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rim suggestions?

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  • pystanis
    my lbs has placed an order for a big dummy frame hope to hear some suggestions on mtb rims sturdy common (so replacement is easy if necessary) easy to replace
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 29, 2008
      my lbs has placed an order for a big dummy frame
      hope to hear some suggestions on mtb rims

      sturdy
      common (so replacement is easy if necessary)
      easy to replace spokes? I assume the hub is a
      factor

      probably 26 x 2.0 mtb tires
      seems every bike shop has them, inexpensive but am
      wondering about the ride

      thanks
    • Tone@moon-shine.net
      pystanis, I do not know what your budget is like, but I REALLY like to use Aerospoke rims (www.aerospoke.com). They are NOT cheap! Depending on what size or
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 30, 2008
        pystanis,

        I do not know what your budget is like, but I REALLY like to use
        Aerospoke rims (www.aerospoke.com). They are NOT cheap! Depending on
        what size or brake-version you buy they can cost almost as much as a
        grand for a front and rear combo set.
        Aerospokes are actually a poly-carbon fiber wheel & hub system, which
        have five thick rigid "spokes". They never need truing, and you never
        have to replace a spoke unless you have a major accident where the
        entire rim breaks or something. Fortunately the Aerospoke company
        usually will replace even a broken wheel at a significant discount in
        such circumstances.
        Aerospoke wheels are also very strong... I do not know if you have
        ever seen some of the loads I carry
        (http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/lunarload-angle.jpg), but I have never
        had a problem with my Aerospoke wheels handling a load. Also, I
        suspect I probably experience less flex compared to most Xtracycle
        owners because my wheels are rigid.
        I also like Aerospokes because whenever I lock up my bike (as seen in
        the photo link above) I lock my big chain through my bike's frame and
        the front wheel. Therefore it is much easier for me to slip the chain
        through the wide gap between two of the five carbon-fiber spokes
        compared to two standard metal spokes.
        If you do end up investing in Aerospokes I highly recommend opting for
        the more expensive disc-brake version. That is because over time a
        typical brake pad might actually wear down your rim, especially if you
        ride in dusty, gritty, and wet conditions, etc. The last thing you
        want to have happen is have an expensive Aerospoke wheel have its rim
        wear down from braking to the point of a blow out. With disc-brakes
        you will never ever have to worry about your Aerospoke rims wearing
        out. Ever since I upgraded to disc brake Aerospoke wheels a number of
        years ago I have never had any problems.
        In my opinion they are well worth the expense... no truing or spoke
        replacements, major low maintenance, strong, long lasting, and they
        simply look pretty darn cool too. :)
        Ride safe,
        _TONE_
      • jonf.rm
        I can also vouch for the Aerospokes, although not on my soon-to-arrive Dummy. We use them on our tandem, and I m not a small guy. I d say that fully loaded
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 30, 2008
          I can also vouch for the Aerospokes, although not on my soon-to-arrive
          Dummy. We use them on our tandem, and I'm not a small guy. I'd say
          that fully loaded with me, stoker and gear is pushing almost 600 pounds.

          They are a little "extreme" for my tastes, which run towards the
          "classic" lugged steel bikes, but I can't complain about their
          performance or their strength.

          Jon

          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Tone@... wrote:
          >
          > pystanis,
          >
          > I do not know what your budget is like, but I REALLY like to use
          > Aerospoke rims (www.aerospoke.com). They are NOT cheap! Depending on
          > what size or brake-version you buy they can cost almost as much as a
          > grand for a front and rear combo set.
          > Aerospokes are actually a poly-carbon fiber wheel & hub system, which
          > have five thick rigid "spokes". They never need truing, and you never
          > have to replace a spoke unless you have a major accident where the
          > entire rim breaks or something. Fortunately the Aerospoke company
          > usually will replace even a broken wheel at a significant discount in
          > such circumstances.
          > Aerospoke wheels are also very strong... I do not know if you have
          > ever seen some of the loads I carry
          > (http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/lunarload-angle.jpg), but I have never
          > had a problem with my Aerospoke wheels handling a load. Also, I
          > suspect I probably experience less flex compared to most Xtracycle
          > owners because my wheels are rigid.
          > I also like Aerospokes because whenever I lock up my bike (as seen in
          > the photo link above) I lock my big chain through my bike's frame and
          > the front wheel. Therefore it is much easier for me to slip the chain
          > through the wide gap between two of the five carbon-fiber spokes
          > compared to two standard metal spokes.
          > If you do end up investing in Aerospokes I highly recommend opting for
          > the more expensive disc-brake version. That is because over time a
          > typical brake pad might actually wear down your rim, especially if you
          > ride in dusty, gritty, and wet conditions, etc. The last thing you
          > want to have happen is have an expensive Aerospoke wheel have its rim
          > wear down from braking to the point of a blow out. With disc-brakes
          > you will never ever have to worry about your Aerospoke rims wearing
          > out. Ever since I upgraded to disc brake Aerospoke wheels a number of
          > years ago I have never had any problems.
          > In my opinion they are well worth the expense... no truing or spoke
          > replacements, major low maintenance, strong, long lasting, and they
          > simply look pretty darn cool too. :)
          > Ride safe,
          > _TONE_
          >
        • pystanis
          wow, looked at the jpg of the bike carrying a load of 2x4, 4x4, and 4x8 sheet of plywood and etc. very impressive. Basic plan is to use the big dummy for
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 30, 2008
            wow, looked at the jpg of the bike carrying a load of
            2x4, 4x4, and 4x8 sheet of plywood and etc. very impressive.

            Basic plan is to use the big dummy for camping with some
            off road. Gearing for steep mountain climbs in the california
            mountains.

            Using standard (whatever that means) mtb components should
            make parts replacement less troublesome.
            Worst case scenario would be buying a beater mt bike and scavenging
            the parts for repairs.

            Hopefully a less expensive build will not be as attractive to
            poachers.




            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Tone@... wrote:
            >
            > pystanis,
            >
            > I do not know what your budget is like, but I REALLY like to use
            > Aerospoke rims (www.aerospoke.com). They are NOT cheap! Depending on
            > what size or brake-version you buy they can cost almost as much as a
            > grand for a front and rear combo set.
            > Aerospokes are actually a poly-carbon fiber wheel & hub system, which
            > have five thick rigid "spokes". They never need truing, and you never
            > have to replace a spoke unless you have a major accident where the
            > entire rim breaks or something. Fortunately the Aerospoke company
            > usually will replace even a broken wheel at a significant discount in
            > such circumstances.
            > Aerospoke wheels are also very strong... I do not know if you have
            > ever seen some of the loads I carry
            > (http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/lunarload-angle.jpg), but I have never
            > had a problem with my Aerospoke wheels handling a load. Also, I
            > suspect I probably experience less flex compared to most Xtracycle
            > owners because my wheels are rigid.
            > I also like Aerospokes because whenever I lock up my bike (as seen in
            > the photo link above) I lock my big chain through my bike's frame and
            > the front wheel. Therefore it is much easier for me to slip the chain
            > through the wide gap between two of the five carbon-fiber spokes
            > compared to two standard metal spokes.
            > If you do end up investing in Aerospokes I highly recommend opting for
            > the more expensive disc-brake version. That is because over time a
            > typical brake pad might actually wear down your rim, especially if you
            > ride in dusty, gritty, and wet conditions, etc. The last thing you
            > want to have happen is have an expensive Aerospoke wheel have its rim
            > wear down from braking to the point of a blow out. With disc-brakes
            > you will never ever have to worry about your Aerospoke rims wearing
            > out. Ever since I upgraded to disc brake Aerospoke wheels a number of
            > years ago I have never had any problems.
            > In my opinion they are well worth the expense... no truing or spoke
            > replacements, major low maintenance, strong, long lasting, and they
            > simply look pretty darn cool too. :)
            > Ride safe,
            > _TONE_
            >
          • Devian Gilbert
            if you haven t already found: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=391518 at the moment I am using WTB LaserDisc DH rims laced 4 cross, 36 hole, brass
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 30, 2008
              if you haven't already found:

              at the moment I am using WTB LaserDisc DH rims
              laced 4 cross, 36 hole, brass nipples.  

              i've been using that wheelset for a few weeks, and I've been using a set of 2.5" Kenda DH Short Tracker tyres front and rear.

              peace...d

              "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the human race." H.G. Wells


              On Jul 30, 2008, at 7:48 PM, pystanis wrote:


              wow, looked at the jpg of the bike carrying a load of
              2x4, 4x4, and 4x8 sheet of plywood and etc. very impressive. 

              Basic plan is to use the big dummy for camping with some
              off road. Gearing for steep mountain climbs in the california
              mountains.

              Using standard (whatever that means) mtb components should 
              make parts replacement less troublesome.
              Worst case scenario would be buying a beater mt bike and scavenging
              the parts for repairs. 

              Hopefully a less expensive build will not be as attractive to
              poachers.

              --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, Tone@... wrote:
              >
              > pystanis,
              > 
              > I do not know what your budget is like, but I REALLY like to use 
              > Aerospoke rims (www.aerospoke. com). They are NOT cheap! Depending on 
              > what size or brake-version you buy they can cost almost as much as a 
              > grand for a front and rear combo set.
              > Aerospokes are actually a poly-carbon fiber wheel & hub system, which 
              > have five thick rigid "spokes". They never need truing, and you never 
              > have to replace a spoke unless you have a major accident where the 
              > entire rim breaks or something. Fortunately the Aerospoke company 
              > usually will replace even a broken wheel at a significant discount in 
              > such circumstances.
              > Aerospoke wheels are also very strong... I do not know if you have 
              > ever seen some of the loads I carry 
              > (http://www.moon- shine.net/ xs/lunarload- angle.jpg), but I have never 
              > had a problem with my Aerospoke wheels handling a load. Also, I 
              > suspect I probably experience less flex compared to most Xtracycle 
              > owners because my wheels are rigid.
              > I also like Aerospokes because whenever I lock up my bike (as seen in 
              > the photo link above) I lock my big chain through my bike's frame and 
              > the front wheel. Therefore it is much easier for me to slip the chain 
              > through the wide gap between two of the five carbon-fiber spokes 
              > compared to two standard metal spokes.
              > If you do end up investing in Aerospokes I highly recommend opting for 
              > the more expensive disc-brake version. That is because over time a 
              > typical brake pad might actually wear down your rim, especially if you 
              > ride in dusty, gritty, and wet conditions, etc. The last thing you 
              > want to have happen is have an expensive Aerospoke wheel have its rim 
              > wear down from braking to the point of a blow out. With disc-brakes 
              > you will never ever have to worry about your Aerospoke rims wearing 
              > out. Ever since I upgraded to disc brake Aerospoke wheels a number of 
              > years ago I have never had any problems.
              > In my opinion they are well worth the expense... no truing or spoke 
              > replacements, major low maintenance, strong, long lasting, and they 
              > simply look pretty darn cool too. :)
              > Ride safe,
              > _TONE_
              >


            • Tim Lupfer
              I like the sun mtx33. it s welded, eyeleted, and much wider than your average mountain bike rim at 33mm, so it works well with fat tires and heavy loads. -tim
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 31, 2008
                I like the sun mtx33. it's welded, eyeleted, and much wider than your
                average mountain bike rim at 33mm, so it works well with fat tires and
                heavy loads.
                -tim

                On Tue, Jul 29, 2008 at 9:07 AM, pystanis <pystanis@...> wrote:
                >
                > my lbs has placed an order for a big dummy frame
                > hope to hear some suggestions on mtb rims
                >
                > sturdy
                > common (so replacement is easy if necessary)
                > easy to replace spokes? I assume the hub is a
                > factor
                >
                > probably 26 x 2.0 mtb tires
                > seems every bike shop has them, inexpensive but am
                > wondering about the ride
                >
                > thanks
              • Robert J. Matter
                ... Sun Rhyno Lites. Bob Clydesdale Matter
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 1, 2008
                  pystanis wrote:

                  > my lbs has placed an order for a big dummy frame
                  > hope to hear some suggestions on mtb rims
                  >
                  > sturdy
                  > common (so replacement is easy if necessary)
                  > easy to replace spokes? I assume the hub is a
                  > factor
                  >
                  > probably 26 x 2.0 mtb tires
                  > seems every bike shop has them, inexpensive but am
                  > wondering about the ride
                  >
                  > thanks

                  Sun Rhyno Lites.

                  Bob "Clydesdale" Matter
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