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Re: Tongue placement

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  • Sunny Keach
    I ve been flirting with putting the tongue under the chain stay, to get slacker angles.. I do know why the directions say not to. If the bolt that holds it in
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 2, 2008
      I've been flirting with putting the tongue under the chain stay, to get
      slacker angles.. I do know why the directions say not to. If the bolt
      that holds it in place or the chunk of aluminum it's connected to fail,
      it wont be cataclysmic, meaning that the x rests on the chainstay. If
      the bolt should fail with the x under the chainstay, then there is
      little to stop it from going straight to the ground, possibly at speed.
      that could be a bit ugly. So I am just planning to beef up that
      connection or put some sort of back up strap or cord around it just in case.
      sunny
    • Cara Lin Bridgman
      Yes, I visualized that sort of accident, too--gouging out tarmac at the very least. Thinking about it some more, though, I m wondering just how strong the
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 2, 2008
        Yes, I visualized that sort of accident, too--gouging out tarmac at the
        very least.

        Thinking about it some more, though, I'm wondering just how strong the
        forces are on that bolt. The real point of attachment is with the
        bike's drop-outs.

        On my Surly Instigator frame, the chain-stay bridge has a smaller
        diameter than the chain stays. Since the aluminum plate is supposed to
        bridge the chain stays, whether I put the tongue over or under the
        chain-stay bridge, I had a gap in the aluminum plate and the chain-stay
        bridge. This means, I found it really easy to bend the aluminum plate!
        In other words, that's what happens when you keep cranking the nut on
        that bolt... So, I bought a few back-up aluminum plates, but am still
        using the bent one (it has a slight but noticeable curve). To keep from
        bending it more or from bending future plates, I bought some steel
        washers with about the same diameter as the gap between chain-stays and
        stacked them to fill the space between chain-stay bridge and aluminum
        plate. It's all tight and I've not noticed any shifting of tongue,
        plate, or washers.

        CL

        Sunny Keach wrote:
        > I've been flirting with putting the tongue under the chain stay, to get
        > slacker angles.. I do know why the directions say not to. If the bolt
        > that holds it in place or the chunk of aluminum it's connected to fail,
        > it wont be cataclysmic, meaning that the x rests on the chainstay. If
        > the bolt should fail with the x under the chainstay, then there is
        > little to stop it from going straight to the ground, possibly at speed.
        > that could be a bit ugly. So I am just planning to beef up that
        > connection or put some sort of back up strap or cord around it just in case.
        > sunny
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