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Re: [rootsradicals] changing tires with an gear hub

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  • Dave Lloyd
    Don t forget that Bakfiets cargo bikes use a Nexus hub in the back, and those are rated for at least the same load as an X. Maybe Todd F. will weigh in here to
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2008
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      Don't forget that Bakfiets cargo bikes use a Nexus hub in the back,
      and those are rated for at least the same load as an X. Maybe Todd F.
      will weigh in here to give some semi-long term reliability data.

      For my sample of N=1, the Nexus rear hub on my Trek L200 has been rock
      solid reliable over the last year. The only things I've had to do is
      twiddle the non-drive side cone and disassemble the cassette joint to
      clean out some winter time grit and shoot in some dry lube. The
      non-drive cone was just 'cos I'm picky. An adjustment here and there
      have been all it's needed, and that adjustment is fiddling the barrel
      adjuster on the shifter until the two yellow lines line up.

      Removing the rear wheel can, at first, be confusing but once you've
      done it, it's not so hard. I'll add needle nose pliers to the list of
      recommend tools since they make it easier to get the housing out of
      the cassette joint as well as removing the nutted end of the shifter
      cable from the cassette joint.

      My rear wheel also has a roller brake on it, which also needs to have
      the fixing arm on the chainstay removed as well as removing the cable
      from the roller brake arm. That takes an extra minute or two and it
      is a bit of a pain trying to weasel an adjustable wrench between the
      chainstay and wheel while unscrewing the bolt for the fixing arm, but
      it's not horrible.

      It seems to me that in the grand scheme of things that removing all of
      your carefully packed load to fix a flat would take far more time than
      the few extra minutes of removing the rear wheel of the Nexus and the
      Nexus gives you a nearly maintenance free drivetrain. Besides, if
      you're that worried about flats, that's why they have Kevlar lined
      tires.

      Eagerly awaiting an X (maybe by the 15th!),

      --
      --dlloyd
    • Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire
      remember that you can also fix many flats without removing the tube from the tire, or the wheel from the bike.
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 2, 2008
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        remember that you can also fix many flats without removing the tube
        from the tire, or the wheel from the bike.


        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Lloyd" <dave@...> wrote:
        >
        > Don't forget that Bakfiets cargo bikes use a Nexus hub in the back,
        > and those are rated for at least the same load as an X. Maybe Todd F.
        > will weigh in here to give some semi-long term reliability data.
        >
        > For my sample of N=1, the Nexus rear hub on my Trek L200 has been rock
        > solid reliable over the last year. The only things I've had to do is
        > twiddle the non-drive side cone and disassemble the cassette joint to
        > clean out some winter time grit and shoot in some dry lube. The
        > non-drive cone was just 'cos I'm picky. An adjustment here and there
        > have been all it's needed, and that adjustment is fiddling the barrel
        > adjuster on the shifter until the two yellow lines line up.
        >
        > Removing the rear wheel can, at first, be confusing but once you've
        > done it, it's not so hard. I'll add needle nose pliers to the list of
        > recommend tools since they make it easier to get the housing out of
        > the cassette joint as well as removing the nutted end of the shifter
        > cable from the cassette joint.
        >
        > My rear wheel also has a roller brake on it, which also needs to have
        > the fixing arm on the chainstay removed as well as removing the cable
        > from the roller brake arm. That takes an extra minute or two and it
        > is a bit of a pain trying to weasel an adjustable wrench between the
        > chainstay and wheel while unscrewing the bolt for the fixing arm, but
        > it's not horrible.
        >
        > It seems to me that in the grand scheme of things that removing all of
        > your carefully packed load to fix a flat would take far more time than
        > the few extra minutes of removing the rear wheel of the Nexus and the
        > Nexus gives you a nearly maintenance free drivetrain. Besides, if
        > you're that worried about flats, that's why they have Kevlar lined
        > tires.
        >
        > Eagerly awaiting an X (maybe by the 15th!),
        >
        > --
        > --dlloyd
        >
      • Dave Lloyd
        On Sat, Aug 2, 2008 at 6:28 PM, Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire ... I ve received two flats over the last year (Schwalbe Silento II, Schwalbe Marathon and
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 3, 2008
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          On Sat, Aug 2, 2008 at 6:28 PM, Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire
          <patrick@...> wrote:
          > remember that you can also fix many flats without removing the tube
          > from the tire, or the wheel from the bike.

          I've received two flats over the last year (Schwalbe Silento II,
          Schwalbe Marathon and Schwalbe Marathon Winter). One was from a
          roofing nail which was easy to find from the rhythmic tic-tic-tic and
          the big freakin' nail sticking out of my front tire. The other was
          when my rear tire, Schwalbe Silento II, decided that it had enough and
          tore for about two inches right at the bead. Even the cheap Schwalbes
          that came with my Trek L200 (Silento II) would roll just fine through
          broken glass, wires, potholes, etc. that pockmark my route across St.
          Louis.

          So the bottom line is that if you don't like flats, get some Schwalbes.

          --
          --dlloyd
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