 22,32,44t.
                My rear cassette up to 34 teeth in first gear for the
                3 mile per hour climbs up steeper hills in my area.
                Any slower & I walk the bikes up and enjoy the view but
                for the MOST part I pedal up. -Mark H.
              • j.a. tackett
                that sounds just about right.............i do the same on long rides..........stand.......stretch.......ball up .........what made it a lot more comfortable
                Message 7 of 9 , Oct 2, 2008
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                  that sounds just about right.............i do the same on long rides..........stand.......stretch.......ball up .........what made it a lot more comfortable was
                  raising my handle bars with stem extender

                  --- On Wed, 10/1/08, Devian Gilbert <asanacycles@...> wrote:
                  From: Devian Gilbert <asanacycles@...>
                  Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] Crank Forward
                  To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Wednesday, October 1, 2008, 10:43 AM

                  I'm one of those people that likes to stand up... and pedal

                  i swap back and forth, typically use a spin for a bit, grab a bigger gear, and stand... for awhile... then sit back down and spin.
                  i also like to simply stand up and stretch, possibly dig around thru a bar bag for some food, or something...

                  i also like to be able to tuck into something of a cannon ball shape, and let things go, awhile...
                  standing up and all that jazz, is pretty crucial to being in the dirt...

                  standing up thru traffic... that lets you see whats going on...
                  and its always nice to use your body in different ways on the bike.

                  but... there are a lot of people that ride recumbents

                  "Bicycle Lifestyle, realized." D.G.

                  On Oct 1, 2008, at 9:29 AM, JJ Ark wrote:


                  thats interesting, and soemthing I hadn't thought of before:

                  I almost Never stand, except to overcome inertia at traffic signals, and even then, its just for the first pedal or two.

                  I think this is because when you have kids on back, they would get jostled back and forth repeatedly, possibly thrown.

                  When you have a load in back, it gets thrown from side to side, creating instability -- think 200lbs or so back there.

                  So you generally do not want to stand up on the pedals.

                  for that reason, a wide range of gearing is critical.

                  JJ

                  On Oct 1, 2008, at 8:22 AM, Vik wrote:


                  Emily - having ridden a RANS crank forward for many miles they are very stable bikes and being bale to put your feet down while seated is awesome for easy starts and stops.  I haven't carried a huge load with one, but I think it would make a great donor bike for an Xtracycle or in the form of the Hammer Truck.

                  One thing I do find is that standing up on the pedals is not as easy as a normal upright bike.  Although this will depend on the relation of the pedals to the seat so some crank forward designs  make this easier and some more difficult.  I use the gears more on a crank forward and shift rather than stand up.  Having said that I do the same with my Big Dummy when loaded - using the gears to adjust speed rather than standing up.

                  safe riding,

                  Vik
                  www.vikram-banerjee .com
                  www.thelazyrando. com
                  www.viks-tikit. com
                  www.viks-bigdummy. com



                  On 1-Oct-08, at 8:06 AM, Emily Wigley wrote:

                  I have a question about crank forward design. I am just learning 
                  about it, so please bear with me. I see that this would be wonderful 
                  for stand up pedaling with a load, but when one is sitting and 
                  pedaling, is the balance off? Most activities in a sitting position 
                  give better strength and balance when legs are either way out in 
                  front (i.e., rowing), or directly below one's center of balance 
                  (hips, shoulders, feet in line). Just wondering what it feels like; 
                  it looks awkward and unbalanced to me. But that's just my visual 
                  impression.
                  Emily

                  Emily Wigley
                  ewigley@mindspring. com
                  www.FishBowlFarm. com



                  JJ Ark

                  "Jennifer: I don't want to eat your skin, Madonna! I'm not a crazy!
                  Dawn: Yeah, she's not even a fan. She hates your work! "
                  -- French and Saunders




                • Emily Wigley
                  Thanks for all the crank forward info. It s great to be learning from you all! Emily
                  Message 8 of 9 , Oct 2, 2008
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                    Thanks for all the crank forward info.
                    It's great to be learning from you all!
                    Emily
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