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Re: [rootsradicals] selecting a bike

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  • Bill
    I have a problem with the push forward configuration... I can t stand up and use both upper and lower body to push and pull if I need to. I have a Townie and
    Message 1 of 14 , May 6, 2008
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      I have a problem with the push forward configuration...  I can't stand up and use both upper and lower body to push and pull if I need to. I have a Townie and really enjoy riding it in the city...   Boerne, Tx ... but put the X on my older Specialized Hardrock with a shock absorbing seat post from Nashbar - $19. - and a Girvin flex stem.... Power Grips on the pedals,  flashing bell, christmas silver garland interwoven through the front spokes and a pinwheel.

      The Townie is also decked out with a white sidewall fat tire in the back and narrow tire in the front and cold cathode lights from "vibe lights" for that lowrider look. It' s for parades.

      On Tue, May 6, 2008 at 10:20 PM, Cathode Ray <ray@...> wrote:

      Go for the Townie, women's frame.

      I initially fitted the X to a 700C hybrid. Then I put it on my wife's
      Townie. It is great!

      I have carried people in excess of 80 Kg, plus luggage. No problem at
      all. If it feels a bit wobbly, just ask the passenger to move forward
      a bit.

      Another advantage of the Townie is the forward pedalling position. On
      a standard frame, my heels would sometimes interfere with the toes of
      my passenger. The Townie geometry completely overcomes this problem.

      The Townie frame is pretty strong, has an extra gussett welding where
      the the seat tube meets the top tube. Certainly much stronger then a
      standard women's frame.

      I actually don't like the terminology. I am man enough to ride a
      women's bike! The women's frame has no crunchy nut-bar, so avoids the
      chance of painful gonad crushing when mounting.

      ray


    • jseidenstein
      Do you find the crank forward configuration to be a major issue? I liked the idea of being able to touch the ground from the saddle, and I read this article
      Message 2 of 14 , May 7, 2008
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        Do you find the crank forward configuration to be a major issue? I
        liked the idea of being able to touch the ground from the saddle, and
        I read this article wherein Sheldon basically argues that you
        shouldn't stand up to pedal:

        http://sheldonbrown.com/standing.html

        I have no particular desire to stand to pedal if it's not necessary
        for some reason. To Cathode Ray, my only objection to the "womens'"
        frame was the warning on the xtracycle page. I was able to mount the
        diamond frame version, but I remember thinking it was a serious
        stretch to do so. When the bike was adjusted for me the seat was
        about 1.5 inches above its minimum height, so the lowest point was the
        seat, so I was lifting my foot up to the height of my waist to get it
        over. My wife managed to get onto it somehow, but I didn't watch her.

        What is the Mundo's stand over height? (I'd touch the bar at 29".)


        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Bill <coteau@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have a problem with the push forward configuration... I can't
        stand up
        > and use both upper and lower body to push and pull if I need to. I
        have a
        > Townie and really enjoy riding it in the city... Boerne, Tx ...
        but put
        > the X on my older Specialized Hardrock with a shock absorbing seat
        post from
        > Nashbar - $19. - and a Girvin flex stem.... Power Grips on the pedals,
        > flashing bell, christmas silver garland interwoven through the front
        spokes
        > and a pinwheel.
        >
        > The Townie is also decked out with a white sidewall fat tire in the
        back and
        > narrow tire in the front and cold cathode lights from "vibe lights"
        for that
        > lowrider look. It' s for parades.
        >
        > On Tue, May 6, 2008 at 10:20 PM, Cathode Ray <ray@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Go for the Townie, women's frame.
        > >
        > > I initially fitted the X to a 700C hybrid. Then I put it on my wife's
        > > Townie. It is great!
        > >
        > > I have carried people in excess of 80 Kg, plus luggage. No problem at
        > > all. If it feels a bit wobbly, just ask the passenger to move forward
        > > a bit.
        > >
        > > Another advantage of the Townie is the forward pedalling position. On
        > > a standard frame, my heels would sometimes interfere with the toes of
        > > my passenger. The Townie geometry completely overcomes this problem.
        > >
        > > The Townie frame is pretty strong, has an extra gussett welding where
        > > the the seat tube meets the top tube. Certainly much stronger then a
        > > standard women's frame.
        > >
        > > I actually don't like the terminology. I am man enough to ride a
        > > women's bike! The women's frame has no crunchy nut-bar, so avoids the
        > > chance of painful gonad crushing when mounting.
        > >
        > > ray
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Cara Lin Bridgman
        Get the Yuba, but order free-loaders from Xtracycle. You ll need to make some small adjustments, but they should be easy to tie, strap, and velco to any bike
        Message 3 of 14 , May 7, 2008
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          Get the Yuba, but order free-loaders from Xtracycle. You'll need to
          make some small adjustments, but they should be easy to tie, strap, and
          velco to any bike with frames like the Yuba has.

          CL

          jseidenstein wrote:
          > The trouble with the
          > integrated bikes is the lack of decent cargo carrying options. The
          > Yuba comes with nothing, and the Kona comes with some bags that I'm
          > not so sure about. (They are apparently the size of a grocery bag but
          > it appears there is no way to tighten them for small loads.)
        • Bill
          I get a much more balanced use of my body with a regular , not just the tops of my legs... also why I switch off between recumbent and road bike... and even
          Message 4 of 14 , May 7, 2008
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            I get a much more balanced use of my body with a regular , not just the tops of my legs...  also why I switch off between recumbent and road bike...  and even in low gear with a load I may need to accelerate / lug up part of a hill.  It's also a change of position. I certainly don't do it "more often than I should" but can't do it ever on the Townie.


            per SB - 
            It is my belief that a great many cyclists stand up to pedal much more often than they should. I've often said:

            "If you find yourself standing to accelerate, on level ground, it is a sign that your gear is too high or that your saddle is too low."

            Standing pedaling allows you to apply more force to the pedals than is possible seated, because you can rest your entire weight on the driven pedal, and, even more, by pulling up on the handlebar, you can push the pedal with more than your actual weight...but is this a good thing?

            On Wed, May 7, 2008 at 6:06 AM, jseidenstein <hummingjoni@...> wrote:

            Do you find the crank forward configuration to be a major issue

            liked the idea of being able to touch the ground from the saddle, and
            I read this article wherein Sheldon basically argues that you
            shouldn't stand up to pedal:

            http://sheldonbrown.com/standing.html


          • tda0818
            I ve been riding a Townie X for 7 months, now, and I think it would work perfectly for what you describe. It will handle the loads you ll be carrying, and
            Message 5 of 14 , May 8, 2008
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              I've been riding a Townie X for 7 months, now, and I think it would
              work perfectly for what you describe. It will handle the loads you'll
              be carrying, and it'll be a comfortable ride.

              No further than you'll be riding, and with only one moderate (and
              unloaded) hill, I'd get the 3- or maybe 7-speed internally geared
              version. You won't need more than that, and with the internal gearing
              your bike will be an all but bulletproof, low maintenance, weather
              ignoring, grocery hauling MACHINE.

              As for the step-over height, my guess is the Townie, even though a bit
              problematic, will be easier than men's version of the other 2. The
              Townie's curved top tube makes it a bit lower than normal for its
              frame size.

              Whatever you get, enjoy! That's the main thing.

              -- urbino

              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "jseidenstein" <hummingjoni@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I'm looking for a bike to use for trips to the farmers market which is
              > about a mile away, and fairly flat. (There is one modest hill which
              > would be downhill when loaded.) I made a list of the maximum load I
              > thought I'd want to transport and came up with about 125 lbs,
              > including a couple half-bushel boxes of fruit. I guesstimated that my
              > typical load would be more like 60 lbs.
              >
              > I don't have any bikes right now. I'm trying to figure out whether to
              > get one of the new integrated bikes (Yuba Mundo, Kona Ute), or an
              > Xtracycle. (The Big Dummy is too expensive.) The trouble with the
              > integrated bikes is the lack of decent cargo carrying options. The
              > Yuba comes with nothing, and the Kona comes with some bags that I'm
              > not so sure about. (They are apparently the size of a grocery bag but
              > it appears there is no way to tighten them for small loads.) The Kona
              > seems to have a rack design where it would be hard to extend it or
              > modify it to carry stuff. The Yuba, at least has what looks like a
              > nicely designed rack.
              >
              > But the lack of carrying options bugs me. (I'm also nervous about the
              > lack of low gears on the Mundo, but frankly I really have no clue how
              > low I need.) So I'm presently leaning towards the Xtracycle. Now
              > given that I haven't been on a bike in 20 years (with the exception of
              > a few test rides), I don't have any particular ideas about what sort
              > of bike I want. It would be ideal if both me (5'4" tall) and my wife
              > (5' tall) could ride the same bike.
              >
              > I looked at xtracycle.com and they recommend 3 bikes, the Sun retro,
              > the Townie, and the Marin Novato. (Those are the ones they sell in
              > kits.) The Townie, being a "one size fits most" bike offers the
              > possibility that me and my wife could both ride it.
              >
              > I test rode the Townie and it seemed fine (though I found it hard to
              > get my leg over the bar). Is there any reason not to use a townie
              > xtracycle for my farmer's market trips?
              >
            • tda0818
              A thought on the standover height issue: I don t own the Footsies or WideLoaders, so maybe someone who does can chime in, but if you get them, you might be
              Message 6 of 14 , May 8, 2008
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                A thought on the standover height issue:

                I don't own the Footsies or WideLoaders, so maybe someone who does can
                chime in, but if you get them, you might be able to use the
                kickstand-side one to get, as it were, a "leg up" on mounting.

                -- urbino

                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "jseidenstein" <hummingjoni@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Do you find the crank forward configuration to be a major issue? I
                > liked the idea of being able to touch the ground from the saddle, and
                > I read this article wherein Sheldon basically argues that you
                > shouldn't stand up to pedal:
                >
                > http://sheldonbrown.com/standing.html
                >
                > I have no particular desire to stand to pedal if it's not necessary
                > for some reason. To Cathode Ray, my only objection to the "womens'"
                > frame was the warning on the xtracycle page. I was able to mount the
                > diamond frame version, but I remember thinking it was a serious
                > stretch to do so. When the bike was adjusted for me the seat was
                > about 1.5 inches above its minimum height, so the lowest point was the
                > seat, so I was lifting my foot up to the height of my waist to get it
                > over. My wife managed to get onto it somehow, but I didn't watch her.
                >
                > What is the Mundo's stand over height? (I'd touch the bar at 29".)
                >
                >
              • Antonio
                Urbino, I strongly recommend NOT using the footsies or the wide-loaders as a stepping point to help in mounting the Xtracycle... unless a person has some kind
                Message 7 of 14 , May 9, 2008
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                  Urbino,
                  I strongly recommend NOT using the footsies or the wide-loaders as a
                  stepping point to help in mounting the Xtracycle... unless a person
                  has some kind of reinforced kickstand or center stand.
                  The standard issue kickstands, which come with the Xtracycle, are not
                  meant to take that much strain on them. I believe it even says
                  somewhere not to sit on the Xtracycle like a bench when the bike is
                  being held up by the kickstand.
                  When I was a messenger I sometimes had a few minutes of down-time here
                  and there, so I occasionally would lightly sit/lean on the snap-deck
                  like it was a bench. I went through about three kickstands that way!
                  I would imagine actually using any part of the Xtracycle when it is
                  parked with the kickstand down in a jarring step motion probably puts
                  a lot more strain on a kickstand than just gently leaning back on the
                  snap-deck.
                  _TONE_
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