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Re: more experience with Yuba Mundo

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  • kwikfile08
    Morgan, I would like to hear more about your experience with the Yuba, I am mixed about my next rig. I was err am Jonsing real hard for a Big Dummy. But the
    Message 1 of 13 , May 5, 2008
      Morgan,

      I would like to hear more about your experience with the Yuba, I am mixed about my next
      rig. I was err am Jonsing real hard for a Big Dummy. But the data on the Yuba is quite
      interesting. My commute is 28 miles each way (Big down hill starting out in the morning
      500 + drop in 1.5 miles. But the opposite is a climb at mile 56 at the very end.) My bike is
      at around 40-60 lbs on a typical commute. It strengthens me each day I ride and I like it.

      A Yuba with electric motor sounds very cool - keep us posted for sure.

      Namaste'

      Carl


      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Morgan <mcgurme@...> wrote:
      >
      > Yesterday I made my weekly run to the local grocery co-op on the Yuba
      > Mundo. It is a 7 mile ride each way, with some moderate hills, and a
      > few short steep ones. I strapped a big rubbermaid bucket on one side
      > as a carrier, and on the other side, I just used a caribiner to attach
      > a large Costco grocery sack. I loaded the bike up with about 60
      > pounds of groceries (to feed a family of 5).
      >
      > The first thing I noticed is that this bike swallows that weight with
      > little discernible change in handling. On my Xtracycle, when I load
      > over 40 lbs, I notice it affecting the handling, with a bit more of a
      > "noodle" or "whippy" feel. With the Yuba, I couldn't tell it was
      > loaded until I hit the hills. For moderate hills it was fine. For
      > the few steep ones, the lowest gear could be a bit easier, I had to
      > stand a bit to mash up the hill. Here's where an electric assist and/
      > or installing some easier gears would help.
      >
      > The bike is well balanced. I rediscovered the joy of being able to
      > ride hands free! It feels really stable and solid.
      >
      > The lack of an integrated pannier like the Xtracycle is a bit of a
      > bummer. But the rubbermaid tub worked out pretty well for me. I hope
      > that whatever pannier Ortlieb comes up with is versatile like the
      > Freeloaders.
      >
      > One note to anyone else who gets one, the included tires specify a max
      > PSI of 40. I ignored that and put mine up to 60 psi, and it rolls
      > much better. Even at that pressure, the bike handles really smoothly
      > both on and off road.
      >
      > Also, the bike doesn't do as well for loading up with the side
      > kickstand. It seems to want to flop over more than my Xtracycle does,
      > perhaps because the kickstand is positioned a bit more forward. For
      > loading it, the "bipod" kickstand or similar will be the way to go (we
      > have one on the way, but its not here yet).
      >
      > This bike reminds me of the Land Cruiser I used to own. Solid,
      > utilitarian, built to last virtually forever, but without extra fluff
      > (giving lots of opportunity for tinkering and upgrades, for those so
      > inclined!).
      >
      > I'll definitely keep using my X for a lot of rides, especially with
      > light loads. But for heavy loads, I think the Yuba will be the way to
      > go. Next, I'm going to put a hub motor on it, I'll report back about
      > that if anyone cares to hear about it.
      >
      > Morgan
      >
    • Bill
      just a thought... the Extracycle is a way to take all those bikes out there and make them more usable. The Yuba is a major investment in another bike with all
      Message 2 of 13 , May 5, 2008
        just a thought...  the Extracycle is a way to take all those bikes out there and make them more usable. The Yuba is a major investment in another bike with all the same [but not in the same magnitude] of expending more energy in steel, investment, etc.   ...may be more applicable in the third world but so is all the last 2% upgrade.

        On Mon, May 5, 2008 at 8:33 PM, kwikfile08 <kwikfile08@...> wrote:


        Morgan,

        I would like to hear more about your experience with the Yuba, I am mixed about my next
        rig. I was err am Jonsing real hard for a Big Dummy. But the data on the Yuba is quite le
        interesting. My commute is 28 miles each way (Big down hill starting out in the morning
        500 + drop in 1.5 miles. But the opposite is a climb at mile 56 at the very end.) My bike is
        at around 40-60 lbs on a typical commute. It strengthens me each day I ride and I like it.

        A Yuba with electric motor sounds very cool - keep us posted for sure.

        Namaste'

        Carl



        --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Morgan <mcgurme@...> wrote:
        >
        > Yesterday I made my weekly run to the local grocery co-op on the Yuba
        > Mundo. It is a 7 mile ride each way, with some moderate hills, and a
        > few short steep ones. I strapped a big rubbermaid bucket on one side
        > as a carrier, and on the other side, I just used a caribiner to attach
        > a large Costco grocery sack. I loaded the bike up with about 60
        > pounds of groceries (to feed a family of 5).
        >
        > The first thing I noticed is that this bike swallows that weight with
        > little discernible change in handling. On my Xtracycle, when I load
        > over 40 lbs, I notice it affecting the handling, with a bit more of a
        > "noodle" or "whippy" feel. With the Yuba, I couldn't tell it was
        > loaded until I hit the hills. For moderate hills it was fine. For
        > the few steep ones, the lowest gear could be a bit easier, I had to
        > stand a bit to mash up the hill. Here's where an electric assist and/
        > or installing some easier gears would help.
        >
        > The bike is well balanced. I rediscovered the joy of being able to
        > ride hands free! It feels really stable and solid.
        >
        > The lack of an integrated pannier like the Xtracycle is a bit of a
        > bummer. But the rubbermaid tub worked out pretty well for me. I hope
        > that whatever pannier Ortlieb comes up with is versatile like the
        > Freeloaders.
        >
        > One note to anyone else who gets one, the included tires specify a max
        > PSI of 40. I ignored that and put mine up to 60 psi, and it rolls
        > much better. Even at that pressure, the bike handles really smoothly
        > both on and off road.
        >
        > Also, the bike doesn't do as well for loading up with the side
        > kickstand. It seems to want to flop over more than my Xtracycle does,
        > perhaps because the kickstand is positioned a bit more forward. For
        > loading it, the "bipod" kickstand or similar will be the way to go (we
        > have one on the way, but its not here yet).
        >
        > This bike reminds me of the Land Cruiser I used to own. Solid,
        > utilitarian, built to last virtually forever, but without extra fluff
        > (giving lots of opportunity for tinkering and upgrades, for those so
        > inclined!).
        >
        > I'll definitely keep using my X for a lot of rides, especially with
        > light loads. But for heavy loads, I think the Yuba will be the way to
        > go. Next, I'm going to put a hub motor on it, I'll report back about
        > that if anyone cares to hear about it.
        >
        > Morgan
        >


      • Spamus
        ... This really isn t an apt comparison. Should be given that a Yuba is much more stiffer than an X. A better comparison would be with the Big Dummy. ... I
        Message 3 of 13 , May 6, 2008
          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Morgan <mcgurme@...> wrote:

          > On my Xtracycle, when I load over 40 lbs, I notice it affecting the
          > handling, with a bit more of a "noodle" or "whippy" feel. With the
          > Yuba, I couldn't tell it was loaded until I hit the hills.

          This really isn't an apt comparison. Should be given that a Yuba is
          much more stiffer than an X. A better comparison would be with the Big
          Dummy.




          > Also, the bike doesn't do as well for loading up with the side
          > kickstand. It seems to want to flop over more than my Xtracycle
          > does,perhaps because the kickstand is positioned a bit more forward.
          > For loading it, the "bipod" kickstand or similar will be the way to
          > go...

          I doubt a Bipod would be an improvement. I have Hebie's version and
          it, like others, suffers from not being wide enough to stabilize an
          imbalanced load.


          However, I also like the concept of the Yuba, especially its
          unpretentiousness. Some of those Big Dummy builds, especially those
          with all the bling, make me gag. They remind me of SUV owners who
          never take their SUV's off-road.
        • Vik
          Living in a car-centric culture I am constantly amazed at cyclists that choose to divide up and classify other cyclists as not worthy of belonging to their
          Message 4 of 13 , May 6, 2008
            Living in a car-centric culture I am constantly amazed at cyclists that choose to divide up and classify other cyclists as not worthy of belonging to their pedal powered posse based on the type of bike they are riding, the parts they hang off a frame or the clothes they wear.

            I'm pretty sure my Big Dummy was one of the ones making you gag.  I also ride a recumbent, a folding bike, an old mountain bike and a touring bike. Given my odd collection of bikes I am often faced with other rider's negative perceptions of the machine I have chosen and every time it is equally disappointing.

            In this instance it comes down to the which parts I put on a frame - one set of parts choices would make me cool and the other makes you gag???....frankly that's sad. 

            Everyone that gets around on something requiring pedal power shares a whole lot more than the minor differences that can be used to divide us up.

            safe riding,

            Vik
            www.vikram-banerjee.com
            www.thelazyrando.com
            www.viks-tikit.com
            www.viks-bigdummy.com




            On 6-May-08, at 9:35 AM, Spamus wrote:

            --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, Morgan <mcgurme@... > wrote:



            However, I also like the concept of the Yuba, especially its
            unpretentiousness. Some of those Big Dummy builds, especially those
            with all the bling, make me gag. They remind me of SUV owners who
            never take their SUV's off-road.


          • murray
            ... I think it is quite an apt comparison since both bikes are esentailly designed for the same purpose. Other readers of this list who might be considering
            Message 5 of 13 , May 6, 2008
              >> On my Xtracycle, when I load over 40 lbs, I notice it affecting the
              >> handling, with a bit more of a "noodle" or "whippy" feel. With the
              >> Yuba, I couldn't tell it was loaded until I hit the hills.
              >
              >This really isn't an apt comparison. Should be given that a Yuba is
              >much more stiffer than an X. A better comparison would be with the Big
              >Dummy.

              I think it is quite an apt comparison since both bikes are esentailly
              designed for the same purpose. Other readers of this list who might be
              considering either a Yuba or an X would find this comparison useful,
              and yes, it is as expected, the Yuba is stiffer... but for someone who
              perhaps has only ridden the X (most one this list) that is not
              something I would automatically assume without riding it myself.
            • phaedrus
              ... The same might be said of the Big Dummy. Respectfully, I disagree with your sentiment. Living car free and sometimes carrying BIG loads, the Big Dummy (and
              Message 6 of 13 , May 6, 2008
                > just a thought... the Extracycle is a way to take all those bikes out there
                > and make them more usable. The Yuba is a major investment in another bike
                > with all the same [but not in the same magnitude] of expending more energy
                > in steel, investment, etc. ...may be more applicable in the third world
                > but so is all the last 2% upgrade.

                The same might be said of the Big Dummy.

                Respectfully, I disagree with your sentiment.

                Living car free and sometimes carrying BIG loads, the Big Dummy (and
                most likely the Coffee Bike and the Yuba Mundo) go a step beyond the
                Xtracycle. The greater strength means the frame should last longer
                and the improved stiffness means I can ride with more weight and in
                worse conditions without sacrificing my ability to get around.

                I gave up my car in 2000. In 2006, I got an Xtracycle and it was the
                first time I no longer missed the flexibility the car used to give me.
                In 2008 I got my Big Dummy and its the first time I actually started
                riding my bike longer distances than I absolutely had to and even
                started riding it for fun.

                The Xtracycle is a wonderful thing and a great relatively low
                financial risk to try out a concept that most people haven't had
                experience with but if you're car free and can afford it, a purpose
                built frame should be more pleasurable to use - it certainly was for
                me.

                Again, I've been car free for almost 8 years but only started actually
                really enjoying bicycling this year - which is something to say when
                you consider that it was February in Minnesota when I transitioned
                from "riding because its the right thing to do" to "riding because I
                like to".

                I'm not saying the BD is the perfect frame for everyone. I've seen
                the same transition happen among people who try recumbents for the
                first time - a change from "yeah, I bike" to "I LOVE TO BIKE!". I
                think every person has their own wants and needs and having the right
                bike for them is like realizing you can fly and you're NOT dreaming.

                One of these days I may try putting together a Cruz bike/Xtracycle
                cross. If the bolt on works as well as I think it might, a purpose
                built frame may actually trump my Big Dummy although its hard to
                imagine.

                > However, I also like the concept of the Yuba, especially its
                > unpretentiousness. Some of those Big Dummy builds, especially those
                > with all the bling, make me gag. They remind me of SUV owners who
                > never take their SUV's off-road.

                Have a breath mint.

                If the bling on your bike makes you and/or others smile more when you
                ride, have at it.

                - phaedrus.
              • Phil Good-Elliott
                Someday I may be motivated enough to get a Big Dummy, Yuba Mundo, or something akin to either. Right now, I m working on finding ways of stretching dollars.
                Message 7 of 13 , May 6, 2008
                  Someday I may be motivated enough to get a Big Dummy, Yuba Mundo, or
                  something akin to either. Right now, I'm working on finding ways of
                  stretching dollars. Someday, I'll transform our child trailer into
                  something more capable of carrying large loads as well. Between the X
                  and the trailer, we'll probably be set. Do we NEED to have two utility
                  bikes? No. Do we want two, yes. Can we work around "just" having one?
                  Absolutely. Am I tempted to buy another long-tail, absolutely. Will we
                  ever be car-free? Probably not, given our particular set of life
                  circumstances.

                  I think I'll post this in my blog... Thanks, Vik et al.

                  -Phil
                  http://bikewhenyoucan.blogspot.com/



                  --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Vik <threeohm@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Living in a car-centric culture I am constantly amazed at cyclists
                  > that choose to divide up and classify other cyclists as not worthy of
                  > belonging to their pedal powered posse based on the type of bike they
                  > are riding, the parts they hang off a frame or the clothes they wear.
                  >
                  > I'm pretty sure my Big Dummy was one of the ones making you gag. I
                  > also ride a recumbent, a folding bike, an old mountain bike and a
                  > touring bike. Given my odd collection of bikes I am often faced with
                  > other rider's negative perceptions of the machine I have chosen and
                  > every time it is equally disappointing.
                  >
                  > In this instance it comes down to the which parts I put on a frame -
                  > one set of parts choices would make me cool and the other makes you
                  > gag???....frankly that's sad.
                  >
                  > Everyone that gets around on something requiring pedal power shares a
                  > whole lot more than the minor differences that can be used to divide
                  > us up.
                  >
                  > safe riding,
                  >
                  > Vik
                  > vikbanerjee@...
                  > www.vikram-banerjee.com
                  > www.thelazyrando.com
                  > www.viks-tikit.com
                  > www.viks-bigdummy.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On 6-May-08, at 9:35 AM, Spamus wrote:
                  >
                  > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Morgan <mcgurme@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > However, I also like the concept of the Yuba, especially its
                  > > unpretentiousness. Some of those Big Dummy builds, especially those
                  > > with all the bling, make me gag. They remind me of SUV owners who
                  > > never take their SUV's off-road.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Philip Chase
                  ... Yes, my Big Dummy does fix the whippy problems I had on my X. I had been carrying the kids on the X so much I had gotten used to the tracking issues
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 6, 2008
                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Spamus" <spambait11-bulk@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Morgan <mcgurme@> wrote:
                    >
                    > > On my Xtracycle, when I load over 40 lbs, I notice it affecting the
                    > > handling, with a bit more of a "noodle" or "whippy" feel. With the
                    > > Yuba, I couldn't tell it was loaded until I hit the hills.
                    >
                    > This really isn't an apt comparison. Should be given that a Yuba is
                    > much more stiffer than an X. A better comparison would be with the Big
                    > Dummy.

                    Yes, my Big Dummy does fix the "whippy" problems I had on my X. I had
                    been carrying the kids on the X so much I had gotten used to the
                    tracking issues their weight caused. Between them they weigh 125 lbs.
                    With them and three backpacks we have a lot of weight on the X and
                    the center of gravity is pretty high. So the X and the kids become a
                    heavy inverted pendulum on the back of the bike. This is a recipe for
                    a wiggly ride.

                    The first day I carried them on the Big Dummy I could feel the
                    difference. It was much easier to keep the bike exactly where I
                    wanted it on the pavement. The beam that forms the rear end of the BD
                    has a much deeper section and a lot more bracing then the X. That
                    helps so much.

                    The Yuba Mundo appears to have the same thing going on. Of course it
                    also has a welded upper section--the parts that would be V-rack and
                    snap deck on the X or the BD. That could provide a level of stiffness
                    neither the X nor the BD can achieve. Recall my post recently about
                    the floppiness of the V-racks on the BD and how I fixed it with tape.
                    Much as I like my solution, the YM will never have that problem.

                    Philip
                  • Spamus
                    ... Huh? I need a breath mint to express an opinion? You must live in a really small place... or need to drive more. Obviously all that biking is muddling your
                    Message 9 of 13 , May 6, 2008
                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, phaedrus <rphaedrus@...> wrote:

                      >
                      > Have a breath mint.
                      >
                      > If the bling on your bike makes you and/or others smile more when you
                      > ride, have at it.
                      >
                      > - phaedrus.
                      >

                      Huh? I need a breath mint to express an opinion?

                      You must live in a really small place... or need to drive more.
                      Obviously all that biking is muddling your brain.
                    • phaedrus
                      ... Nope, but if you re gagging, its likely to cause bad breath so you may find a breath mint to be desirable. ... Minneapolis MN does have that small town
                      Message 10 of 13 , May 6, 2008
                        > > > Some of those Big Dummy builds, especially those with all the bling, make me gag.
                        > >
                        > > Have a breath mint.
                        > >
                        > > If the bling on your bike makes you and/or others smile more when you
                        > > ride, have at it.
                        > >
                        > > - phaedrus.
                        > >
                        >
                        > Huh? I need a breath mint to express an opinion?

                        Nope, but if you're gagging, its likely to cause bad breath so you may
                        find a breath mint to be desirable.

                        > You must live in a really small place... or need to drive more.
                        > Obviously all that biking is muddling your brain.

                        Minneapolis MN does have that small town feel most days. Compared to
                        major metro areas like Chicago, NY, and San Fran, it really isn't very
                        big.

                        If using a bike as your primary form of transportation makes one a bit
                        muddled in the brain then my mind is wonderfully mixed up.

                        - phaedrus
                      • Spamus
                        ... Uh, can you please explain it again since I missed it the first time: why does the world revolve around you? From what I ve seen, there are many Big Dummy
                        Message 11 of 13 , May 6, 2008
                          --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Vik <threeohm@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Living in a car-centric culture I am constantly amazed at cyclists
                          > that choose to divide up and classify other cyclists as not worthy of
                          > belonging to their pedal powered posse based on the type of bike they
                          > are riding, the parts they hang off a frame or the clothes they wear.
                          >
                          > I'm pretty sure my Big Dummy was one of the ones making you gag. I
                          > also ride a recumbent, a folding bike, an old mountain bike and a
                          > touring bike. Given my odd collection of bikes I am often faced with
                          > other rider's negative perceptions of the machine I have chosen and
                          > every time it is equally disappointing.
                          >
                          > In this instance it comes down to the which parts I put on a frame -
                          > one set of parts choices would make me cool and the other makes you
                          > gag???....frankly that's sad.
                          >
                          > Everyone that gets around on something requiring pedal power shares a
                          > whole lot more than the minor differences that can be used to divide
                          > us up.
                          >
                          > safe riding,
                          >
                          > Vik


                          Uh, can you please explain it again since I missed it the first time:
                          why does the world revolve around you?

                          From what I've seen, there are many Big Dummy owners out there. And
                          they have blogs and pictures too.

                          But if you're so convinced the shoe fits...
                        • Spamus
                          ... Funny, you seem to know a lot about bad breath and gagging. I don t even want to know why. ... Ah... San Francisco... say it with respect! ... Good for
                          Message 12 of 13 , May 6, 2008
                            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, phaedrus <rphaedrus@...> wrote:

                            > Nope, but if you're gagging, its likely to cause bad breath so you
                            > may find a breath mint to be desirable.

                            Funny, you seem to know a lot about bad breath and gagging. I don't
                            even want to know why.


                            > Minneapolis MN does have that small town feel most days. Compared
                            > to major metro areas like Chicago, NY, and San Fran, it really isn't
                            > very big.

                            Ah... San Francisco... say it with respect!


                            > If using a bike as your primary form of transportation makes one a
                            > bit muddled in the brain then my mind is wonderfully mixed up.

                            Good for you! That's the spirit! (Though it's probably "wonderfully
                            mixed up" for other reasons.)

                            Anyway, back to Xtracycles...
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