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Handlebar recommendations?

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  • funkiplanet
    If any of you well seasoned riders might be able to give suggestions as to what kind of handle bars I should try on my X I d appreciate it. You can see my set
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 5 1:56 PM
      If any of you well seasoned riders might be able to give suggestions
      as to what kind of handle bars I should try on my X I'd appreciate it.

      You can see my set up at http://bike43.blogspot.com

      I'm pulling 55lbs in kid weight plus cargo and my hands aren't too
      happy.

      Thanks!
    • Sue Brown
      I love my Nitto Albatross steel handlebars. http://thevelvetfoghorn.com/?p=46 Sue http://xtrasue.com
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 5 2:02 PM
        I love my Nitto Albatross steel handlebars.



        Sue



        On Aug 5, 2008, at 1:56 PM, funkiplanet wrote:

        If any of you well seasoned riders might be able to give suggestions
        as to what kind of handle bars I should try on my X I'd appreciate it. 

        You can see my set up at http://bike43. blogspot. com

        I'm pulling 55lbs in kid weight plus cargo and my hands aren't too
        happy. 

        Thanks!


      • Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire
        I like Nitto Albatross bars a lot. Also the Nitto Promenade series give a comfortable and versatile ride. Anything that is swept back, with a grip area
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 5 2:05 PM
          I like Nitto Albatross bars a lot. Also the Nitto Promenade series
          give a comfortable and versatile ride.

          Anything that is swept back, with a grip area parallel to the line of
          travel, will reduce stress on your hands and also will help take some
          of the weight off your wrists.

          There are cheaper versions of these bars too (essentially "cruiser" or
          "three-speed" handlebars); Nitto's are particularly well designed, but
          the general shape and curve is the important part when it comes to
          comfort.

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "funkiplanet" <funkiplanet@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > If any of you well seasoned riders might be able to give suggestions
          > as to what kind of handle bars I should try on my X I'd appreciate it.
          >
          > You can see my set up at http://bike43.blogspot.com
          >
          > I'm pulling 55lbs in kid weight plus cargo and my hands aren't too
          > happy.
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
        • Drew
          I like the On One Mary bars. http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/14504-195_ONOMR5-43-Brands-362-On-One/On-One-Mary-Hanldebar.htm Not fully swept back. and
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 5 4:28 PM

            I like the On One "Mary" bars.
            http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/14504-195_ONOMR5-43-Brands-362-On-One/On-One-Mary-Hanldebar.htm

            Not fully swept back. and multiple positions for your hands.
            Also, looking at your setup, you might look into a stem shorter stem to bring your bars a little closer.
            An adjustable stem might be even better.
            http://wheelworld.com/itemdetails.cfm?ID=5337
            Just thoughts

            Love the kid speakers!

            Drew

            --- On Tue, 8/5/08, Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire <patrick@...> wrote:
            From: Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire <patrick@...>
            Subject: [rootsradicals] Re: Handlebar recommendations?
            To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, August 5, 2008, 2:05 PM

            I like Nitto Albatross bars a lot. Also the Nitto Promenade series
            give a comfortable and versatile ride.

            Anything that is swept back, with a grip area parallel to the line of
            travel, will reduce stress on your hands and also will help take some
            of the weight off your wrists.

            There are cheaper versions of these bars too (essentially "cruiser" or
            "three-speed" handlebars); Nitto's are particularly well designed, but
            the general shape and curve is the important part when it comes to
            comfort.

            --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, "funkiplanet" <funkiplanet@ ...>
            wrote:
            >
            > If any of you well seasoned riders might be able to give suggestions
            > as to what kind of handle bars I should try on my X I'd appreciate it.
            >
            > You can see my set up at http://bike43. blogspot. com
            >
            > I'm pulling 55lbs in kid weight plus cargo and my hands aren't too
            > happy.
            >
            > Thanks!
            >


          • murray
            We ve had this discussion several times before. Try searching the archives. There are lots of opinions there about handlebars, tires, seats etc etc etc.
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 5 4:30 PM
              We've had this discussion several times before. Try searching the
              archives. There are lots of opinions there about handlebars, tires,
              seats etc etc etc.

              On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 11:28 AM, Drew <shringara2@...> wrote:
              >
              > I like the On One "Mary" bars.
              > http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/14504-195_ONOMR5-43-Brands-362-On-One/On-One-Mary-Hanldebar.htm
              >
              > Not fully swept back. and multiple positions for your hands.
              > Also, looking at your setup, you might look into a stem shorter stem to
              > bring your bars a little closer.
              > An adjustable stem might be even better.
              > http://wheelworld.com/itemdetails.cfm?ID=5337
              > Just thoughts
              >
              > Love the kid speakers!
              >
              > Drew
              >
              > --- On Tue, 8/5/08, Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire <patrick@...>
              > wrote:
              >
              > From: Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire <patrick@...>
              > Subject: [rootsradicals] Re: Handlebar recommendations?
              > To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Tuesday, August 5, 2008, 2:05 PM
              >
              > I like Nitto Albatross bars a lot. Also the Nitto Promenade series
              > give a comfortable and versatile ride.
              >
              > Anything that is swept back, with a grip area parallel to the line of
              > travel, will reduce stress on your hands and also will help take some
              > of the weight off your wrists.
              >
              > There are cheaper versions of these bars too (essentially "cruiser" or
              > "three-speed" handlebars); Nitto's are particularly well designed, but
              > the general shape and curve is the important part when it comes to
              > comfort.
              >
              > --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, "funkiplanet" <funkiplanet@ ...>
              > wrote:
              >>
              >> If any of you well seasoned riders might be able to give suggestions
              >> as to what kind of handle bars I should try on my X I'd appreciate it.
              >>
              >> You can see my set up at http://bike43. blogspot. com
              >>
              >> I'm pulling 55lbs in kid weight plus cargo and my hands aren't too
              >> happy.
              >>
              >> Thanks!
              >>
              >
              >
              >
            • funkiplanet
              To all of you who responded, thank you so much for your input. I think I will check out some of your recommendations and maybe check into getting the stem
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 5 7:59 PM
                To all of you who responded, thank you so much for your input. I
                think I will check out some of your recommendations and maybe check
                into getting the stem moved.

                To murryneil - sorry to bother you, you grump.
              • murray
                Oh I didn t mean to sound grumpy. I was trying to be helpful. This list has a huge pile of great advice in the archives. On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 2:59 PM,
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 5 8:03 PM
                  Oh I didn't mean to sound grumpy. I was trying to be helpful. This
                  list has a huge pile of great advice in the archives.

                  On Wed, Aug 6, 2008 at 2:59 PM, funkiplanet
                  <funkiplanet@...> wrote:
                  > To all of you who responded, thank you so much for your input. I
                  > think I will check out some of your recommendations and maybe check
                  > into getting the stem moved.
                  >
                  > To murryneil - sorry to bother you, you grump.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Tone@moon-shine.net
                  Funkiplanet, I highly recommend the Trekking ATB/Hybrid handlebars Nashbar sells:
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 6 8:57 AM
                    Funkiplanet,

                    I highly recommend the Trekking ATB/Hybrid handlebars Nashbar sells:
                    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=600092&subcategory=60001049&brand=&sku=9756&storetype=&estoreid=&pagename=Shop%20by%20Subcat%3A%20ATB%20Handlebars

                    Right now they seem to be priced at $23, but I got mine for under $15
                    when they were having a sale.

                    I like these bars a great deal because they offer so many varied hand
                    positions. It is also a nice wide handlebar, which is good for
                    stability when carrying a load as well as for climbing hills. For
                    those of you, who do not know, wider bars are preferable when climbing
                    hills because they allow your chest to expand. That helps you breathe
                    without as much restriction as when having your hands closer together
                    on a handlebar, especially when pedaling harder out of the saddle to
                    get that extra push up the inclines when more weight is on your arms &
                    chest.

                    The Nashbar trekking bars are a bit unusual because the straight ends
                    of the bars are meant to be mounted closer to the rider, which means
                    brake or shifting mounts would be mounted at the ends rather than by
                    the headset connection.
                    When I set up my bike with these I actually reversed it, so the ends
                    are farther from me. It was a bit of a pain to slide on my
                    brake/shifter mounts, but they managed to get on. Fortunately, I only
                    use a front derailleur and I have a combo brake/shifter mount in one.
                    I have a couple of reasons for mounting these bars in reverse. My
                    primary reason is so that I can slide my forearms into the curls of
                    the handlebars to provide me with a hands-free lean-forward
                    more-aerodynamic position. The way I pull this off is I wrap my bars
                    with foam tubing to cushion my forearms/elbows.
                    At first I used those foam pool noodles. Those were extra-cushiony,
                    but all the bright neon colors available made the bike look like a joke.
                    These days I use gray or black foam pipe insulation from Home Depot.
                    You can buy six or eight feet of it for a buck, so you can not beat
                    the price. Just make sure you get the fully-wrapping sealed foam
                    tubing. A lot of the foam tubing comes with slits or partial slits
                    down their lengths, but the full-slit tubing will not slide onto the
                    handlebar's curves properly and will just slip/pop off. In fact, I
                    tried using the partial-slit tubing from Lowes and apparently the
                    stress of sliding the tubing around the curves tends to rip the
                    partial slit apart. I have not had that splitting issue occur with the
                    partial-slit tubing from Home Depot yet.
                    Make sure to get the tubing sized for 1/2" pipe because the foam
                    tubing will stretch and fit more snuggly around the wider handlebars.
                    You will also definitely want to slide on a very generous amount of
                    excess foam tubing length over each of the handlebar ends because over
                    time the foam will shift during use and compact itself, which results
                    in its length becoming shorter. That might expose your handlebars
                    underneath, so having extra tubing slid on should alleviate that
                    problem.
                    Keep in mind a handlebar end-cap of some sort may very well be
                    necessary to keep the tubing from sliding off. I actually have two
                    mini-mag light mounts on the ends of my trekking handlebars. These
                    keep the foam tubing from sliding off and if necessary I can just
                    slide in two mini-mag lights to act as headlights at night. This is a
                    great set up for camping too, because once you ride somewhere, then
                    you can just slip out your two mini-mag lights to use at your campsite.

                    Hope that helps or at least gives some people some ideas. :)
                    Ride safe,
                    _TONE_
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