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Re: [rootsradicals] Re: OT: Brake slip question

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  • Tone@moon-shine.net
    Steve, Sorry for such a delayed response. My wife and I just bought our first home, which was built in the 1930s and we have been busy as heck fixing it up
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 28, 2008
      Steve,

      Sorry for such a delayed response. My wife and I just bought our first
      home, which was built in the 1930s and we have been busy as heck
      fixing it up while moving in.

      Anyway, some more benefits of disc brakes are:
      1) The brake pads of disc brakes do not stop/rub on the actual rims of
      the wheels, so there are no worries of grit gradually wearing away at
      your rim's side-walls. This should be a concern especially if you have
      expensive wheels!
      2) If you get into a minor accident and/or your wheel(s) become out of
      true, disc brakes will still brake as normal. Rim-based brakes may
      cause your wheel to drag or even stop completely if the wheel is untrue.
      3) Most disc brake tend to be a lot easier to adjust than rim-based brakes.

      Steve, you said "All bikes can be made to use disc brakes," but did
      you perhaps mean "most bikes?" In most cases a bike's front fork can
      be replaced with a disc-brake compatible fork, so that would convert
      at least one wheel to disc brake. However, what about bike frames
      without disc brake mounts for the rear wheel? When I had my old
      Univega 750 mountain bike I was only able to install disc brakes on my
      rear wheel when I got an updated FreeRadical frame with disc brake
      mounts.

      Also, you said one of the drawbacks of disc brakes is the potential of
      getting lube on them. However, the same would be true of rim-based
      brakes. Only an internal hub/coaster brake would be immune to lube.
      Fixing the lube-on-disc-brake problem should be as simple as wiping
      down the rotor and pads with possibly going as far as having to water,
      alcohol, or something else. Normally I ride with a bottle of water and
      a very small first aid kit, which has alcohol pads, so I can use
      either of those if really necessary. Also, the surface-area of a rim's
      side wall is way more than that of a disc brake rotor, so less
      cleaning should be needed when getting lube on disc brakes as opposed
      to getting lube on rim-based brakes.

      How often do people get lube on their disc brakes anyway? I would
      imagine the potential of lube making contact with any brake pad would
      be greater on a rim-based pad. That is because your rims spin around
      closer to the ground where their might be an oil spill, etc. Where as,
      a disc brake rotor spins much higher off the ground. Other than
      on-the-road scenarios like oil spills, I would imagine you would only
      ever get lube on your brakes during a repair session at home or in the
      shop. Obviously if that happens, you would thoroughly clean it up
      sooner than later during your maintenance.

      Ride safe,
      _TONE_
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