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Re: [rootsradicals] Re: New Member, An Introduction :p

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  • D.D.Jackson
    Thanks for the welcome, Carl. What part of Cali you in? I lived in Manhattan Beach and Lake Arrowhead for a few years. David
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 2 9:38 AM
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      Thanks for the welcome, Carl.

      What part of Cali you in? I lived in Manhattan Beach and Lake Arrowhead for a few years.

      David

      On Mon, Jun 2, 2008 at 8:23 AM, kwikfile08 <kwikfile08@...> wrote:
      I like you already! You will like it here for sure. Old farts are cool people, hell everyone is
      cool people. In this blog is a wealth of knowledge and fun. Keep reading and posting. I
      enjoy the way you write. The part about getting ticketed was pretty funny.

        The beer and soft drinks are in the fridge, the ball game is on and the BBQ is almost
      ready. So relax and chill with the Roots!

      Peace,

      Carl from California


      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, D.D.Jackson <ddjackso@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hey, Everyone.
      >
      > About 45 years ago, a friend of mine and I bought (arguably) the first
      > Schwin 10-speeds sold in the New Orleans area. They had to be special
      > ordered. The owner of the lawn mower shop --- that also carried a few bikes
      > as a sideline (The larger of the two sources of bikes in the city at the
      > time) --- had no idea what we were asking for and had to look them up in the
      > Schwin catalog. Change happens.
      >
      > Our first 'real' ride was 90 miles south to the end of the road at the Gulf
      > of Mexico....yeah, tha asphalt just stopped at the edge of the marsh. Not
      > even a road block of any kind. We started out at 2am, maybe 3. Lights?
      > Oooops... We did have reflectors in back though.
      >
      > Got stopped by the police who wanted to know what in the hell we were doing.
      > They ticketed us for riding bicycles on the highway and told us we had to
      > ride the rest of the way on the loose clamshells along the side of the road.
      > That lasted for about 10 feet. Never saw the cops again, luckily. We made it
      > there and back, the start of a long series of biking adventures.
      >
      > Now I'm just a fat old fart who wants to be able to ride my two dogs to the
      > coffee shop with me. Not all that radical either, but wtf.
      >
      > Just discovered the Xtracycle this morning and from there found other 'cargo
      > biking' resources. Saw some great bikes on flickr too.
      >
      > Ya'll drop a note.
      > David
      >




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    • D.D.Jackson
      Hey, Neighbor. Good to know there s at least one other person on here living in this natural steam bath. If it gets any hotter, and we both know it will, my
      Message 2 of 21 , Jun 2 9:44 AM
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        Hey, Neighbor.

        Good to know there's at least one other person on here living in this natural steam bath. If it gets any hotter, and we both know it will, my enthusiasm for bike riding may taper off a bit till next October. I couldn't evacuate for a hurricane on a Big Dummy anyway....there too many other big dummies on the road then. But I don't evacuate anyway, really.

        David

        On Mon, Jun 2, 2008 at 8:39 AM, M.E. Martin <xibilba931@...> wrote:
        Hey David!

        Welcome to the roots radical world! I usually lurk and lust (after the Big Dummy, and, yes, that's a bike) but will become more vocal soon. I'm up river in Baton Rouge, 54 years old, and having the time of my life.

        We certainly know the 'summer is hell' feeling; nothing like an afternoon rain storm when it's already 95 degrees. The air along the River is so saturated with moisture before it rains that after it rains water doesn't so much evaporate as hover in an almost-fog from the ground to about 10 feet up. As long as one is moving it's not so bad but as soon as one stops, get out the towels.

        As I was born and raised in Florida I'd rather be hot than cold; I was 19 before I saw ice outside of a glass. I am amazed to read about how y'all ride in winter weather.

        Peace,

        Mark M






      • M.E. Martin
        Howdy hey, Once they get their collective butts in gear, the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) is going to instigate a study to pave the levee from NOLA to BRLA,
        Message 3 of 21 , Jun 2 11:31 AM
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          Howdy hey,

          Once they get their collective butts in gear, the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) is going to instigate a study to pave the levee from NOLA to BRLA, something like 110 miles along the River. It would make for a great ride whether trying to outrun a hurricane or just taking a ride. I hope they get it together this year; I know we're working on it from this end and we've got a few friends (okay, 2 friends) in the state legislature who want to see it done.

          Of course, as soon as they say, "Get the hell out! Hurricane comin'!" there will be all kinds of vehicles up there trying to get out. The good thing is, even a Big Dummy could make it through the jam and get to high ground if need be.

          Mark M


          To: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
          From: ddjackso@...
          Date: Mon, 2 Jun 2008 11:44:41 -0500
          Subject: Re: [rootsradicals] New Member, An Introduction :p

          Hey, Neighbor.

          Good to know there's at least one other person on here living in this natural steam bath. If it gets any hotter, and we both know it will, my enthusiasm for bike riding may taper off a bit till next October. I couldn't evacuate for a hurricane on a Big Dummy anyway....there too many other big dummies on the road then. But I don't evacuate anyway, really.

          David


          On Mon, Jun 2, 2008 at 8:39 AM, M.E. Martin <xibilba931@hotmail. com> wrote:
          Hey David!

          Welcome to the roots radical world! I usually lurk and lust (after the Big Dummy, and, yes, that's a bike) but will become more vocal soon. I'm up river in Baton Rouge, 54 years old, and having the time of my life.

          We certainly know the 'summer is hell' feeling; nothing like an afternoon rain storm when it's already 95 degrees. The air along the River is so saturated with moisture before it rains that after it rains water doesn't so much evaporate as hover in an almost-fog from the ground to about 10 feet up. As long as one is moving it's not so bad but as soon as one stops, get out the towels.

          As I was born and raised in Florida I'd rather be hot than cold; I was 19 before I saw ice outside of a glass. I am amazed to read about how y'all ride in winter weather.

          Peace,

          Mark M








          Make every e-mail and IM count. Join the i’m Initiative from Microsoft.
        • kwikfile08
          In the OC - Animalheim - By Disney Land ... Arrowhead for ... reading ... pretty funny. ... and the ... first ... special ... a few ... city at the ... them up
          Message 4 of 21 , Jun 2 2:45 PM
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            In the OC - Animalheim - By Disney Land

            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, D.D.Jackson <ddjackso@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks for the welcome, Carl.
            >
            > What part of Cali you in? I lived in Manhattan Beach and Lake
            Arrowhead for
            > a few years.
            >
            > David
            >
            > On Mon, Jun 2, 2008 at 8:23 AM, kwikfile08 <kwikfile08@...> wrote:
            >
            > > I like you already! You will like it here for sure. Old farts are cool
            > > people, hell everyone is
            > > cool people. In this blog is a wealth of knowledge and fun. Keep
            reading
            > > and posting. I
            > > enjoy the way you write. The part about getting ticketed was
            pretty funny.
            > >
            > > The beer and soft drinks are in the fridge, the ball game is on
            and the
            > > BBQ is almost
            > > ready. So relax and chill with the Roots!
            > >
            > > Peace,
            > >
            > > Carl from California
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, D.D.Jackson <ddjackso@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hey, Everyone.
            > > >
            > > > About 45 years ago, a friend of mine and I bought (arguably) the
            first
            > > > Schwin 10-speeds sold in the New Orleans area. They had to be
            special
            > > > ordered. The owner of the lawn mower shop --- that also carried
            a few
            > > bikes
            > > > as a sideline (The larger of the two sources of bikes in the
            city at the
            > > > time) --- had no idea what we were asking for and had to look
            them up in
            > > the
            > > > Schwin catalog. Change happens.
            > > >
            > > > Our first 'real' ride was 90 miles south to the end of the road
            at the
            > > Gulf
            > > > of Mexico....yeah, tha asphalt just stopped at the edge of the
            marsh. Not
            > > > even a road block of any kind. We started out at 2am, maybe 3.
            Lights?
            > > > Oooops... We did have reflectors in back though.
            > > >
            > > > Got stopped by the police who wanted to know what in the hell we
            were
            > > doing.
            > > > They ticketed us for riding bicycles on the highway and told us
            we had to
            > > > ride the rest of the way on the loose clamshells along the side
            of the
            > > road.
            > > > That lasted for about 10 feet. Never saw the cops again,
            luckily. We made
            > > it
            > > > there and back, the start of a long series of biking adventures.
            > > >
            > > > Now I'm just a fat old fart who wants to be able to ride my two
            dogs to
            > > the
            > > > coffee shop with me. Not all that radical either, but wtf.
            > > >
            > > > Just discovered the Xtracycle this morning and from there found
            other
            > > 'cargo
            > > > biking' resources. Saw some great bikes on flickr too.
            > > >
            > > > Ya'll drop a note.
            > > > David
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > You're getting this message because you signed up to be an
            Xtracycle roots
            > > radical.
            > >
            > > To Post a message, send it to: rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > >
            > > ride to believe.Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Mark Garvey
            ... they were expecting a huge wave to hit the East coast. Roads and highways were jammed with cars and people trying to leave. One of our heroes was
            Message 5 of 21 , Jun 3 4:40 PM
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              On Mon, Jun 2, 2008 at 1:31 PM, M.E. Martin <xibilba931@...> wrote:


              Of course, as soon as they say, "Get the hell out! Hurricane comin'!" there will be all kinds of vehicles up there trying to get out. The good thing is, even a Big Dummy could make it through the jam and get to high ground if need be.

              Mark M


              I don't remember the movie, but it was something about a big disaster where they were expecting a huge wave to hit the East coast.  Roads and  highways were jammed with cars and people trying to leave.  One of "our heroes" was taking his girlfriend out on a small motorcycle and was swiftly negotiating the stalled lines of traffic with no problem.  OK, a movie I know...and a motorcycle, not a bicycle....but the principal is roughly the same.  I don't really take chances like that, but riding a bicycle through stalled traffic is easy, even if it is a bit on the hazardous side.

              mark
            • David Chase
              Back in 1989, when the Loma Prieta quake messed up the SF Bar area, I happened to have ridden to work on my bicycle (along with several colleagues). All the
              Message 6 of 21 , Jun 3 5:30 PM
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                Back in 1989, when the Loma Prieta quake messed up the SF Bar area, I
                happened to have ridden to work on my bicycle (along with several
                colleagues). All the lights were out of commission, traffic went no-
                where, and we flowed through it like water. Hurricanes don't move
                that fast on the Gulf Coast (8-12mph); you could mostly outrun one on
                a bicycle, especially if you were on the bad side of the eye with the
                wind at your back.

                IF you were serious about the possibility of bike-evacuation (in NOLA,
                in particular), I recommend thinking about flotation for the bike --
                how big an inner tube (or two) and where would you locate them on the
                bike? I see no reason not to at least think it through; we had
                earthquake plans ready back then, and they worked (call my aunt in SF
                because my grandmother was visiting and doesn't know the drill, call
                landlord to let him know that there were no gas or water leaks, then
                call out of state to my parents, who call everybody else.)

                David

                On 2008-06-02, at 2:31 PM, M.E. Martin wrote:
                >
                > Of course, as soon as they say, "Get the hell out! Hurricane
                > comin'!" there will be all kinds of vehicles up there trying to get
                > out. The good thing is, even a Big Dummy could make it through the
                > jam and get to high ground if need be.
                >
                ddjackso@... wrote:

                > Good to know there's at least one other person on here living in
                > this natural steam bath. If it gets any hotter, and we both know it
                > will, my enthusiasm for bike riding may taper off a bit till next
                > October. I couldn't evacuate for a hurricane on a Big Dummy
                > anyway....there too many other big dummies on the road then. But I
                > don't evacuate anyway, really.
              • tda0818
                You could always go with the Pugsley and those hella fat tires. They hold enough air just at normal riding pressure to float the bike by themselves. Or so
                Message 7 of 21 , Jun 3 5:57 PM
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                  You could always go with the Pugsley and those hella fat tires. They
                  hold enough air just at normal riding pressure to float the bike by
                  themselves. Or so I'm told.

                  -- urbino

                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > IF you were serious about the possibility of bike-evacuation (in NOLA,
                  > in particular), I recommend thinking about flotation for the bike --
                  > how big an inner tube (or two) and where would you locate them on the
                  > bike? I see no reason not to at least think it through; we had
                  > earthquake plans ready back then, and they worked (call my aunt in SF
                  > because my grandmother was visiting and doesn't know the drill, call
                  > landlord to let him know that there were no gas or water leaks, then
                  > call out of state to my parents, who call everybody else.)
                  >
                  > David
                  >
                • Mark Garvey
                  ... Tres COOL! But I tink I would toss a couple of small truck tubes into the bags. If thigs began to get hairy, you could pop out your tire pump (you DO
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jun 3 6:46 PM
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                    On Tue, Jun 3, 2008 at 7:57 PM, tda0818 <tda0818@...> wrote:
                    You could always go with the Pugsley and those hella fat tires.  They
                    hold enough air just at normal riding pressure to float the bike by
                    themselves.  Or so I'm told.

                    -- urbino

                    Tres COOL!  But I tink I would toss a couple of small truck tubes into the bags.  If thigs began to get hairy, you could pop out your tire pump (you DO carry one???) and inflate one or more and make a makeshift raft.    Keep a sharp stick handy for the 'gators though!

                    mark (who went through Hurricane Elouise and know what you arre talking about!!!  that sucked!)

                    by the way, we had a really terrible tornado up in Parkersburg last week.  Bikes are...or were...the on'y way to get through a lot of places  100 year old trees were laying across the road in places.

                    mark
                  • tda0818
                    I don t know nuffin about hurricanes, but soupy heat and tornadoes, them s another matter. I m pretty sure there isn t a bike suitable for riding away from a
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jun 3 8:23 PM
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                      I don't know nuffin' about hurricanes, but soupy heat and tornadoes,
                      them's another matter. I'm pretty sure there isn't a bike suitable
                      for riding away from a tornado. OTOH, the humidity just might be high
                      enough here in the summertime to float a bike.

                      I heard about the Parkersburg tornado from a guy at the office who's
                      from Cedar Rapids. Those things are no. fun. I've seen (too often)
                      the kind of destruction you're talking about, and been to the funerals.

                      Sending good vibes toward Parkersburg...

                      -- urbino

                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Garvey" <lazybee45@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Tres COOL! But I tink I would toss a couple of small truck tubes
                      into the
                      > bags. If thigs began to get hairy, you could pop out your tire pump
                      (you DO
                      > carry one???) and inflate one or more and make a makeshift raft.
                      Keep a
                      > sharp stick handy for the 'gators though!
                      >
                      > mark (who went through Hurricane Elouise and know what you arre talking
                      > about!!! that sucked!)
                      >
                      > by the way, we had a really terrible tornado up in Parkersburg last
                      week.
                      > Bikes are...or were...the on'y way to get through a lot of places
                      100 year
                      > old trees were laying across the road in places.
                      >
                      > mark
                      >
                    • Mark Garvey
                      ... Do you want to know the REAL good thing about the Parkersburg tornado? the BIGGEST problem that the rescue people have right now is how to coordinate ALL
                      Message 10 of 21 , Jun 3 8:35 PM
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                        On Tue, Jun 3, 2008 at 10:23 PM, tda0818 <tda0818@...> wrote:


                        Sending good vibes toward Parkersburg...

                        -- urbino

                        Do you want to know the REAL "good" thing about the Parkersburg tornado?  the BIGGEST problem that the rescue people have right now is how to coordinate ALL THE VOLUNTEERS WHO SHOW UP TO HELP!  The town is only about 1800 people and the Volunteers have outnumbered the residents by a significant number so far!  ISN'T THAT COOL????

                        Believe it or not, Parkersburg Iowa has the HIGHEST number of former residents who now play for the NFL.  (4 NFL players are from the Aplington/Parkersburg Schools)  and THEY have shown up to help! 

                        The really strange thing was the other day when they were interviewing people in town who were NOT hit!  One woman showed that the house next to her, was damaged, but not badly, HER house was not hurt at all.  but the house beyond the damaged one was GONE, as was everything for a half mile south!

                        I have delivered to the lumber company there.  the Lumberyard is no longer recognizable.  it is a series fo concrete slabs.  the truck stop is gone, so are about half the houses  and most of the businesses in town!  It looks like pictures I have seen of No Mans Land in Europe in War 1.  Piles of rubble and debris with a few bare tree trunks sticking up here and there!

                        tornadoes are frightening.   Malicious, and nasty!  this one had winds of nearly 200 mph.  A Mobile home was picked up and dumped a half mile from where it started.  A semi was picked up and tossed into a field like a toy.  An RV dealer in Waterloo looked like my grand daughters toy box!

                        Freaky stuff weather!

                        mark
                      • tda0818
                        ... next to ... Yeah, that s how they do. The destruction is absolute and completely random. Several years ago, one ripped through a small town just north of
                        Message 11 of 21 , Jun 3 8:59 PM
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                          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Garvey" <lazybee45@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > The really strange thing was the other day when they were interviewing
                          > people in town who were NOT hit! One woman showed that the house
                          next to
                          > her, was damaged, but not badly, HER house was not hurt at all. but the
                          > house beyond the damaged one was GONE, as was everything for a half mile
                          > south!
                          >

                          Yeah, that's how they do. The destruction is absolute and completely
                          random. Several years ago, one ripped through a small town just north
                          of where I lived at the time. You could stand at one end of its path
                          and look straight through to the other end of town, as if it were a
                          power line right-of-way. The houses at the edges of the path were
                          damaged by the debris and downed trees, but the ones beyond those were
                          perfectly normal.

                          > tornadoes are frightening. Malicious, and nasty! this one had
                          winds of
                          > nearly 200 mph. A Mobile home was picked up and dumped a half mile from
                          > where it started. A semi was picked up and tossed into a field like
                          a toy.
                          > An RV dealer in Waterloo looked like my grand daughters toy box!

                          I saw some video the other day of one going through a parking lot.
                          There were 6 cars parked together in 2 rows of 3. It went by the one
                          in the lower right corner like it wasn't there, picked up the 2 next
                          to it and the 2 across from them -- about 10 feet in the air -- and
                          scattered them end-over-end like dry leaves.

                          Bad juju, tornadoes.

                          -- urbino
                        • Cara Lin Bridgman
                          In the movie, Independence Day, the hero rides his bike through the grid-locked traffic of NYC to reach safety. CL
                          Message 12 of 21 , Jun 4 5:56 AM
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                            In the movie, Independence Day, the hero rides his bike through the
                            grid-locked traffic of NYC to reach safety.

                            CL

                            Mark Garvey wrote:
                            > I don't remember the movie, but it was something about a big disaster
                            > where they were expecting a huge wave to hit the East coast. Roads and
                            > highways were jammed with cars and people trying to leave. One of "our
                            > heroes" was taking his girlfriend out on a small motorcycle and was
                            > swiftly negotiating the stalled lines of traffic with no problem. OK, a
                            > movie I know...and a motorcycle, not a bicycle....but the principal is
                            > roughly the same. I don't really take chances like that, but riding a
                            > bicycle through stalled traffic is easy, even if it is a bit on the
                            > hazardous side.
                          • Tone@moon-shine.net
                            I think that movie you are talking about was the one where a meteor was going to crash into earth. There were two movies in recent years, which came out with
                            Message 13 of 21 , Jun 4 6:30 AM
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                              I think that movie you are talking about was the one where a meteor
                              was going to crash into earth. There were two movies in recent years,
                              which came out with that premise. I think the one you are talking
                              about had Morgan Freeman as the president or something and the kid on
                              the motorcycle was an astronomy enthusiast, who was the first to
                              discover the meteor. The meteor was destroyed, but pieces of it fell
                              into the ocean and a tidal wave resulted. The kid was motorcycling his
                              butt and his new wife along with the wife's baby sibling.

                              I know when I saw that I was thinking someone with an Xtracycle would
                              be able to bypass traffic jams and carry a good deal of their
                              possessions along with a loved one or two. :)
                              I also cheered for what looked liked a bike messenger easily scooting
                              through bumper-to-bumper stalled traffic on the streets in New York
                              City in the movie Independence Day... right before the Aliens shot
                              their beam down through the empire state building or whatever.
                              Let us not forget that recent movie about global warming and climate
                              change, "The Day After Tomorrow". When New York City was being hit by
                              torrential rain flooding the streets I believe there was a cyclist
                              (maybe messenger) riding in between the water-logged cars in the
                              streets.

                              I always get a kick seeing cyclists bypassing auto traffic in movies.
                              I just wished they depicted cycling more often in a positive light.
                              _TONE_
                            • Mighk Wilson
                              ... principal is roughly the same. I don t really take chances like that, but riding a bicycle through stalled traffic is easy, even if it is a bit on the
                              Message 14 of 21 , Jun 4 6:51 AM
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                                >> OK, a movie I know...and a motorcycle, not a bicycle....but the principal is roughly the same.  I don't really take chances like that, but riding a bicycle through stalled traffic is easy, even if it is a bit on the hazardous side.<<

                                 

                                Shouldn’t bee too hazardous unless traffic is still moving; that’s when people will see gaps and change lanes to get into them.  It also depends on whether the street is curbed or not.  I routinely pass stopped traffic on the right on my way to work, BUT, I hang back in any situation in which a motorist COULD turn right across my path.  On a road with no curbs however you could get people suddenly veering out onto the shoulder.

                                 

                                I recall hearing about someone who actually did evacuate from NOLA by bike prior to Katrina; rode to Baton Rouge .

                                 

                                Mighk


                              • D.D.Jackson
                                I stayed in New Orleans for Katrina. ...Finally left the Thursday following the levee breech on Tuesday at the advice of local police. I cleaned up the front
                                Message 15 of 21 , Jun 4 7:34 AM
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                                  I stayed in New Orleans for Katrina.

                                  ...Finally left the Thursday following the levee breech on Tuesday at the advice of local police. I cleaned up the front yard with a loaded shotgun and my German Shepherd nearby. You could hear gunshots and burglar alarms going off all day. People were driving up and down the streets armed with guns. I was the only person on my block and eventually took my car to each end of the street and drug downed trees across the road to stop strangers from cruising up the street.

                                  But come to think of it, when we did leave, first driving west to Baton Rouge, we didn't see anyone on a bike.

                                  There were people walking, hitching, pushing wheelchairs, but no bikes. The most desperate folks we saw on the highway, or craziest idk,  was a subcompact with four people inside the car and two more laying on the outside rear of the car: A man and a woman each holding on with one hand inside an opened sun roof, a suitcase in the other hand, their feet dangling down to the rear bumper.

                                  We passed them going 70 mph, but just barely. If their grip slipped, they were dead.



                                  On Wed, Jun 4, 2008 at 8:51 AM, Mighk Wilson <mwilson@...> wrote:

                                  I recall hearing about someone who actually did evacuate from NOLA by bike prior to Katrina; rode to Baton Rouge.

                                  Mighk



                                • Spidra Webster
                                  ... I wondered every time I saw gridlocked traffic during Katrina why some folks didn t just put the essentials in a backpack and start bicycling. It really
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Jun 4 11:09 AM
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                                    I wondered every time I saw gridlocked traffic during Katrina why some folks didn't just put the essentials in a backpack and start bicycling.  It really nagged at me. I wondered how many more people could have survived...

                                    Megan Lynch


                                    Berkeley, CA


                                    CRFG, NAFEX: I'm in USDA Zone 9b


                                    Garden with me on Folia: http://myfolia.com/gardener/spidra/invite

                                    Golden Gate Chapter Blog: http://crfggoldengate.blogspot.com/


                                    Chapter Events on Upcoming.org:  http://upcoming.yahoo.com/group/3429/

                                  • Cara Lin Bridgman
                                    Hi Megan, There is such a thing as learned helplessness. In a society where the options seem to be limited to car make and model, you re not likely to think
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Jun 4 8:31 PM
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                                      Hi Megan,

                                      There is such a thing as learned helplessness. In a society where the
                                      options seem to be limited to car make and model, you're not likely to
                                      think of walking or biking out of a danger zone when you're in a panic
                                      to escape. If you worked out an escape plan or if you were hiking or
                                      biking regularly, taking the bike would almost be a no-brainer.

                                      Also, what are the essentials? Passport, birth certificate, bank book
                                      or sleeping bag, plastic sheeting, and fire starter. It would be really
                                      interesting to study the things people took when they evacuated. Books
                                      describing evacuations in WWII in China showed people carrying their
                                      gold and their children. Amy Tan talks about her mother or her
                                      grandmother trying to carry out a mahjong set--they ain't light!

                                      CL

                                      Spidra Webster wrote:
                                      > I wondered every time I saw gridlocked traffic during Katrina why some
                                      > folks didn't just put the essentials in a backpack and start bicycling.
                                      > It really nagged at me. I wondered how many more people could have
                                      > survived...
                                      >
                                      > Megan Lynch
                                    • Mighk Wilson
                                      ... options seem to be limited to car make and model, you re not likely to think of walking or biking out of a danger zone when you re in a panic to escape.
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Jun 5 10:58 AM
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                                        Cara wrote:

                                        >>There is such a thing as learned helplessness. In a society where the
                                        options seem to be limited to car make and model, you're not likely to
                                        think of walking or biking out of a danger zone when you're in a panic
                                        to escape.<<

                                        It can also be a function of not having a bicycle that's practical for
                                        carrying stuff, or that's even rideable for distances more than a couple
                                        miles. If someone rides a couple miles on a big-box junk bike with the
                                        seat two inches too low and 15 lbs of air in the tires and (predictably)
                                        feels whipped afterward, no way they're going to think of bicycling as a
                                        practical solution.

                                        I routinely hear from people wondering "how to carry stuff," as if they
                                        have never seen anyone carrying stuff by bike.

                                        But I suppose all of that could also be classified under "learned
                                        helplessness."

                                        Mighk
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