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changing tires with an gear hub

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  • Tony Berger
    I have seen several posts that it is difficult to change the tire on a gear driven hub (shimano nexus and the like) and that we shouldn t be hauling heavy
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2008
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      I have seen several posts that it is difficult to change the tire on a gear driven hub (shimano nexus and the like) and that we shouldn't be hauling heavy loads.
       
      Well, we just raced my Xtra in the Riverwest24 (www.riverwest24.com) last weekend and we had a flat at about 6:30AM.  We were back on the road by 7 and I am by no means a bike mechanic!  The tire change is no more difficult that any other bike I have ever owned and you DO NOT need a quick release cable either.  You need a 2MM hex tool, a flat blade and a 15 MM wrench.
       
      Stick the 2MM hex into the tiny hole on the Nexus and turn counter clockwise.  This will loosen the cable enough to easily remove it with a flat blade or if you are strong a easy pull.  From there remove your wheel and change the tube just as you would any other bike.  It couldn't be easier.
       
      As a side note, the Nexus is about a million times easier to adjust then typical geared bikes.  Just a quick turn on the adjustment cable and you are back in tune in seconds with no tools required.  The added bonus of not having such a long chain on my Xtra just makes me that much happier.
       
      Not sure about how much too heavy of a load is for these but I have carried a 225 pound guy around the block and we did do a 5 mile lap of the race with two people (total weight on the bike was probably about 350 pounds) and didn't have any issues either.
       
      I think most of North America is way behind technology when it comes to internal geared hubs.  These things just RULE.  I have the Shimano Red Line.  It was a little expensive and a little heaver than standard wheels but I think the trade off of virtually no maintenance is well worth it.  My Xtra is about 48  pounds but still has no problem keeping up 15MPH with a load on the back.
       
      Check the bike shop for one and take it for a spin.  I think you will be amazed.
       
      Cheers, I'm off to ride my Xtra, it's a beautiful day in Milwaukee!
       
      Tony B.

    • Dave Lloyd
      Don t forget that Bakfiets cargo bikes use a Nexus hub in the back, and those are rated for at least the same load as an X. Maybe Todd F. will weigh in here to
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 2, 2008
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        Don't forget that Bakfiets cargo bikes use a Nexus hub in the back,
        and those are rated for at least the same load as an X. Maybe Todd F.
        will weigh in here to give some semi-long term reliability data.

        For my sample of N=1, the Nexus rear hub on my Trek L200 has been rock
        solid reliable over the last year. The only things I've had to do is
        twiddle the non-drive side cone and disassemble the cassette joint to
        clean out some winter time grit and shoot in some dry lube. The
        non-drive cone was just 'cos I'm picky. An adjustment here and there
        have been all it's needed, and that adjustment is fiddling the barrel
        adjuster on the shifter until the two yellow lines line up.

        Removing the rear wheel can, at first, be confusing but once you've
        done it, it's not so hard. I'll add needle nose pliers to the list of
        recommend tools since they make it easier to get the housing out of
        the cassette joint as well as removing the nutted end of the shifter
        cable from the cassette joint.

        My rear wheel also has a roller brake on it, which also needs to have
        the fixing arm on the chainstay removed as well as removing the cable
        from the roller brake arm. That takes an extra minute or two and it
        is a bit of a pain trying to weasel an adjustable wrench between the
        chainstay and wheel while unscrewing the bolt for the fixing arm, but
        it's not horrible.

        It seems to me that in the grand scheme of things that removing all of
        your carefully packed load to fix a flat would take far more time than
        the few extra minutes of removing the rear wheel of the Nexus and the
        Nexus gives you a nearly maintenance free drivetrain. Besides, if
        you're that worried about flats, that's why they have Kevlar lined
        tires.

        Eagerly awaiting an X (maybe by the 15th!),

        --
        --dlloyd
      • Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire
        remember that you can also fix many flats without removing the tube from the tire, or the wheel from the bike.
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 2, 2008
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          remember that you can also fix many flats without removing the tube
          from the tire, or the wheel from the bike.


          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Lloyd" <dave@...> wrote:
          >
          > Don't forget that Bakfiets cargo bikes use a Nexus hub in the back,
          > and those are rated for at least the same load as an X. Maybe Todd F.
          > will weigh in here to give some semi-long term reliability data.
          >
          > For my sample of N=1, the Nexus rear hub on my Trek L200 has been rock
          > solid reliable over the last year. The only things I've had to do is
          > twiddle the non-drive side cone and disassemble the cassette joint to
          > clean out some winter time grit and shoot in some dry lube. The
          > non-drive cone was just 'cos I'm picky. An adjustment here and there
          > have been all it's needed, and that adjustment is fiddling the barrel
          > adjuster on the shifter until the two yellow lines line up.
          >
          > Removing the rear wheel can, at first, be confusing but once you've
          > done it, it's not so hard. I'll add needle nose pliers to the list of
          > recommend tools since they make it easier to get the housing out of
          > the cassette joint as well as removing the nutted end of the shifter
          > cable from the cassette joint.
          >
          > My rear wheel also has a roller brake on it, which also needs to have
          > the fixing arm on the chainstay removed as well as removing the cable
          > from the roller brake arm. That takes an extra minute or two and it
          > is a bit of a pain trying to weasel an adjustable wrench between the
          > chainstay and wheel while unscrewing the bolt for the fixing arm, but
          > it's not horrible.
          >
          > It seems to me that in the grand scheme of things that removing all of
          > your carefully packed load to fix a flat would take far more time than
          > the few extra minutes of removing the rear wheel of the Nexus and the
          > Nexus gives you a nearly maintenance free drivetrain. Besides, if
          > you're that worried about flats, that's why they have Kevlar lined
          > tires.
          >
          > Eagerly awaiting an X (maybe by the 15th!),
          >
          > --
          > --dlloyd
          >
        • Dave Lloyd
          On Sat, Aug 2, 2008 at 6:28 PM, Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire ... I ve received two flats over the last year (Schwalbe Silento II, Schwalbe Marathon and
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 3, 2008
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            On Sat, Aug 2, 2008 at 6:28 PM, Patrick Barber/Holly McGuire
            <patrick@...> wrote:
            > remember that you can also fix many flats without removing the tube
            > from the tire, or the wheel from the bike.

            I've received two flats over the last year (Schwalbe Silento II,
            Schwalbe Marathon and Schwalbe Marathon Winter). One was from a
            roofing nail which was easy to find from the rhythmic tic-tic-tic and
            the big freakin' nail sticking out of my front tire. The other was
            when my rear tire, Schwalbe Silento II, decided that it had enough and
            tore for about two inches right at the bead. Even the cheap Schwalbes
            that came with my Trek L200 (Silento II) would roll just fine through
            broken glass, wires, potholes, etc. that pockmark my route across St.
            Louis.

            So the bottom line is that if you don't like flats, get some Schwalbes.

            --
            --dlloyd
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