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Re: [rootsradicals] Re: Replaced Wideloaders with Sideboards

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  • Silivrenion
    Funny thing with this bike... it has such a natural ability to stay balanced with very little forward motion. I can take my feet off the ground, wind the
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 27, 2008
      Funny thing with this bike... it has such a natural ability to stay balanced with very little forward motion. I can take my feet off the ground, wind the pedals and directly go with no push off!

      Also, I am very happy that now I can actually reach the kickstand! I wasn't able to before because of the cloth wideloaders.

      The corners are a bit concerning to me. I will probably round them off when I get a chance before doing whatever paint job I will.

      On Sun, Apr 27, 2008 at 1:38 PM, Phil Good-Elliott <poppamando@...> wrote:

      Watch your heels and Achilles tendons when you push off/take off...
      that would be one concern for this set-up. You might also consider
      rounding off the corners facing out to reduce "bite" potential to
      others and yourself.

      I'm glad to see folks experimenting. I'd like to see something more
      like a running board, except split down the length and hinged so you
      could fold it out for a wider platform when desired. You could put
      pivoting stiffeners on the "inside" board for use when the extra width
      is folded down/out.

      -Phil



      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Silivrenion <silivrenion@...> wrote:
      >
      > Went out for a morning ride for breakfast, and took some pictures
      while I
      > was out. Check them out to see how the project looks so far!
      >
      > http://picasaweb.google.com/silivrenion/BicyclePictures
      >
      > The bike's a KHS Westwood with custom 700c/disc brakes, rigid fork,
      and a
      > mudflap attached to the rear for less-sloppy puddle riding.
      >
      > On Sun, Apr 27, 2008 at 2:38 AM, tda0818 <tda0818@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Sounds like an interesting project.
      > >
      > > Any stain will bleed at least a little under the stencil. The wood
      > > fibers will draw it along them. Your best bet among stains is
      > > probably one of the gel stains. It won't run, obviously, during
      > > application, and gel stains tend not to penetrate as deeply into the
      > > wood, so you'll get less bleeding.
      > >
      > > I don't know what kind of wood you used, but assuming it's a soft wood
      > > like pine or spruce (or the ever popular "whitewood"), which don't
      > > take stain very evenly, a gel stain won't look as blotchy.
      > >
      > > -- urbino
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com
      <rootsradicals%40yahoogroups.com>,

      > > Silivrenion <silivrenion@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > So today my project was to replace the wideloader cloths with wooden
      > > parts
      > > > to increase durability and allow people to stand on them easier.
      > > They look
      > > > great, however I will have pictures and reply to this topic with
      them
      > > > tomorrow with the current look of the project.
      > > >
      > > > The choice of wood was educated: greater than 6" wide and pressure
      > > treated.
      > > > Luckily I found a very large candidate for only $3.97 at HDepot.
      > > >
      > > > Purchased various hardware, all stainless steel. I used a 1/2"
      piping
      > > > attachment fixture from plumbing as a grasp, and attached it
      > > together with
      > > > machine screws, and washers to protect the wood from being damaged.
      > > I ran
      > > > into a problem where the 1" screw lengths were not long enough, so I
      > > > upgraded to a 1-1/2" screw.
      > > >
      > > > The project turned out OK with minor issues with fitting the
      1/2" piping
      > > > fixtures to the wood and the bars. I used stainless steel screws,
      > > washers,
      > > > and locking nuts to get the wood attached to the frame. I have also
      > > added
      > > > extra reflectors on the edges of the boards, because it occurs to me
      > > that a
      > > > gigantic bike with wooden planks can be quite dangerous to people
      > > not paying
      > > > attention. I assume this is a big reason why they aren't produced:
      > > it's so
      > > > extremely dangerous to ride around with them on because you are just
      > > so big.
      > > >
      > > > When mounted properly, they don't rattle at all like the
      footsies do!
      > > >
      > > > Soon I'll attempt to do a paint/design job on the tops of the board.
      > > > Painting on a PT board will be tough as I don't want to prime with
      > > something
      > > > that will disturb the natural look of the wood. I am considering
      using
      > > > stenciled stain, but I'm wondering if it will run or splotch
      under the
      > > > stencil to be used.
      > > >
      > > > More info and pics soon!
      > > >
      > > > --
      > > > Steve Morley
      > > > http://silivrenion.com
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Steve Morley
      > http://silivrenion.com
      >




      --
      Steve Morley
      http://silivrenion.com
    • Devian Gilbert
      the edges look dangerous i d at least round them off i d really hate to accidently glance someone s ankle/shin/etc... it wouldn t take much... that is for
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 27, 2008
        the edges look dangerous
        i'd at least round them off

        i'd really hate to accidently glance someone's ankle/shin/etc...
        it wouldn't take much... that is for sure.

        my two cents

        peace...d

        "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the human race." H.G. Wells


        On Apr 27, 2008, at 8:15 AM, Silivrenion wrote:

        Went out for a morning ride for breakfast, and took some pictures while I was out. Check them out to see how the project looks so far!

        http://picasaweb. google.com/ silivrenion/ BicyclePictures

        The bike's a KHS Westwood with custom 700c/disc brakes, rigid fork, and a mudflap attached to the rear for less-sloppy puddle riding.

        On Sun, Apr 27, 2008 at 2:38 AM, tda0818 <tda0818@yahoo. com> wrote:

        Sounds like an interesting project.

        Any stain will bleed at least a little under the stencil. The wood
        fibers will draw it along them. Your best bet among stains is
        probably one of the gel stains. It won't run, obviously, during
        application, and gel stains tend not to penetrate as deeply into the
        wood, so you'll get less bleeding.

        I don't know what kind of wood you used, but assuming it's a soft wood
        like pine or spruce (or the ever popular "whitewood"), which don't
        take stain very evenly, a gel stain won't look as blotchy.

        -- urbino



        --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, Silivrenion <silivrenion@ ...> wrote:
        >
        > So today my project was to replace the wideloader cloths with wooden
        parts
        > to increase durability and allow people to stand on them easier.
        They look
        > great, however I will have pictures and reply to this topic with them
        > tomorrow with the current look of the project.
        > 
        > The choice of wood was educated: greater than 6" wide and pressure
        treated.
        > Luckily I found a very large candidate for only $3.97 at HDepot.
        > 
        > Purchased various hardware, all stainless steel. I used a 1/2" piping
        > attachment fixture from plumbing as a grasp, and attached it
        together with
        > machine screws, and washers to protect the wood from being damaged.
        I ran
        > into a problem where the 1" screw lengths were not long enough, so I
        > upgraded to a 1-1/2" screw.
        > 
        > The project turned out OK with minor issues with fitting the 1/2" piping
        > fixtures to the wood and the bars. I used stainless steel screws,
        washers,
        > and locking nuts to get the wood attached to the frame. I have also
        added
        > extra reflectors on the edges of the boards, because it occurs to me
        that a
        > gigantic bike with wooden planks can be quite dangerous to people
        not paying
        > attention. I assume this is a big reason why they aren't produced:
        it's so
        > extremely dangerous to ride around with them on because you are just
        so big.
        > 
        > When mounted properly, they don't rattle at all like the footsies do!
        > 
        > Soon I'll attempt to do a paint/design job on the tops of the board.
        > Painting on a PT board will be tough as I don't want to prime with
        something
        > that will disturb the natural look of the wood. I am considering using
        > stenciled stain, but I'm wondering if it will run or splotch under the
        > stencil to be used.
        > 
        > More info and pics soon!
        > 
        > -- 
        > Steve Morley
        > http://silivrenion. com
        >




        -- 
        Steve Morley
        http://silivrenion. com


      • alexbknight
        I m experimenting with this stuff for logos etc: www.lazertran.com Alex
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 28, 2008
          I'm experimenting with this stuff for logos etc:

          www.lazertran.com

          Alex
        • Silivrenion
          I have a plan for the news few steps. I will be jigsawing the front outside corners of the platforms off and sanding them rounded. I will apply a clear
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 28, 2008
            I have a plan for the news few steps. I will be jigsawing the front outside corners of the platforms off and sanding them rounded. I will apply a clear polyurathane to the top and side surfaces (it's pressure treated wood, don't need to apply it there). I'll then have a friend do some flames on it. I'll also have him strip the snapdeck's paint off and put a nice stripe detailing on it!

            Will show pictures throughout!

            On Mon, Apr 28, 2008 at 4:29 AM, alexbknight <Alexbknight@...> wrote:

            I'm experimenting with this stuff for logos etc:

            www.lazertran.com

            Alex




            --
            Steve Morley
            http://silivrenion.com
          • kwikfile08
            Steve, I think your concept is good - But you may want to re-think the cut. Possibly cut them to match the shape of the WL s and drill small holes in the WL s
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 28, 2008
              Steve,

              I think your concept is good - But you may want to re-think the cut. Possibly cut them to
              match the shape of the WL's and drill small holes in the WL's themselves and secure with
              wood screws. This way the chance of getting your heel pinched as you hike-a-bike up
              steep terrain. Even with std WL's I have experienced "Heel Pinch" and Son of a %^$# it
              hurts! I know Ideas are like butts, every one has one. I just had to speak up only because
              your design can still be re-cut for this and look good. Like I said it is a great concept, It
              actually is inspiring me to try as well. Anyway - I said my piece, so I will shut up now.

              Carl


              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Silivrenion <silivrenion@...> wrote:
              >
              > So today my project was to replace the wideloader cloths with wooden parts
              > to increase durability and allow people to stand on them easier. They look
              > great, however I will have pictures and reply to this topic with them
              > tomorrow with the current look of the project.
              >
              > The choice of wood was educated: greater than 6" wide and pressure treated.
              > Luckily I found a very large candidate for only $3.97 at HDepot.
              >
              > Purchased various hardware, all stainless steel. I used a 1/2" piping
              > attachment fixture from plumbing as a grasp, and attached it together with
              > machine screws, and washers to protect the wood from being damaged. I ran
              > into a problem where the 1" screw lengths were not long enough, so I
              > upgraded to a 1-1/2" screw.
              >
              > The project turned out OK with minor issues with fitting the 1/2" piping
              > fixtures to the wood and the bars. I used stainless steel screws, washers,
              > and locking nuts to get the wood attached to the frame. I have also added
              > extra reflectors on the edges of the boards, because it occurs to me that a
              > gigantic bike with wooden planks can be quite dangerous to people not paying
              > attention. I assume this is a big reason why they aren't produced: it's so
              > extremely dangerous to ride around with them on because you are just so big.
              >
              > When mounted properly, they don't rattle at all like the footsies do!
              >
              > Soon I'll attempt to do a paint/design job on the tops of the board.
              > Painting on a PT board will be tough as I don't want to prime with something
              > that will disturb the natural look of the wood. I am considering using
              > stenciled stain, but I'm wondering if it will run or splotch under the
              > stencil to be used.
              >
              > More info and pics soon!
              >
              > --
              > Steve Morley
              > http://silivrenion.com
              >
            • Silivrenion
              Thanks! I am definitely considering between many different ideas right now, so that helps a lot! ... -- Steve Morley http://silivrenion.com
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 28, 2008
                Thanks! I am definitely considering between many different ideas right now, so that helps a lot!

                On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 1:18 AM, kwikfile08 <kwikfile08@...> wrote:


                Steve,

                I think your concept is good - But you may want to re-think the cut. Possibly cut them to
                match the shape of the WL's and drill small holes in the WL's themselves and secure with
                wood screws. This way the chance of getting your heel pinched as you hike-a-bike up
                steep terrain. Even with std WL's I have experienced "Heel Pinch" and Son of a %^$# it
                hurts! I know Ideas are like butts, every one has one. I just had to speak up only because
                your design can still be re-cut for this and look good. Like I said it is a great concept, It
                actually is inspiring me to try as well. Anyway - I said my piece, so I will shut up now.

                Carl



                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Silivrenion <silivrenion@...> wrote:
                >
                > So today my project was to replace the wideloader cloths with wooden parts
                > to increase durability and allow people to stand on them easier. They look
                > great, however I will have pictures and reply to this topic with them
                > tomorrow with the current look of the project.
                >
                > The choice of wood was educated: greater than 6" wide and pressure treated.
                > Luckily I found a very large candidate for only $3.97 at HDepot.
                >
                > Purchased various hardware, all stainless steel. I used a 1/2" piping
                > attachment fixture from plumbing as a grasp, and attached it together with
                > machine screws, and washers to protect the wood from being damaged. I ran
                > into a problem where the 1" screw lengths were not long enough, so I
                > upgraded to a 1-1/2" screw.
                >
                > The project turned out OK with minor issues with fitting the 1/2" piping
                > fixtures to the wood and the bars. I used stainless steel screws, washers,
                > and locking nuts to get the wood attached to the frame. I have also added
                > extra reflectors on the edges of the boards, because it occurs to me that a
                > gigantic bike with wooden planks can be quite dangerous to people not paying
                > attention. I assume this is a big reason why they aren't produced: it's so
                > extremely dangerous to ride around with them on because you are just so big.
                >
                > When mounted properly, they don't rattle at all like the footsies do!
                >
                > Soon I'll attempt to do a paint/design job on the tops of the board.
                > Painting on a PT board will be tough as I don't want to prime with something
                > that will disturb the natural look of the wood. I am considering using
                > stenciled stain, but I'm wondering if it will run or splotch under the
                > stencil to be used.
                >
                > More info and pics soon!
                >
                > --
                > Steve Morley
                > http://silivrenion.com
                >




                --
                Steve Morley
                http://silivrenion.com
              • Devian Gilbert
                if it where me... I d drill it full of holes, and insert brass ringlets into them... just like i did the snapdeck... what would be even better is maybe simply
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 28, 2008
                  if it where me...
                  I'd drill it full of holes, and insert brass ringlets into them...
                  just like i did the snapdeck...
                  what would be even better is maybe simply 2 old long board skateboards where used...

                  maybe... ???

                  its a good idea... I've thought about it a bunch too... but yet have come to commit to something like that.

                  ironic, cuz i mostly run round with the WideLoaders on anyways... as it seems that I'm grabbing all kinds of funky things to haul around.

                  the running board idea is great...
                  every time i look at something like that... I think to myself.... "wow, imagine how much stuff you can tie to it... only if it had holes".

                  heck...even nylon webbing would be good.  that stuff is crazy strong.

                  peace...d


                  "Every time I see an adult on a bicycle, I no longer despair for the human race." H.G. Wells


                  On Apr 28, 2008, at 10:18 PM, kwikfile08 wrote:


                  Steve,

                  I think your concept is good - But you may want to re-think the cut. Possibly cut them to 
                  match the shape of the WL's and drill small holes in the WL's themselves and secure with 
                  wood screws. This way the chance of getting your heel pinched as you hike-a-bike up 
                  steep terrain. Even with std WL's I have experienced "Heel Pinch" and Son of a %^$# it 
                  hurts! I know Ideas are like butts, every one has one. I just had to speak up only because 
                  your design can still be re-cut for this and look good. Like I said it is a great concept, It 
                  actually is inspiring me to try as well. Anyway - I said my piece, so I will shut up now. 

                  Carl

                  --- In rootsradicals@ yahoogroups. com, Silivrenion <silivrenion@ ...> wrote:
                  >
                  > So today my project was to replace the wideloader cloths with wooden parts
                  > to increase durability and allow people to stand on them easier. They look
                  > great, however I will have pictures and reply to this topic with them
                  > tomorrow with the current look of the project.
                  > 
                  > The choice of wood was educated: greater than 6" wide and pressure treated.
                  > Luckily I found a very large candidate for only $3.97 at HDepot.
                  > 
                  > Purchased various hardware, all stainless steel. I used a 1/2" piping
                  > attachment fixture from plumbing as a grasp, and attached it together with
                  > machine screws, and washers to protect the wood from being damaged. I ran
                  > into a problem where the 1" screw lengths were not long enough, so I
                  > upgraded to a 1-1/2" screw.
                  > 
                  > The project turned out OK with minor issues with fitting the 1/2" piping
                  > fixtures to the wood and the bars. I used stainless steel screws, washers,
                  > and locking nuts to get the wood attached to the frame. I have also added
                  > extra reflectors on the edges of the boards, because it occurs to me that a
                  > gigantic bike with wooden planks can be quite dangerous to people not paying
                  > attention. I assume this is a big reason why they aren't produced: it's so
                  > extremely dangerous to ride around with them on because you are just so big.
                  > 
                  > When mounted properly, they don't rattle at all like the footsies do!
                  > 
                  > Soon I'll attempt to do a paint/design job on the tops of the board.
                  > Painting on a PT board will be tough as I don't want to prime with something
                  > that will disturb the natural look of the wood. I am considering using
                  > stenciled stain, but I'm wondering if it will run or splotch under the
                  > stencil to be used.
                  > 
                  > More info and pics soon!
                  > 
                  > -- 
                  > Steve Morley
                  > http://silivrenion. com
                  >


                • tda0818
                  You might want to wait a couple years before putting a coat of polyurethane (or anything else) on pressure-treated lumber. PTL sweats excess preservative
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 28, 2008
                    You might want to wait a couple years before putting a coat of
                    polyurethane (or anything else) on pressure-treated lumber. PTL
                    "sweats" excess preservative for the first couple of years, which
                    usually causes any kind of paint or finish to flake off.

                    That wouldn't be a huge deal for your project, since it wouldn't take
                    long to put a new coat on. Just something to think about.

                    -- urbino


                    --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Silivrenion <silivrenion@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I have a plan for the news few steps. I will be jigsawing the front
                    outside
                    > corners of the platforms off and sanding them rounded. I will apply
                    a clear
                    > polyurathane to the top and side surfaces (it's pressure treated
                    wood, don't
                    > need to apply it there). I'll then have a friend do some flames on
                    it. I'll
                    > also have him strip the snapdeck's paint off and put a nice stripe
                    detailing
                    > on it!
                    >
                    > Will show pictures throughout!
                    >
                  • murray
                    another idea for the melting pot... wouldn t it be nice if they could snap on and off like the snapdeck does?
                    Message 9 of 18 , Apr 29, 2008
                      another idea for the melting pot... wouldn't it be nice if they could
                      'snap' on and off like the snapdeck does?
                    • Silivrenion
                      They can t snap on and off because of the shape the wideloaders are in. There s no attachment force to be able to keep it on the frame, especially under load,
                      Message 10 of 18 , Apr 29, 2008
                        They can't snap on and off because of the shape the wideloaders are in. There's no attachment force to be able to keep it on the frame, especially under load, and I think it would come off easy.

                        Maybe I should weather the wood a while before messing with it...

                        On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 5:11 AM, murray <murrayneill@...> wrote:

                        another idea for the melting pot... wouldn't it be nice if they could
                        'snap' on and off like the snapdeck does?




                        --
                        Steve Morley
                        http://silivrenion.com
                      • Cara Lin Bridgman
                        Why not? If the snaps hook to the forward end and aft end of the wide loaders. Insert wide loaders into freeradical, then snap on the boards. You d need two
                        Message 11 of 18 , Apr 29, 2008
                          Why not? If the snaps hook to the forward end and aft end of the wide
                          loaders. Insert wide loaders into freeradical, then snap on the boards.
                          You'd need two hooks on each end, so the boards don't shift sideways
                          and pop out. The trick is to get the snaps in the right place.
                          Stepping on the board would loosen the connection, but the boards
                          shouldn't fall through the wide loaders if you have them long enough.

                          Silivrenion wrote:
                          > They can't snap on and off because of the shape the wideloaders are in.
                          > There's no attachment force to be able to keep it on the frame,
                          > especially under load, and I think it would come off easy.
                        • Silivrenion
                          It wouldn t be able to use the snapdeck fasteners.. it would need some other removable connectors, but only because the wideloader shape is not exactly
                          Message 12 of 18 , Apr 29, 2008
                            It wouldn't be able to use the snapdeck fasteners.. it would need some other removable connectors, but only because the wideloader shape is not exactly rectangular.. it's more trapezoidal, especially right after the bends in the tubing. I am afraid if you used snapdeck snaps that there would be no tensile pressure to keep the boards in place as there is with the freeradical frame tubings.

                            On Tue, Apr 29, 2008 at 11:47 AM, Cara Lin Bridgman <cara.lin@...> wrote:

                            Why not? If the snaps hook to the forward end and aft end of the wide
                            loaders. Insert wide loaders into freeradical, then snap on the boards.
                            You'd need two hooks on each end, so the boards don't shift sideways
                            and pop out. The trick is to get the snaps in the right place.
                            Stepping on the board would loosen the connection, but the boards
                            shouldn't fall through the wide loaders if you have them long enough.



                            Silivrenion wrote:
                            > They can't snap on and off because of the shape the wideloaders are in.
                            > There's no attachment force to be able to keep it on the frame,
                            > especially under load, and I think it would come off easy.




                            --
                            Steve Morley
                            http://silivrenion.com
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