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Re: Rohloff, disks

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  • David Dannenberg
    Thanks all for the great advice! Much good food for thought. Sounds like a trade between easy repairability (cables) and dirt and moisture proof reliability.
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 2, 2008
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      Thanks all for the great advice! Much good food for thought. Sounds
      like a trade between easy repairability (cables) and dirt and moisture
      proof reliability.

      My situation is this. I have been commuting mostly on a Cannondale
      mountain bike that over time has had everything replaced but the
      handle bars and fork! It is not that I do tough technical riding, but
      that I ride on a dirt road that is wet about 7 months and surfaced
      such that riding on it when it is wet is akin to spraying the bike
      down with a fine aerosol of grit, layer after layer. Two months per
      year the grit takes the form of abrasive dust...I basically replace
      the entire drive train about every two years or less. My experience
      with brakes on the thing is that it came with hydraulic disks that
      were continually out of adjustment (not helped by the fact that I
      store the bike on end) and which I finally chucked in favor of Avid
      cable disks. These are OK though I burn through pads with some
      frequency due to the steepness of the descents on the ride. (My
      experience with brakes in general is that well tuned rim brakes are
      wonderful--my tandem has fabulous rim brakes that are better generally
      than the brakes on any of my other brakes--but which do not see the
      grit and abuse of the other brakesets either, and which are
      supplemented by a drum drag brake for long descents...there seems to
      be as much in adjustment as there is in design as far as feel and
      function)

      I do know that modern hydraulic systems are very very good, though
      some people claim that unless you are a downhiller you don't need them
      and cable systems are fine. I have not had trouble with brake cables
      freezing, though my shifters do freeze and cease to function when I
      get enough mud and ice in there; the sealed nature therefore of the
      hydraulic systems is very appealing. And despite what I wrote above, I
      think that disk brakes, properly adjusted, stop a lot better than rim
      brakes and are not compromised as much by moisture or ice (snow that
      is). So I think that disks are the way to go, but I am still on the
      fence about hydraulic or cable. On one post or website somewhere
      hydraulic brakes were recommended for the BD because of the problem of
      cable stretch over the long length of the bike. Hmmm...hasn't been a
      problem on the tandem...

      I do steep descents and ride in gritty muddy dusty conditions...

      Thanks again.

      David
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