Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Seeking CHEAP e-assist kit

Expand Messages
  • beth
    I ve been enjoying all the hauling I ve done on my X this spring and summer. However, I live in a place with some hills and I m thinking that adding an
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 25, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I've been enjoying all the hauling I've done on my X this spring and summer.
      However, I live in a place with some hills and I'm thinking that adding an E-assist unit to my
      X might not be a bad idea.

      I cannot afford a Stokemoney. At all, not now, not in the next year. It's just too much money.
      That said, I'd like to hear recommendations for a cheaper unit, something like a "starter" unit
      that would at least get me out the door, even if I had to recharge it every day.
      Suggestions?
      thanks --Beth
    • kwikfile08
      Give Cycle9/Morgan a try... You never know what can be done. I went e-assist for my commute (30 miles each way) It really makes a difference in not being so
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 25, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Give Cycle9/Morgan a try... You never know what can be done. I went
        e-assist for my commute (30 miles each way) It really makes a
        difference in not being so tired from long rides and hills. The more
        you ride the more you'll save. I did spend some money up front, so
        there is going to be a payoff time period. I am very glad I made the
        switch. It is fun too driving by gas stations and ignoring the $ price
        per gallon

        Carl

        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "beth" <periwinklekog@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've been enjoying all the hauling I've done on my X this spring and
        summer.
        > However, I live in a place with some hills and I'm thinking that
        adding an E-assist unit to my
        > X might not be a bad idea.
        >
        > I cannot afford a Stokemoney. At all, not now, not in the next year.
        It's just too much money.
        > That said, I'd like to hear recommendations for a cheaper unit,
        something like a "starter" unit
        > that would at least get me out the door, even if I had to recharge
        it every day.
        > Suggestions?
        > thanks --Beth
        >
      • zoot_katz
        What s cheap? The Wilderness Energy kits are some of the least expensive out there but whether or not they ll meet your expectations is what you need to
        Message 3 of 13 , Aug 25, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          What's cheap?
          The Wilderness Energy kits are some of the least expensive out there
          but whether or not they'll meet your expectations is what you need to
          research.

          How much weight are you carrying over what kind of terrain? How far
          do you plan to ride it? What kind of speeds are you looking for? How
          much pedalling are you willing to do? These are variables that
          require lots of homework before arriving at a decision.

          Cheap batteries are heavy. Expensive batteries are lighter but more
          complicated.

          Water is an insidious menace.

          I can maintain a bicycle in everyday service for about $200 per year.
          One ride in a rain storm could end up costing me $200 or more if
          something gets wet and fries or welds itself.

          My original budget for buzzing le Bete was around a thousand dollars.
          After researching the subject more fully, I'm expecting to spend that
          on batteries and chargers alone.

          Having local support and/or knowing something about power electronics
          would help sort it out for you. The bike shop closest to my home is
          an internationally renowned supplier of e-bike conversion components.
          <www.ebikes.ca>. The owner, a brilliant engineer, and great kid, is
          presently riding his electrified Xtracycle across Canada on a $10
          energy budget. He rigged up an articulated steering system and is
          pedalling from a lawn chair attached to the SnapDeck.

          The choice I made for le Bete is a Crystalyte 5304 rear hub motor.
          It's a torque monster in the e-bike world. A measly 48 volts with 18
          amp hours is all the NiMh batteries I can afford but I'm quite
          willing to pedal and not too excited about going more than 20 mph.
          with regular bike brakes on a loaded X. My priorities are range and
          reliability.

          You can check out the E-Zee kits they sell at ebikes.ca. Another
          reputable and well designed bolt-on conversion is the Bionx system.
        • Morgan
          Zoot, These are great points. The number one is to try to find someone nearby, if possible, to service and support these. But the problem is, such folks are
          Message 4 of 13 , Aug 25, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Zoot,
            These are great points. The number one is to try to find someone nearby,
            if possible, to service and support these. But the problem is, such folks
            are few and far between. We are one of the very few shops in the whole
            SouthEastern USA that can deal with electric bike components. Most
            bike shops won't touch it with a 10 foot pole. I think they are afraid of
            electricity or something (humorous side note, our shop's regular bike mechanic,
            a 6' tall Tattooed and pierced guy, was very scared of the big power supply
            I brought into the shop to hook up to motors and bikes for testing! I said
            "Come on, it only goes up to 70 volts - barely enough to kill you!" At one point
            I hooked it up to a bike, and there was an unrelated noise from something falling
            off the shelf - he jumped about 5 feet!)

            Anyway, you are right - Ebikes.ca are great. We work with them a lot. (you may have seen
            the thread I started here about Justin's trip across Canada).

            But they are also very busy, and their goal (as ours) is to ultimately build up a dealer
            network so that electric bikes and kits can be installed and serviced locally. It will take
            a long time to get to that point, due to the reluctance of regular bike shops
            with this stuff.

            In the meantime, the best customers can do is try to find an online whom they
            think will provide after-sales support, warranty, reasonable return policy, etc.
            If you are thinking of using a motor with an Xtracycle, it may be great to try to find
            someone who is experienced with that angle, too.

            Ebikes.ca is one of a few that fit that bill, but there are some others (one of our
            satisfied customers here just recommended us - he bought an eZee kit from us).

            Now, on pricing. There are a number of options that don't break the bank.
            Crystalyte motors are probably a bit higher quality than Wilderness Energy. I've
            heard of a lot of problems with the WE stuff. Originally we were going to be
            a dealer, then decided not to. Even some of the Crystalyte stuff is a bit problematic -
            with the most reliable being their cheapest DC brushed motor. But that is fairly low
            power and torque, and less efficient than brushed. But it is possible to get a decent
            Crystalyte setup that won't break the bank, and should be reasonably reliable and
            long-lived. One of my family members uses a 406 Motor on an Xtracycle equipped
            bike, that has worked flawlessly.

            We also have a new line of hub motors for the "budget minded" on the way. Until
            we've done some testing of the first batch, I won't disclose more details. But anyone
            interested in being part of the beta test program can drop me a line. Note, that
            being part of a beta test program means it might fail, break, catch fire (we hope not),
            etc. But the key to these motors is a higher torque at a lower price (but not
            very high speed).

            In the end the old adage is mostly true: you get what you pay for. I know Mark Garvey
            was super excited to get his lead acid batteries replaced by Batteries Plus for free.
            If he can do that for one or two more cycles, then he will be down around the cost per
            mile of buying a LiFEPO4 battery. But in general, barring a bunch of free replacements,
            cheaper batteries are actually more expensive in the long run.

            That's not to say the expensive stuff is perfect. This is all still relatively new technology,
            and we've seen failures on everything from the cheapest stuff to the $1700 BionX stuff.
            Failures will occasionally happen. Then it comes back to: do you trust the seller to
            support you after you buy from him or her? If I was back in the shoes of being
            a customer, that is the primary question I would consider.

            Morgan
            (from Cycle9.com)



            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "zoot_katz" <zootkatz@...> wrote:
            >
            > What's cheap?
            > The Wilderness Energy kits are some of the least expensive out there
            > but whether or not they'll meet your expectations is what you need to
            > research.
            >
            > How much weight are you carrying over what kind of terrain? How far
            > do you plan to ride it? What kind of speeds are you looking for? How
            > much pedalling are you willing to do? These are variables that
            > require lots of homework before arriving at a decision.
            >
            > Cheap batteries are heavy. Expensive batteries are lighter but more
            > complicated.
            >
            > Water is an insidious menace.
            >
            > I can maintain a bicycle in everyday service for about $200 per year.
            > One ride in a rain storm could end up costing me $200 or more if
            > something gets wet and fries or welds itself.
            >
            > My original budget for buzzing le Bete was around a thousand dollars.
            > After researching the subject more fully, I'm expecting to spend that
            > on batteries and chargers alone.
            >
            > Having local support and/or knowing something about power electronics
            > would help sort it out for you. The bike shop closest to my home is
            > an internationally renowned supplier of e-bike conversion components.
            > <www.ebikes.ca>. The owner, a brilliant engineer, and great kid, is
            > presently riding his electrified Xtracycle across Canada on a $10
            > energy budget. He rigged up an articulated steering system and is
            > pedalling from a lawn chair attached to the SnapDeck.
            >
            > The choice I made for le Bete is a Crystalyte 5304 rear hub motor.
            > It's a torque monster in the e-bike world. A measly 48 volts with 18
            > amp hours is all the NiMh batteries I can afford but I'm quite
            > willing to pedal and not too excited about going more than 20 mph.
            > with regular bike brakes on a loaded X. My priorities are range and
            > reliability.
            >
            > You can check out the E-Zee kits they sell at ebikes.ca. Another
            > reputable and well designed bolt-on conversion is the Bionx system.
            >
          • Devian Gilbert
            so with all this said... i suppose one could speculate upon a demand for e-assist bicycle mechanics. pretty cool me thinks... perhaps something of a mix
            Message 5 of 13 , Aug 25, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              so with all this said...
              i suppose one could speculate upon a demand for e-assist bicycle mechanics.

              pretty cool
              me thinks... perhaps something of a mix between R/C stuff, and bicycles.

              very cool
              i suppose one could speculate upon a vision of a new industry, complete with schools, loans, and jobs.

              wow... very cool stuff.

              I'm beyond intrigued 

              d-
              "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the human race." H.G. Wells


              On Aug 25, 2008, at 7:13 PM, Morgan wrote:

              Zoot,
              These are great points. The number one is to try to find someone nearby,
              if possible, to service and support these. But the problem is, such folks
              are few and far between. We are one of the very few shops in the whole
              SouthEastern USA that can deal with electric bike components. Most
              bike shops won't touch it with a 10 foot pole. I think they are afraid of
              electricity or something (humorous side note, our shop's regular bike mechanic,
              a 6' tall Tattooed and pierced guy, was very scared of the big power supply
              I brought into the shop to hook up to motors and bikes for testing! I said
              "Come on, it only goes up to 70 volts - barely enough to kill you!" At one point
              I hooked it up to a bike, and there was an unrelated noise from something falling 
              off the shelf - he jumped about 5 feet!)

              Anyway, you are right - Ebikes.ca are great. We work with them a lot. (you may have seen
              the thread I started here about Justin's trip across Canada).

              But they are also very busy, and their goal (as ours) is to ultimately build up a dealer 
              network so that electric bikes and kits can be installed and serviced locally. It will take
              a long time to get to that point, due to the reluctance of regular bike shops
              with this stuff.

              In the meantime, the best customers can do is try to find an online whom they
              think will provide after-sales support, warranty, reasonable return policy, etc.
              If you are thinking of using a motor with an Xtracycle, it may be great to try to find
              someone who is experienced with that angle, too.

              Ebikes.ca is one of a few that fit that bill, but there are some others (one of our
              satisfied customers here just recommended us - he bought an eZee kit from us).

              Now, on pricing. There are a number of options that don't break the bank.
              Crystalyte motors are probably a bit higher quality than Wilderness Energy. I've
              heard of a lot of problems with the WE stuff. Originally we were going to be 
              a dealer, then decided not to. Even some of the Crystalyte stuff is a bit problematic -
              with the most reliable being their cheapest DC brushed motor. But that is fairly low
              power and torque, and less efficient than brushed. But it is possible to get a decent
              Crystalyte setup that won't break the bank, and should be reasonably reliable and
              long-lived. One of my family members uses a 406 Motor on an Xtracycle equipped
              bike, that has worked flawlessly.

              We also have a new line of hub motors for the "budget minded" on the way. Until
              we've done some testing of the first batch, I won't disclose more details. But anyone
              interested in being part of the beta test program can drop me a line. Note, that 
              being part of a beta test program means it might fail, break, catch fire (we hope not),
              etc. But the key to these motors is a higher torque at a lower price (but not
              very high speed).

              In the end the old adage is mostly true: you get what you pay for. I know Mark Garvey
              was super excited to get his lead acid batteries replaced by Batteries Plus for free.
              If he can do that for one or two more cycles, then he will be down around the cost per
              mile of buying a LiFEPO4 battery. But in general, barring a bunch of free replacements,
              cheaper batteries are actually more expensive in the long run. 

              That's not to say the expensive stuff is perfect. This is all still relatively new technology,
              and we've seen failures on everything from the cheapest stuff to the $1700 BionX stuff.
              Failures will occasionally happen. Then it comes back to: do you trust the seller to
              support you after you buy from him or her? If I was back in the shoes of being
              a customer, that is the primary question I would consider.

              Morgan 
              (from Cycle9.com)

              --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, "zoot_katz" <zootkatz@.. .> wrote:
              >
              > What's cheap? 
              > The Wilderness Energy kits are some of the least expensive out there 
              > but whether or not they'll meet your expectations is what you need to 
              > research. 
              > 
              > How much weight are you carrying over what kind of terrain? How far 
              > do you plan to ride it? What kind of speeds are you looking for? How 
              > much pedalling are you willing to do? These are variables that 
              > require lots of homework before arriving at a decision.
              > 
              > Cheap batteries are heavy. Expensive batteries are lighter but more 
              > complicated. 
              > 
              > Water is an insidious menace.
              > 
              > I can maintain a bicycle in everyday service for about $200 per year. 
              > One ride in a rain storm could end up costing me $200 or more if 
              > something gets wet and fries or welds itself. 
              > 
              > My original budget for buzzing le Bete was around a thousand dollars.
              > After researching the subject more fully, I'm expecting to spend that 
              > on batteries and chargers alone.
              > 
              > Having local support and/or knowing something about power electronics 
              > would help sort it out for you. The bike shop closest to my home is 
              > an internationally renowned supplier of e-bike conversion components. 
              > <www.ebikes. ca>. The owner, a brilliant engineer, and great kid, is 
              > presently riding his electrified Xtracycle across Canada on a $10 
              > energy budget. He rigged up an articulated steering system and is 
              > pedalling from a lawn chair attached to the SnapDeck.
              > 
              > The choice I made for le Bete is a Crystalyte 5304 rear hub motor. 
              > It's a torque monster in the e-bike world. A measly 48 volts with 18 
              > amp hours is all the NiMh batteries I can afford but I'm quite 
              > willing to pedal and not too excited about going more than 20 mph. 
              > with regular bike brakes on a loaded X. My priorities are range and 
              > reliability.
              > 
              > You can check out the E-Zee kits they sell at ebikes.ca. Another 
              > reputable and well designed bolt-on conversion is the Bionx system.
              >


            • Morgan
              As usual, you hit the nail right on the head. That is one of the reasons I am doing this. Because there aren t enough people who know how. I mean, there are
              Message 6 of 13 , Aug 25, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                As usual, you hit the nail right on the head.

                That is one of the reasons I am doing this. Because
                there aren't enough people who know how. I mean, there
                are quite a few scattered around, but those are mostly the
                hobbyists, not the folks who want to or can run a serious
                business that will support customers.

                Anyway, since I'm an educator, I figure my ultimate exit
                point from the game is when I can get enough
                other folks educated about this stuff that my skills aren't needed
                anymore.

                But, anyway, it would be a good career for someone looking for work,
                and with the appropriate background. Just to give you an example,
                since we opened, we've had at least 10 or so people just appear from
                out of the woodwork with old electric bikes in need of repair, that
                nobody else locally could. And that is without any advertising that we could
                do this kind of stuff.

                We also get inquiries from all over the internet, though often sending an
                old bike or kit across country for repair doesn't end up being economically
                sensible.

                There is demand out there, and as electric bikes/kits take off, it will only
                increase....

                Morgan



                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Devian Gilbert <asanacycles@...> wrote:
                >
                > so with all this said...
                > i suppose one could speculate upon a demand for e-assist bicycle
                > mechanics.
                >
                > pretty cool
                > me thinks... perhaps something of a mix between R/C stuff, and bicycles.
                >
                > very cool
                > i suppose one could speculate upon a vision of a new industry,
                > complete with schools, loans, and jobs.
                >
                > wow... very cool stuff.
                >
                > I'm beyond intrigued
                >
                > d-
                > "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the
                > human race." H.G. Wells
                > http://www.AsanaCycles.com
                >
              • njal555
                Hi Beth, I have the Wilderness energy BL-36 installed on my bike and have been riding this since May. (My FreeRadical was installed just one week ago.) This
                Message 7 of 13 , Aug 25, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Beth,

                  I have the Wilderness energy BL-36 installed on my bike and have been
                  riding this since May. (My FreeRadical was installed just one week ago.)

                  This kit seems to be available on-line for about $436. As I have
                  written before, installation of this kit is not for the faint of
                  heart, in my opinion. However, now that it is installed, I am quite
                  happy with it.

                  In my opinion, the deciding factor boils down to range. The W.E. kit
                  adds a lot of weight to your bike (maybe 35 pounds including battery).
                  Because of this, riding up any significant hills without electric
                  power will be difficult. So, if your typical "commute" can be
                  managed on one charge (or if hills can be avoided at the end of your
                  ride) then this kit works very well. On the other hand, if you expect
                  to run out of juice on a typical trip, then pushing around the extra
                  weight will definitely be a drag.

                  More expensive kits will weigh less and will also have a longer range.

                  By the way, charging your batteries as soon as possible after use is
                  recommended, especially for the SLA batteries that come with the BL-36
                  kit.

                  -Njal


                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "beth" <periwinklekog@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I've been enjoying all the hauling I've done on my X this spring and
                  summer.
                  > However, I live in a place with some hills and I'm thinking that
                  adding an E-assist unit to my
                  > X might not be a bad idea.
                  >
                  > I cannot afford a Stokemoney. At all, not now, not in the next year.
                  It's just too much money.
                  > That said, I'd like to hear recommendations for a cheaper unit,
                  something like a "starter" unit
                  > that would at least get me out the door, even if I had to recharge
                  it every day.
                  > Suggestions?
                  > thanks --Beth
                  >
                • kwikfile08
                  To follow up this thought. I want to say that the whole e-assist thing was completely foreign to me. I looked locally at a Bionx dealer here in So. Cal. which
                  Message 8 of 13 , Aug 25, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    To follow up this thought.
                    I want to say that the whole e-assist thing was completely foreign to me. I looked locally
                    at a Bionx dealer here in So. Cal. which I thought would have been nice because of
                    distance. But after a couple meetings I could see that it was not going to be good on
                    customer relationship for me.
                    So I went with Cycle9 and I am happy with my build. Yes there was a tech issue. But you
                    know what? Morgan and Elise do support their customers as if they were in the other
                    persons shoes. It is rare anymore in my experience that businesses care about customer
                    relationships. It is important to me especially at long distances. My experience has been as
                    if Cycle9 was my LBS right here in Anaheim.

                    Carl

                    eZee 36v 400w
                    48v 9Ah LiFePo4




                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Morgan" <mcgurme@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Zoot,
                    > These are great points. The number one is to try to find someone nearby,
                    > if possible, to service and support these. But the problem is, such folks
                    > are few and far between. We are one of the very few shops in the whole
                    > SouthEastern USA that can deal with electric bike components. Most
                    > bike shops won't touch it with a 10 foot pole. I think they are afraid of
                    > electricity or something (humorous side note, our shop's regular bike mechanic,
                    > a 6' tall Tattooed and pierced guy, was very scared of the big power supply
                    > I brought into the shop to hook up to motors and bikes for testing! I said
                    > "Come on, it only goes up to 70 volts - barely enough to kill you!" At one point
                    > I hooked it up to a bike, and there was an unrelated noise from something falling
                    > off the shelf - he jumped about 5 feet!)
                    >
                    > Anyway, you are right - Ebikes.ca are great. We work with them a lot. (you may have
                    seen
                    > the thread I started here about Justin's trip across Canada).
                    >
                    > But they are also very busy, and their goal (as ours) is to ultimately build up a dealer
                    > network so that electric bikes and kits can be installed and serviced locally. It will take
                    > a long time to get to that point, due to the reluctance of regular bike shops
                    > with this stuff.
                    >
                    > In the meantime, the best customers can do is try to find an online whom they
                    > think will provide after-sales support, warranty, reasonable return policy, etc.
                    > If you are thinking of using a motor with an Xtracycle, it may be great to try to find
                    > someone who is experienced with that angle, too.
                    >
                    > Ebikes.ca is one of a few that fit that bill, but there are some others (one of our
                    > satisfied customers here just recommended us - he bought an eZee kit from us).
                    >
                    > Now, on pricing. There are a number of options that don't break the bank.
                    > Crystalyte motors are probably a bit higher quality than Wilderness Energy. I've
                    > heard of a lot of problems with the WE stuff. Originally we were going to be
                    > a dealer, then decided not to. Even some of the Crystalyte stuff is a bit problematic -
                    > with the most reliable being their cheapest DC brushed motor. But that is fairly low
                    > power and torque, and less efficient than brushed. But it is possible to get a decent
                    > Crystalyte setup that won't break the bank, and should be reasonably reliable and
                    > long-lived. One of my family members uses a 406 Motor on an Xtracycle equipped
                    > bike, that has worked flawlessly.
                    >
                    > We also have a new line of hub motors for the "budget minded" on the way. Until
                    > we've done some testing of the first batch, I won't disclose more details. But anyone
                    > interested in being part of the beta test program can drop me a line. Note, that
                    > being part of a beta test program means it might fail, break, catch fire (we hope not),
                    > etc. But the key to these motors is a higher torque at a lower price (but not
                    > very high speed).
                    >
                    > In the end the old adage is mostly true: you get what you pay for. I know Mark Garvey
                    > was super excited to get his lead acid batteries replaced by Batteries Plus for free.
                    > If he can do that for one or two more cycles, then he will be down around the cost per
                    > mile of buying a LiFEPO4 battery. But in general, barring a bunch of free replacements,
                    > cheaper batteries are actually more expensive in the long run.
                    >
                    > That's not to say the expensive stuff is perfect. This is all still relatively new technology,
                    > and we've seen failures on everything from the cheapest stuff to the $1700 BionX stuff.
                    > Failures will occasionally happen. Then it comes back to: do you trust the seller to
                    > support you after you buy from him or her? If I was back in the shoes of being
                    > a customer, that is the primary question I would consider.
                    >
                    > Morgan
                    > (from Cycle9.com)
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "zoot_katz" <zootkatz@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > What's cheap?
                    > > The Wilderness Energy kits are some of the least expensive out there
                    > > but whether or not they'll meet your expectations is what you need to
                    > > research.
                    > >
                    > > How much weight are you carrying over what kind of terrain? How far
                    > > do you plan to ride it? What kind of speeds are you looking for? How
                    > > much pedalling are you willing to do? These are variables that
                    > > require lots of homework before arriving at a decision.
                    > >
                    > > Cheap batteries are heavy. Expensive batteries are lighter but more
                    > > complicated.
                    > >
                    > > Water is an insidious menace.
                    > >
                    > > I can maintain a bicycle in everyday service for about $200 per year.
                    > > One ride in a rain storm could end up costing me $200 or more if
                    > > something gets wet and fries or welds itself.
                    > >
                    > > My original budget for buzzing le Bete was around a thousand dollars.
                    > > After researching the subject more fully, I'm expecting to spend that
                    > > on batteries and chargers alone.
                    > >
                    > > Having local support and/or knowing something about power electronics
                    > > would help sort it out for you. The bike shop closest to my home is
                    > > an internationally renowned supplier of e-bike conversion components.
                    > > <www.ebikes.ca>. The owner, a brilliant engineer, and great kid, is
                    > > presently riding his electrified Xtracycle across Canada on a $10
                    > > energy budget. He rigged up an articulated steering system and is
                    > > pedalling from a lawn chair attached to the SnapDeck.
                    > >
                    > > The choice I made for le Bete is a Crystalyte 5304 rear hub motor.
                    > > It's a torque monster in the e-bike world. A measly 48 volts with 18
                    > > amp hours is all the NiMh batteries I can afford but I'm quite
                    > > willing to pedal and not too excited about going more than 20 mph.
                    > > with regular bike brakes on a loaded X. My priorities are range and
                    > > reliability.
                    > >
                    > > You can check out the E-Zee kits they sell at ebikes.ca. Another
                    > > reputable and well designed bolt-on conversion is the Bionx system.
                    > >
                    >
                  • zoot_katz
                    ... bicycles. ... There s a big cross over between the R/C folks and electic vehicles. The hands on experience of a electronic hobbyist would indeed be
                    Message 9 of 13 , Aug 26, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Devian Gilbert
                      <asanacycles@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > so with all this said...
                      > i suppose one could speculate upon a demand for e-assist bicycle
                      > mechanics.
                      >
                      > pretty cool
                      > me thinks... perhaps something of a mix between R/C stuff, and
                      bicycles.
                      >
                      > very cool
                      > i suppose one could speculate upon a vision of a new industry,
                      > complete with schools, loans, and jobs.
                      >
                      > wow... very cool stuff.
                      >
                      > I'm beyond intrigued
                      >
                      > d-

                      There's a big cross over between the R/C folks and electic vehicles.
                      The hands on experience of a electronic hobbyist would indeed be
                      valuable for a bicycle mechanic servicing e-bikes.

                      I envisioned fleets of electric assist cargo bikes sold with service
                      contracts.
                    • zoot_katz
                      ... nearby, ... such folks ... whole ... afraid of ... / ... lot. (you may have seen ... ultimately build up a dealer ... serviced locally. It will take ...
                      Message 10 of 13 , Aug 26, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Morgan" <mcgurme@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Zoot,
                        > These are great points. The number one is to try to find someone
                        nearby,
                        > if possible, to service and support these. But the problem is,
                        such folks
                        > are few and far between. We are one of the very few shops in the
                        whole
                        > SouthEastern USA that can deal with electric bike components. Most
                        > bike shops won't touch it with a 10 foot pole. I think they are
                        afraid of
                        > electricity or something
                        /

                        > Anyway, you are right - Ebikes.ca are great. We work with them a
                        lot. (you may have seen
                        > the thread I started here about Justin's trip across Canada).
                        >
                        > But they are also very busy, and their goal (as ours) is to
                        ultimately build up a dealer
                        > network so that electric bikes and kits can be installed and
                        serviced locally. It will take
                        > a long time to get to that point, due to the reluctance of regular
                        bike shops
                        > with this stuff.
                        >
                        > In the meantime, the best customers can do is try to find an online
                        whom they
                        > think will provide after-sales support, warranty, reasonable return
                        policy, etc.


                        Not only is there the fear of electricity there's the general
                        snobbery encountered in many bike shops. The electrified bicycle is
                        an affront to their purist instincts.

                        I've been following Justin's thread on endless-sphere.com.
                        His latest post was offering tech support in another thread for the
                        Cycle Analyst he designed.

                        That's customer service above and beyond what most sellers offer
                        considering it's from somewhere on the road a bit east of the middle
                        of Canada.

                        The shop will re-open before he gets back but the rest of the people
                        there needed a break. Business has been brisk. It's hard to keep
                        stock. With the Olympics over shipping from China will resume.
                      • Mark Garvey
                        ... HEH! well, I was exceited that I can get them replaced at least! I saved about $90 anyway! But in reality, you are quite correct. the better batteries
                        Message 11 of 13 , Aug 26, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment


                          On Mon, Aug 25, 2008 at 9:13 PM, Morgan <mcgurme@...> wrote:

                          In the end the old adage is mostly true: you get what you pay for.  I know Mark Garvey
                          was super excited to get his lead acid batteries replaced by Batteries Plus for free.


                          HEH!  well, I was exceited that I can get them replaced at least!  I saved about $90 anyway!  But in reality, you are quite correct.  the better batteries probably save you cash in the long run.  Unfortunately, since I have only short run cash, the SLAs work for me NOW.  They are user friendly and the charging is super simple.

                          On the other hand, they DO need replacing occasionally.  I use mine a LOT!  and have just finished my  solar charging station.  Good thing too, because my plug in charger went "Poof!" the other day!

                          mark
                        • kwikfile08
                          Mark, Being ignorant on all this stuff, I listened to different folks for advice and LiFePo4 batteries gave me the more bang for the buck. A little more up
                          Message 12 of 13 , Aug 26, 2008
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Mark,

                            Being ignorant on all this stuff, I listened to different folks for advice and LiFePo4 batteries
                            gave me the more bang for the buck. A little more up front but the charging is simple too.
                            It has really worked well. I got a charger at work and at home to avoid lugging one around.
                            Something Morgan mentioned and made sense, because lugging a charger around on
                            commutes would suck. I may take one with me if I travel deeper than my usual range
                            though. It was good you got yours replaced for free.


                            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Garvey" <lazybee45@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > On Mon, Aug 25, 2008 at 9:13 PM, Morgan <mcgurme@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > >
                            > > In the end the old adage is mostly true: you get what you pay for. I know
                            > > Mark Garvey
                            > > was super excited to get his lead acid batteries replaced by Batteries Plus
                            > > for free.
                            > >
                            >
                            >
                            > HEH! well, I was exceited that I can get them replaced at least! I saved
                            > about $90 anyway! But in reality, you are quite correct. the better
                            > batteries probably save you cash in the long run. Unfortunately, since I
                            > have only short run cash, the SLAs work for me NOW. They are user friendly
                            > and the charging is super simple.
                            >
                            > On the other hand, they DO need replacing occasionally. I use mine a LOT!
                            > and have just finished my solar charging station. Good thing too, because
                            > my plug in charger went "Poof!" the other day!
                            >
                            > mark
                            >
                          • Dane Buson
                            ... Have you thought about using an oversized (31.8) stem, and then using the 1 adapter shim in the wrong end of the for the handlebar? Granted, you ll need
                            Message 13 of 13 , Sep 3, 2008
                            • 0 Attachment
                              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, jimmy <mrjimmy55@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi, I'm new to this. Just got my Xtra yesterday. I looked around,
                              > but couldn't find some conclusive information on stoker stems. Does
                              > anyone know where I could find one that would fit my large (31.6mm)
                              > seat post?

                              Have you thought about using an oversized (31.8) stem, and then using
                              the 1" adapter shim in the 'wrong' end of the for the handlebar?
                              Granted, you'll need to buy an adjustable one so you can have a straight
                              (zero degree) angle. But I think it would work.

                              Example from nashbar for $40.

                              http://nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=24281

                              --
                              Dane Buson - Buson@...
                              You should emulate your heros, but don't carry it too far.
                              Especially if they are dead.
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.