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Re: new xtracycle, keeping kids dry and warm

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  • MCNattyP
    Thanks for these recommendations. I ve seen the sunshade/rainshell for the hand-made seats. My daughter is old/large enough that she ll be sitting on the deck
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 29, 2008
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      Thanks for these recommendations. I've seen the sunshade/rainshell for
      the hand-made seats. My daughter is old/large enough that she'll be
      sitting on the deck directly (with a pad maybe), and a stoker
      stem/handlebars. I.e. no dedicated kid seat.

      I'll check out the clever cycles supply of ponchos. It looks like
      that, combined with rubber rain pants and rubber boots will be a good
      solution.

      On an unrelated note, today we met my wife at a remote bus stop, got
      groceries (including a case of beer and a gallon of milk), then
      proceeded to ride home with groceries, her, me, and daughter all
      onboard. It was wobbly for sure, but impossible with nearly any other
      system.
    • Morgan
      Isn t that such a cool feeling, to ride your bike home with kids and groceries, not needing the car to do so? I ve been doing it for a couple years now, and I
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 30, 2008
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        Isn't that such a cool feeling, to ride your bike home with kids and groceries,
        not needing the car to do so?

        I've been doing it for a couple years now, and I still get a kick out of it -
        because it used to seem "impossible". I love doing the impossible!

        BTW - I second the suggestion for rain ponchos for the little ones. That's
        what I use.

        Morgan


        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "MCNattyP" <mcnattyp@...> wrote:

        > On an unrelated note, today we met my wife at a remote bus stop, got
        > groceries (including a case of beer and a gallon of milk), then
        > proceeded to ride home with groceries, her, me, and daughter all
        > onboard. It was wobbly for sure, but impossible with nearly any other
        > system.
        >
      • Jay & Liz
        Hi Nat, I m in Portland too. We picked up our X up a few weeks ago but also have a Bike Friday Family Tandem as our primary kid hauler. WE had a full body
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 1, 2008
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          Hi Nat,
          I'm in Portland too. We picked up our X up a few weeks ago but also have a Bike Friday
          Family Tandem as our primary kid hauler. WE had a full body suit from REI when our kids
          were small (less than 3) it was the best. Now we go with rain pants/Jacket/boots/mittens
          (we have a couple pair. Some cheap shop glasses might be good for some of the bigger
          downpours that we occasionally get. We also always have a pair or two of Baby Legs (like
          mini leg warmers) for emergencies. They can add a layer to kids arms or legs be folded
          over for mittens, tie downs, etc.

          That gets us through all but the coldest days. I want to ride even on the coldest days, so
          inspired by stoutag's photos, right now my wife is off buying fabric so we can build a rain
          canopy for the back half of the bike. If I can figure it out I hope to make it multi
          FUNKtional so that it will work on our X also. Updates will follow.

          Rollin' PDXFamily Style,
          JayS.

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "MCNattyP" <mcnattyp@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for these recommendations. I've seen the sunshade/rainshell for
          > the hand-made seats. My daughter is old/large enough that she'll be
          > sitting on the deck directly (with a pad maybe), and a stoker
          > stem/handlebars. I.e. no dedicated kid seat.
          >
          > I'll check out the clever cycles supply of ponchos. It looks like
          > that, combined with rubber rain pants and rubber boots will be a good
          > solution.
          >
          > On an unrelated note, today we met my wife at a remote bus stop, got
          > groceries (including a case of beer and a gallon of milk), then
          > proceeded to ride home with groceries, her, me, and daughter all
          > onboard. It was wobbly for sure, but impossible with nearly any other
          > system.
          >
        • JJ
          Wool and a shell. Since we homeschool, the kids are outside a good 4 hours a day even in the dead of winter, and we have learned a few things: 1. Synthetics
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 22, 2008
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            Wool and a shell.

            Since we homeschool, the kids are outside a good 4 hours a day even in
            the dead of winter, and we have learned a few things:

            1. Synthetics are fine indoors, but they are horrible for wind and/or
            rain. Coke bottle clothing holds on to water like a sponge, and then
            your kidlet gets COLD. Wind rips through my fleece vests, but my wool
            vests hold out the weather much more effectively and do not hold on to
            water.

            2. Wool gets wet, and doesnt' lose its loft or absorb, so it stays
            warmer longer. I also dries out a little faster on it's own.

            3. Boots: get yer kidlet galoshes that are a size too big and put on
            some nice warm wool socks (bonus points for home-knits--they make they
            best socks for kids and are super fast to whip out.)

            4. Helmet covers: get one. keeps the warm in and the water out. about
            19$ Thin knit caps inside are good too, and tape over the holes works
            in a pinch (keep a roll of sturdy clear tape in the pocket of your
            freeloader for just this emergency.)

            5. Mittens rock. Gloves are fine, but toss an extra pair of cheap wool
            mittens into your freeloader pocket for use in an emergency or when a
            kiddo forgets their gloves at home or...wherever they were 10 mins ago
            ;-) Andy and bax has 'em for cheap--I paid 3.50? for our "backup
            pair". I went with the smallest I could find.

            6. Goggles are fun! And practical: they keep rain out of little eyes.
            Look for clear kid's safety glasses at Joes (8$ or so in the shooting
            sports section) or sping for something fun and steampunky at A&B--I
            think I paid 13$ for weird gooo gooo googley eye pair we use.

            7. Ponchos as a shell. Kinda goes over their everything, and can be
            draped over their knees. I am fond of a pair of rain pants under
            there, but don't spend too much on the raingear--they outgrow it too
            quickly to justify 100$ expenditures, and the adult stuff just doesn't
            fit for them. The cheap plastic ponchos are junk. Serious junk. Go
            with cloth, even if it's a little more spendy.

            Note that the ONLY bike specific thing I mentioned was a helmet cover.
            Everything else is applicable across the board, and will make your kid
            a hap hap happy kid on the playground as well as on the back of the bike.

            I got to thinking about snackies. Perhaps you could rig up a tray or
            small basket that would hold a cup for snacks?

            JJ
          • Cara Lin Bridgman
            Absolutely! I ve one niece who, when she was 4 or so, spent the whole summer in goggles: pool, park, church, dinner, concerts... CL
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 22, 2008
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              Absolutely! I've one niece who, when she was 4 or so, spent the whole
              summer in goggles: pool, park, church, dinner, concerts...

              CL

              JJ wrote:
              > 6. Goggles are fun! And practical: they keep rain out of little eyes.
              > Look for clear kid's safety glasses at Joes (8$ or so in the shooting
              > sports section) or sping for something fun and steampunky at A&B--I
              > think I paid 13$ for weird gooo gooo googley eye pair we use.
            • Jay & Liz
              We always have Baby Legs with us. They are legwarmers for babies but they make great arm/legwarmers for kids too, and in a pinch they can be used as mittens
              Message 6 of 12 , Sep 23, 2008
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                We always have Baby Legs with us. They are legwarmers for babies but they make great
                arm/legwarmers for kids too, and in a pinch they can be used as mittens when we leave
                ours at home.

                As far as the helmet cover is concerned no need to buy one. We use shower caps from
                hotels. I keep a few in the bag and wip them out if needed. We have been able to use the
                same three for the last two years for our family of four.

                I also agree with wool. Sythetic fleece does keep you warm when wet and dry faster (it
                even keeps the wind out if you get a windstopper product) but the wool takes longer to
                saturate and has natural wind resistance depending on the weave, as well as all the
                environmental benefits. Wool does have it's own oder but sythetics hold your stink (I stink
                worse than wet wool).

                I have replaced all my poly pro underwear with silk and am much happier.

                JayS.


                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "JJ" <jj@...> wrote:
                >
                > Wool and a shell.
                >
                > Since we homeschool, the kids are outside a good 4 hours a day even in
                > the dead of winter, and we have learned a few things:
                >
                > 1. Synthetics are fine indoors, but they are horrible for wind and/or
                > rain. Coke bottle clothing holds on to water like a sponge, and then
                > your kidlet gets COLD. Wind rips through my fleece vests, but my wool
                > vests hold out the weather much more effectively and do not hold on to
                > water.
                >
                > 2. Wool gets wet, and doesnt' lose its loft or absorb, so it stays
                > warmer longer. I also dries out a little faster on it's own.
                >
                > 3. Boots: get yer kidlet galoshes that are a size too big and put on
                > some nice warm wool socks (bonus points for home-knits--they make they
                > best socks for kids and are super fast to whip out.)
                >
                > 4. Helmet covers: get one. keeps the warm in and the water out. about
                > 19$ Thin knit caps inside are good too, and tape over the holes works
                > in a pinch (keep a roll of sturdy clear tape in the pocket of your
                > freeloader for just this emergency.)
                >
                > 5. Mittens rock. Gloves are fine, but toss an extra pair of cheap wool
                > mittens into your freeloader pocket for use in an emergency or when a
                > kiddo forgets their gloves at home or...wherever they were 10 mins ago
                > ;-) Andy and bax has 'em for cheap--I paid 3.50? for our "backup
                > pair". I went with the smallest I could find.
                >
                > 6. Goggles are fun! And practical: they keep rain out of little eyes.
                > Look for clear kid's safety glasses at Joes (8$ or so in the shooting
                > sports section) or sping for something fun and steampunky at A&B--I
                > think I paid 13$ for weird gooo gooo googley eye pair we use.
                >
                > 7. Ponchos as a shell. Kinda goes over their everything, and can be
                > draped over their knees. I am fond of a pair of rain pants under
                > there, but don't spend too much on the raingear--they outgrow it too
                > quickly to justify 100$ expenditures, and the adult stuff just doesn't
                > fit for them. The cheap plastic ponchos are junk. Serious junk. Go
                > with cloth, even if it's a little more spendy.
                >
                > Note that the ONLY bike specific thing I mentioned was a helmet cover.
                > Everything else is applicable across the board, and will make your kid
                > a hap hap happy kid on the playground as well as on the back of the bike.
                >
                > I got to thinking about snackies. Perhaps you could rig up a tray or
                > small basket that would hold a cup for snacks?
                >
                > JJ
                >
              • Jay & Liz
                What s A&B
                Message 7 of 12 , Sep 23, 2008
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                  What's A&B

                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "JJ" <jj@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Wool and a shell.
                  >
                  > Since we homeschool, the kids are outside a good 4 hours a day even in
                  > the dead of winter, and we have learned a few things:
                  >
                  > 1. Synthetics are fine indoors, but they are horrible for wind and/or
                  > rain. Coke bottle clothing holds on to water like a sponge, and then
                  > your kidlet gets COLD. Wind rips through my fleece vests, but my wool
                  > vests hold out the weather much more effectively and do not hold on to
                  > water.
                  >
                  > 2. Wool gets wet, and doesnt' lose its loft or absorb, so it stays
                  > warmer longer. I also dries out a little faster on it's own.
                  >
                  > 3. Boots: get yer kidlet galoshes that are a size too big and put on
                  > some nice warm wool socks (bonus points for home-knits--they make they
                  > best socks for kids and are super fast to whip out.)
                  >
                  > 4. Helmet covers: get one. keeps the warm in and the water out. about
                  > 19$ Thin knit caps inside are good too, and tape over the holes works
                  > in a pinch (keep a roll of sturdy clear tape in the pocket of your
                  > freeloader for just this emergency.)
                  >
                  > 5. Mittens rock. Gloves are fine, but toss an extra pair of cheap wool
                  > mittens into your freeloader pocket for use in an emergency or when a
                  > kiddo forgets their gloves at home or...wherever they were 10 mins ago
                  > ;-) Andy and bax has 'em for cheap--I paid 3.50? for our "backup
                  > pair". I went with the smallest I could find.
                  >
                  > 6. Goggles are fun! And practical: they keep rain out of little eyes.
                  > Look for clear kid's safety glasses at Joes (8$ or so in the shooting
                  > sports section) or sping for something fun and steampunky at A&B--I
                  > think I paid 13$ for weird gooo gooo googley eye pair we use.
                  >
                  > 7. Ponchos as a shell. Kinda goes over their everything, and can be
                  > draped over their knees. I am fond of a pair of rain pants under
                  > there, but don't spend too much on the raingear--they outgrow it too
                  > quickly to justify 100$ expenditures, and the adult stuff just doesn't
                  > fit for them. The cheap plastic ponchos are junk. Serious junk. Go
                  > with cloth, even if it's a little more spendy.
                  >
                  > Note that the ONLY bike specific thing I mentioned was a helmet cover.
                  > Everything else is applicable across the board, and will make your kid
                  > a hap hap happy kid on the playground as well as on the back of the bike.
                  >
                  > I got to thinking about snackies. Perhaps you could rig up a tray or
                  > small basket that would hold a cup for snacks?
                  >
                  > JJ
                  >
                • JJ Ark
                  Oh, Sorry.. Andy & Bax. As an old vespa rider (no more--I saw too many horrible accidents) I am used to going to them for supplies and clothing. Old habits die
                  Message 8 of 12 , Sep 23, 2008
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                    Oh, Sorry.. Andy & Bax.

                    As an old vespa rider (no more--I saw too many horrible accidents) I am used to going to them for supplies and clothing. Old habits die hard :-)

                    JJ

                    On Sep 23, 2008, at 10:21 AM, Jay & Liz wrote:

                    What's A&B

                    --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, "JJ" <jj@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Wool and a shell.
                    > 
                    > Since we homeschool, the kids are outside a good 4 hours a day even in
                    > the dead of winter, and we have learned a few things:
                    > 
                    > 1. Synthetics are fine indoors, but they are horrible for wind and/or
                    > rain. Coke bottle clothing holds on to water like a sponge, and then
                    > your kidlet gets COLD. Wind rips through my fleece vests, but my wool
                    > vests hold out the weather much more effectively and do not hold on to
                    > water.
                    > 
                    > 2. Wool gets wet, and doesnt' lose its loft or absorb, so it stays
                    > warmer longer. I also dries out a little faster on it's own.
                    > 
                    > 3. Boots: get yer kidlet galoshes that are a size too big and put on
                    > some nice warm wool socks (bonus points for home-knits-- they make they
                    > best socks for kids and are super fast to whip out.)
                    > 
                    > 4. Helmet covers: get one. keeps the warm in and the water out. about
                    > 19$ Thin knit caps inside are good too, and tape over the holes works
                    > in a pinch (keep a roll of sturdy clear tape in the pocket of your
                    > freeloader for just this emergency.)
                    > 
                    > 5. Mittens rock. Gloves are fine, but toss an extra pair of cheap wool
                    > mittens into your freeloader pocket for use in an emergency or when a
                    > kiddo forgets their gloves at home or...wherever they were 10 mins ago
                    > ;-) Andy and bax has 'em for cheap--I paid 3.50? for our "backup
                    > pair". I went with the smallest I could find.
                    > 
                    > 6. Goggles are fun! And practical: they keep rain out of little eyes.
                    > Look for clear kid's safety glasses at Joes (8$ or so in the shooting
                    > sports section) or sping for something fun and steampunky at A&B--I
                    > think I paid 13$ for weird gooo gooo googley eye pair we use.
                    > 
                    > 7. Ponchos as a shell. Kinda goes over their everything, and can be
                    > draped over their knees. I am fond of a pair of rain pants under
                    > there, but don't spend too much on the raingear--they outgrow it too
                    > quickly to justify 100$ expenditures, and the adult stuff just doesn't
                    > fit for them. The cheap plastic ponchos are junk. Serious junk. Go
                    > with cloth, even if it's a little more spendy.
                    > 
                    > Note that the ONLY bike specific thing I mentioned was a helmet cover.
                    > Everything else is applicable across the board, and will make your kid
                    > a hap hap happy kid on the playground as well as on the back of the bike.
                    > 
                    > I got to thinking about snackies. Perhaps you could rig up a tray or
                    > small basket that would hold a cup for snacks?
                    > 
                    > JJ
                    >


                    JJ Ark

                    "Vincent, do you still want to hear my Fox Force Five joke?" -- Mia. Pulp Fiction






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