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Re: [rootsradicals] First Bad time on the X

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  • Cara Lin Bridgman
    More often than not, instincts and intuition are right on target! The problem is whether we listen to them or not. I found this on a website describing a
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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      More often than not, instincts and intuition are right on target! The
      problem is whether we listen to them or not. I found this on a website
      describing a horrific hiking trail, but it sure applies here:

      "[She] who knows when to stop does not find [herself] in trouble."
      --Third Wisdom of Tao

      I also like Morgan's recommendations about cell phones and license plates.

      My concern is: how are you going to handle getting home for the
      remaining four weeks of that job? Pepper spray and machetes?

      CL


      Anne Littlebird wrote:
      > Something started bothering me so I stopped riding. Felt really dumb and
      > like a small child but decided that my intuition was telling me
      > something. Nah, being childish. OK I'll be childish. Turned off the
      > lights, put on my dark green oilskin and dragged the bike over the
      > culvert and up the hill to the MTB path that runs along the golf course.
      > Being a tracker, on foot I can be in stealth mode but with the X a
      > little harder.
      >
      > So here I am a 50 year old woman in the woods in the dark with a 15 foot
      > bike thinking that the person in the truck is a weirdo. Cue the Bond
      > music. Nearly went back but still couldn't and I didn't want to get back
      > through the mud again in the culvert - I just want to be home! Boy was
      > I thinking stupid until I came over the top of the road and looked down
      > through the trees.
    • Nathan Klatt
      Wow! Please find an alternate route home for the next four weeks! Or at least one week or so. It s probably worth calling the police to talk to someone about
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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        Wow!

        Please find an alternate route home for the next four weeks! Or at
        least one week or so.

        It's probably worth calling the police to talk to someone about the
        incident and see what they recommend and, who knows, maybe they'll
        even patrol the area around that time for the next few days.

        Wow.

        Nathan
      • Forrest Halford
        If you were bundled up - and no way for the driver to tell if you were female - he might have thought you were a man out for a good time. Parks - especially
        Message 3 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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          If you were bundled up - and no way for the driver to tell if you
          were female - he might have thought you were a man out for a good
          time. Parks - especially late at night - are where gays sometimes
          cruise. This sounds like that type of behavior. yes, I would know.

          At any rate, I'm glad you are okay. I may be stating the obvious, but
          you need a cell phone (if you don't already have one).

          woo


          On Tue, 04 Dec 2007, Anne Littlebird wrote...

          >So here I am a 50 year old woman in the woods in the dark with a 15
          foot
          >bike thinking that the person in the truck is a weirdo.
          >Anne
          >
          >--
          >Anne Littlebird
          >Issumatuq Herbals
          >P.O. Box 5161
          >Louisville, KY 40255
          >502-418-1023
          >
          >


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        • Cara Lin Bridgman
          Woo, cruising for gays by sitting there in his truck with all the lights out? It s the fact he had the lights out that sounds like really bad news. Anne,
          Message 4 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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            Woo, cruising for gays by sitting there in his truck with all the lights
            out? It's the fact he had the lights out that sounds like really bad
            news.

            Anne, you've written one of the spookiest stories I've read for a while.

            CL

            Forrest Halford wrote:
            > If you were bundled up - and no way for the driver to tell if you
            > were female - he might have thought you were a man out for a good
            > time. Parks - especially late at night - are where gays sometimes
            > cruise. This sounds like that type of behavior. yes, I would know.
            >
            > At any rate, I'm glad you are okay. I may be stating the obvious, but
            > you need a cell phone (if you don't already have one).
            >
            > woo
            >
            >
            > On Tue, 04 Dec 2007, Anne Littlebird wrote...
            >
            >> So here I am a 50 year old woman in the woods in the dark with a 15
            > foot
            >> bike thinking that the person in the truck is a weirdo.
            >> Anne
          • Forrest Halford
            Well, not to delve too deeply into the unspoken yet widely understood rules of the subculture, but yes. been there, done that. Still, I can understand how it
            Message 5 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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              Well, not to delve too deeply into the unspoken yet widely
              understood 'rules' of the subculture, but yes. been there, done that.

              Still, I can understand how it would be scary and also acknowlege
              that the individual may have been up to something much more sinister.

              Woo

              On Tue, 04 Dec 2007, Cara Lin Bridgman wrote...

              >Woo, cruising for gays by sitting there in his truck with all the
              lights
              >out? It's the fact he had the lights out that sounds like really
              bad
              >news.
              >
              >Anne, you've written one of the spookiest stories I've read for a
              while.
              >
              >CL
              >
              >Forrest Halford wrote:
              >> If you were bundled up - and no way for the driver to tell if you
              >> were female - he might have thought you were a man out for a good
              >> time. Parks - especially late at night - are where gays sometimes
              >> cruise. This sounds like that type of behavior. yes, I would know.
              >>
              >> At any rate, I'm glad you are okay. I may be stating the obvious,
              but
              >> you need a cell phone (if you don't already have one).
              >>
              >> woo
              >>
              >>
              >> On Tue, 04 Dec 2007, Anne Littlebird wrote...
              >>
              >>> So here I am a 50 year old woman in the woods in the dark with a
              15
              >> foot
              >>> bike thinking that the person in the truck is a weirdo.
              >>> Anne
              >
              >


              --------------------------------------------------------------------

              .......__o ....O
              .......\<, .....\-/\-
              ....( )/ ( ) ....(O)^(O)
            • Devian Gilbert
              i agree with everyone you need a cell phone since i ve moved to SoCal and especially my trips to Los Angeles i ve discovered the power of a digital camera! i
              Message 6 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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                i agree with everyone 
                you need a cell phone

                since i've moved to SoCal
                and especially my trips to Los Angeles
                i've discovered the power of a digital camera!

                i almost always carry one just to take pics
                but now, i've learned how powerful it really is.
                you just need to have it at the ready for quick response
                and put the settings to something that will work in the conditions.

                at night i like a fast shutter speed, ISO 400 or more, and the flash set at its highest.

                you can also simply go to the Police Dept and let them know your route & schedule
                in Pacific Grove, Ca, where i use to live, i knew a few of the cops, and they all knew who i was.
                samething...get off work at 11pm go home.
                often i'd get an escort
                or one of my buddies was working so i'd actually stop and chit chat a bit at the window of the black and white

                as a cyclist, i cant overstate, "Cops are your friends".
                go out of your way to make good, all friendly like with the PD.

                last week or so, i scored a nice new tripod off of Craigslist for $10!
                so there i was, at 830-930pm on the xtra riding with all my lights into Saticoy
                historically Saticoy has had a bunch of gang activity
                i rode over to this nice lady's house to get the tripod
                stopped at the Buddhist Temple that i had yet to see
                and home...
                all the while a cop was circling near by.
                and i always wave
                and i always make myself VERY APPARENT.

                as you have said, its pretty easy to turn off the lights and disappear

                on lights...
                i use Light and Motion stuff
                on the handle bar i use a Vega, usually running in strobe mode.
                on my helmet i use an HID unit
                and on the seatpost i use a big white blinkie

                even once i got home, a cop car was coming up the street with its lights off.
                once they saw me, turned their lights on, i waved, and they drove off.

                i know lights can be expensive
                but put it this way...
                i just gave away my old Halogen set up that i had been using for a good solid 7yrs!
                so with that said....good lights are a VERY GOOD INVESTMENT.

                more on lights...
                a helmet light is a crazy thing!
                most lights you can command traffic with
                they are so bright, that all you have to do is look at a car and the interior is lit up
                its even better for the digi cam
                tinted windows?
                no problem, see right thru them...

                be careful 
                make nice with the cops
                use good lights
                carry a cell phone
                and if your schedule/route is routine...
                a stalker will figure that out right away...
                so your defense is the PD
                you can even call PD before you leave work.
                if PD is on that road when you ride, you more than likely will not have a problem

                peace..d

                On Dec 4, 2007, at 2:52 AM, Anne Littlebird wrote:

                Well the first 3 months of using the X as my sole transport has really 
                been quite good. I still shock people with all the stuff I can get from 
                the store and I'm feeling great! That being said Sunday was a night I 
                don't really want to repeat.

                I have a second job - not much longer! - where I work 4 pm to midnight 
                on Sunday. Normally the ride home at that time is fine. Never see any 
                traffic except for the odd police car changing shifts at the substation 
                not far from the apartment. The ride itself is about 5 miles - the last 
                1/2 mile up one of those endless hills. I am not a night person so it's 
                not my idea of a good job anyway much less getting home after a rough 
                evening. I'm tired.

                Storms came through early but of course the X can carry the extra gear 
                no problem so I had everything I needed in case it was raining and more 
                layers since the temp was supposed to drop from 60 to 30. Well I was 
                lucky and the rain stopped but the winds were really bad and gusting to 
                about 25 mph when I started for home.

                Some of the cross blasts at the intersections pushed the bike sideways a 
                little but I was just a little annoyed. It's weather and I can't do 
                anything about it so just ride. About 2 miles into the ride I was 
                avoiding an LG&E truck fixing a downed power line when a large branch 
                came off a tree and hit right in front of me. brakes were a little too 
                wet and I hit it. It flipped and flung itself into the chain and back 
                wheel bringing the Hawk to a dead stop. Of course it's on a dark stretch 
                and I can't see very well - must get a better headlight. Couldn't pull 
                it out so I had to break it off in several pieces to disengage it from 
                the bike. Luckily everything was fine and I went on.

                As I was going through the park a pickup passed me going the other way. 
                Slowed down and nearly stopped - odd, since it was after midnight and it 
                was in the darkest park of the road. He/she had tinted windows so i have 
                no idea who was in the truck. Fine with that until he turned around and 
                came back and passed me really slowly again. Finally went on.

                Something started bothering me so I stopped riding. Felt really dumb and 
                like a small child but decided that my intuition was telling me 
                something. Nah, being childish. OK I'll be childish. Turned off the 
                lights, put on my dark green oilskin and dragged the bike over the 
                culvert and up the hill to the MTB path that runs along the golf course. 
                Being a tracker, on foot I can be in stealth mode but with the X a 
                little harder.

                So here I am a 50 year old woman in the woods in the dark with a 15 foot 
                bike thinking that the person in the truck is a weirdo. Cue the Bond 
                music. Nearly went back but still couldn't and I didn't want to get back 
                through the mud again in the culvert - I just want to be home! Boy was 
                I thinking stupid until I came over the top of the road and looked down 
                through the trees.

                This is where normally I run the down hill to build up steam for the 
                long up. The park road goes around a dark sharp curve but there's a bike 
                lane and at midnight there are no runners out so I can really get up to 
                speed. Ah well when I looked down here is the truck stopped parked on 
                the bike lane and all his lights are turned off. With the wet brakes and 
                my normal speed I'd have quite possibly slammed in the back of the 
                truck. I waited a few minutes to see what he was up to - finally a man 
                got out of the car and walked to the back of the truck looking around 
                the curve of the road.

                So now I was pissed. I have no idea what he was up to and I'm glad I 
                didn't find out, Might have been innocent - right - but I decided to 
                pick my way over the top and through the woods for the rest of the ride. 
                Would have been easier on foot in the dark - I'm used to that but hard 
                with the X.

                By the time I got home the adrenaline was still running. Normal ride 
                takes me 20 for that 5 miles - Sunday it took well over an hour. Finally 
                got to bed and slept 3 hours before I had to get up to go to work.

                The up side though yesterday morning I didn't have to stand outside and 
                scrape car windows! It was 30 degrees and all I had to do was get on the 
                X and cycle to work. I was awake fully by the time I got to work 
                although I started fading about 2 pm.

                4 more weeks of that job and I'm done.

                Anne

                -- 
                Anne Littlebird
                Issumatuq Herbals
                P.O. Box 5161
                Louisville, KY 40255
                502-418-1023


              • Bruce Hallman
                ... Another reason might be that they were amazed to see your Xtracycle. I know that whenever I see one I slow down and look twice! ( I saw one yesterday
                Message 7 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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                  On Dec 4, 2007 2:52 AM, Anne Littlebird <issumatuq@...> wrote:

                  > As I was going through the park a pickup passed me going the other way.
                  > Slowed down and nearly stopped - odd,


                  Another reason might be that they were amazed to see your Xtracycle.

                  I know that whenever I see one I slow down and look twice!

                  ( I saw one yesterday evening, 6PM on Judah St. in San Francisco.)
                • David Chase
                  ... The main theme here is: must get a better headlight . Creepy guy or not, you cannot overdrive your lights on a bicycle, no matter how much fun it is to
                  Message 8 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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                    On 2007-12-04, at 5:52 AM, Anne Littlebird wrote:
                    > Of course it's on a dark stretch and I can't see very well - must
                    > get a better headlight.
                    > This is where normally I run the down hill to build up steam for the
                    > long up. The park road goes around a dark sharp curve but there's a
                    > bike
                    > lane and at midnight there are no runners out so I can really get
                    > up to
                    > speed. Ah well when I looked down here is the truck stopped parked on
                    > the bike lane and all his lights are turned off. With the wet
                    > brakes and
                    > my normal speed I'd have quite possibly slammed in the back of the
                    > truck.
                    >

                    The main theme here is: "must get a better headlight". Creepy guy or
                    not, you cannot overdrive your lights on a bicycle, no matter how
                    much fun it is to go fast.

                    You could get a CatEye EL530 -- I have the earlier model, it is
                    almost good enough, and the 530 is supposed to be (and should be,
                    given technology) 50% better. Runs on 4AA cells. Seems to be about
                    $40.

                    Another choice, if you already have a regular flashlight with a bulb
                    that is not good enough, is a replacement LED bulb:

                    http://www.ledsupply.com/evflbu.php

                    It also costs $40, works with as little as two AA cells (though it
                    will run those down relatively quickly -- on the other hand, you can
                    carry spare batteries, and get a couple of chargers, one for work,
                    the other for home, and you need that anyway, for either the CatEye
                    or the replacement bulb). I have a "red" in a old crappy AA
                    flashlight; for your purposes, a yellow might be best (yellow and red
                    give better battery life, are kinder to your night vision, and yellow
                    is appropriate front or rear). You get your choice of colors,
                    depending on which one you buy (classic has 5 choices, lambertian has
                    6 -- classic is for focusing flashlights, lambertian is for fixed-
                    focus cheapies).

                    The issue of color has to do with your night vision, using it, versus
                    preserving it.

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luminosity_function

                    A "lumen" is a fudged measure of light power, intended to model how
                    our eyes respond to light. Problem is, we see differently in bright
                    light, and in the dark, and "white" lights get credit for dumping
                    energy into the cyan-to-blue end of the spectrum. You can "see
                    great", but you can only see what you illuminuate. If you use yellow
                    or red (wavelength greater than 600 nanometers) then you do not use
                    your night vision, but you also do not trash your night vision. If
                    you are riding in urban areas, "white" might be better because your
                    night vision is trashed already anyhow, and you want to be
                    conspicuous, and it helps you see. If you are in the boonies, yellow
                    might be the better choice, because you can use your night vision for
                    peripheral stuff, and the yellow for what you really need to see.
                    Yellow (aka "amber") LEDs are 590 nanometers, so they're pretty
                    good. Red-orange (617 nm) would be even better for your night
                    vision, but less good for your regular vision, and not a good match
                    for a headlight (red-orange is a GREAT tail-light -- very conspicious).

                    David
                  • Bruce Hallman
                    ... I am still working on my poor-man s Xtracycle project, I have the frame built now (photos in a couple days). Now, I am scheming the panniers. It occurs
                    Message 9 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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                      On Dec 4, 2007 9:21 AM, David Chase <dr2chase@...> wrote:


                      > The main theme here is: "must get a better headlight".

                      I am still working on my 'poor-man's Xtracycle' project, I have the
                      frame built now (photos in a couple days).

                      Now, I am scheming the panniers. It occurs to me to mount a small 12V
                      motorcycle battery (5 lbs) down low, and then us it to power a really
                      powerful LED headlight and taillight.

                      Considering that Xtracycle's don't have the same limitation that force
                      other bikes to use wimpy AA battery lights, why not go big?

                      Like this:

                      http://glo-brite.com/heavy_duty/part.cfm?part_id=119746B8-5BA6-9C89-0BBD15C8589E81A6


                      And, maybe that 12V battery could power, a 'downlow' light, and a
                      small amplifier for tunes.
                    • Mighk Wilson
                      ... our eyes respond to light. Problem is, we see differently in bright light, and in the dark, and white lights get credit for dumping energy into the
                      Message 10 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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                        David wrote:
                        >> A "lumen" is a fudged measure of light power, intended to model how
                        our eyes respond to light. Problem is, we see differently in bright
                        light, and in the dark, and "white" lights get credit for dumping energy
                        into the cyan-to-blue end of the spectrum. You can "see great", but you
                        can only see what you illuminate. If you use yellow or red (wavelength
                        greater than 600 nanometers) then you do not use your night vision, but
                        you also do not trash your night vision. << etc

                        Excellent and "eye opening" information, David! I would add, if it
                        wasn't already obvious, that having a red headlight will confuse
                        motorists into thinking you're heading away from them; generally not a
                        good thing!

                        Of course a helmet light compensates for the problem you note by being
                        pointed where you're looking. But a low-mounted headlight does a better
                        job of showing you where the potholes are.

                        Years ago I made a very bright helmet light by buying a relatively cheap
                        lead acid rechargeable battery and wiring it to a Cat Eye halogen light,
                        replacing the 3W bulb with a 6W, then velcroing the light to my helmet
                        and carrying the battery in a water-bottle holder with a belt strap. It
                        worked pretty good except that it the bulb would sometimes melt the lamp
                        reflector if I stood still too long (no cooling airflow and the
                        reflector was not designed for those temperatures). Technology has come
                        so far in the last few years; now I'm using a Blackburn X3, which I'm
                        quite happy with (and which has been updated to X4 --
                        http://www.blackburndesign.com/lights.html ).

                        Mighk
                      • Someone Else
                        There were plenty of good suggestions about what to do in the future regarding this...I can give you a bit of insight on the law enforcement aspect. While this
                        Message 11 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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                          There were plenty of good suggestions about what to do in the future regarding this...I can give you a bit of insight on the law enforcement aspect. 

                          While this event is over and in the past, you could talk to an officer from your jurisdiction about it, just to give them a heads up.  In all reality, they will tell you to call the moment you see a person/event like this.  Otherwise, all they can do is get past info instead of handling the problem when it's there. 

                          Having a cell phone is a good thing.  Make sure you have your police agency's 7-digit (or 10 digit) emergency AND non-emergency phone number programmed into it.  Based on where you are, you may have to be transfered to the correct agency who handles the area you are in.  This can give you a delay, sometimes of 10-30 minutes or more....which will only serve to frustrate you, make you more anxious, and make it harder to get help. 

                          Know what location you are at AT ALL TIMES.  Try to get used to orienting yourself with N/S/E/W directions.  Know the streets names making up the closest intersection.  If you do have to call, you will need to let them know where you need help....and most people have no clue during urgent situations.  Again, the more delay, the harder it is to get help. 

                          License plates help, but also get as much description as possible.  Sometimes the subject may not be in a car.  Also, advise if you want contact with the responding officer...it may help to calm your nerves, and some agencies don't do it unless you ask.

                          Lights do help, in terms of others can see you.  I have a helmet light (light and motion ARC), two cheapie front blinkie lights, 4 blinkie red lights in the back, and illuminite jacket.  The majority of my riding is at night (due to working night shift - around 10-11 pm) and I actually prefer riding then.  Less traffic, no bars along my routes, mostly just crossing paths with SDPD units leaving their station.  Some have told me I should ride around with a knife/maglite/some item to protect me if I need it.  In all honesty, most of the time I ride, there are few people out driving around, much less walking.  I'm 6' tall, usually have my hair tucked in, and while I'm not saying it couldn't happen to me, the chance of it happening is not very likely.  If someone really wants to catch up to me, knock me off my bike, turn out all my lights, take what little cash I carry around, and do all sorts of other random stuff, I'm not going to have much chance of stopping them.  Really, it's knowing what is around you, following your gut instinct, and trying to avoid incidents before they get a chance to start.  Sometimes, I'm surprised that I don't have more incidents like this happening to me or other people.  Most people fall into the rut of the same route, same time, same actions.....if you are the paranoid type, it can lead to others knowing your habits, and exploiting them.  But that's probably just the law enforcement mindset in me thinking of things can get worse. 


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                        • akyramoto
                          I would also recommend attending a self defense or martial arts class if possible. Know it least something about how to defend yourself I believe will help
                          Message 12 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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                            I would also recommend attending a self defense or martial arts class
                            if possible. Know it least something about how to defend yourself I
                            believe will help immensely. If not buy yourself a kubaton & learn
                            how to use it. Basically if some one is going to attack you or
                            assault you, they're not expecting you to be trained. They'll be in
                            for a surprise & you better your chances of getting away.


                            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Someone Else <slew_footing@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > There were plenty of good suggestions about what to do in the future
                            regarding this...I can give you a bit of insight on the law
                            enforcement aspect.
                            >
                            > While this event is over and in the past, you could talk to an
                            officer from your jurisdiction about it, just to give them a heads up.
                            In all reality, they will tell you to call the moment you see a
                            person/event like this. Otherwise, all they can do is get past info
                            instead of handling the problem when it's there.
                            >
                            > Having a cell phone is a good thing. Make sure you have your police
                            agency's 7-digit (or 10 digit) emergency AND non-emergency phone
                            number programmed into it. Based on where you are, you may have to be
                            transfered to the correct agency who handles the area you are in.
                            This can give you a delay, sometimes of 10-30 minutes or more....which
                            will only serve to frustrate you, make you more anxious, and make it
                            harder to get help.
                            >
                            > Know what location you are at AT ALL TIMES. Try to get used to
                            orienting yourself with N/S/E/W directions. Know the streets names
                            making up the closest intersection. If you do have to call, you will
                            need to let them know where you need help....and most people have no
                            clue during urgent situations. Again, the more delay, the harder it
                            is to get help.
                            >
                            > License plates help, but also get as much description as possible.
                            Sometimes the subject may not be in a car. Also, advise if you want
                            contact with the responding officer...it may help to calm your nerves,
                            and some agencies don't do it unless you ask.
                            >
                            > Lights do help, in terms of others can see you. I have a helmet
                            light (light and motion ARC), two cheapie front blinkie lights, 4
                            blinkie red lights in the back, and illuminite jacket. The majority
                            of my riding is at night (due to working night shift - around 10-11
                            pm) and I actually prefer riding then. Less traffic, no bars along my
                            routes, mostly just crossing paths with SDPD units leaving their
                            station. Some have told me I should ride around with a
                            knife/maglite/some item to protect me if I need it. In all honesty,
                            most of the time I ride, there are few people out driving around, much
                            less walking. I'm 6' tall, usually have my hair tucked in, and while
                            I'm not saying it couldn't happen to me, the chance of it happening is
                            not very likely. If someone really wants to catch up to me, knock me
                            off my bike, turn out all my lights, take what little cash I carry
                            around, and do all sorts of other random stuff, I'm not going to have
                            much chance of
                            > stopping them. Really, it's knowing what is around you, following
                            your gut instinct, and trying to avoid incidents before they get a
                            chance to start. Sometimes, I'm surprised that I don't have more
                            incidents like this happening to me or other people. Most people fall
                            into the rut of the same route, same time, same actions.....if you are
                            the paranoid type, it can lead to others knowing your habits, and
                            exploiting them. But that's probably just the law enforcement mindset
                            in me thinking of things can get worse.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            ____________________________________________________________________________________
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                            > Text or chat with friends inside Yahoo! Mail. See how.
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                            >
                          • Anne Littlebird
                            Ok so I ll fill in the details now since I was remiss in this aspect. And I wasn t scared just annoyed because I really wanted to get home and get to bed. It
                            Message 13 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
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                              Ok so I'll fill in the details now since I was remiss in this aspect.
                              And I wasn't scared just annoyed because I really wanted to get home and
                              get to bed. It takes a lot to scare me but I am cautious. And I listen
                              to my intuition.

                              Just to let everyone know - law enforcement was called. They know me
                              pretty well since I am doing any environmental study in the park and I
                              let them know I would be out there at times in the dark. The substation
                              is actually only a mile and a half away from where I was - although
                              you'd never know it. That was why I waited and watched the guy - however
                              he left before they got there. I chose to take the long route home
                              through the park on the MTB trails after that just in case he was
                              waiting around the other side. Unfortunately the officer was not happy
                              that I didn't have the license plate number. It was too dark and I
                              couldn't make it out. This is the one place on the route that has no
                              street lamps.

                              I did not have the benefit of my usual officer who is really great and
                              always comes when I need help with the homeless guys I sort of keep an
                              eye on - one of the guys is severely epileptic and I worry about him now
                              that it is cold. This jockey wanted to give me a lecture on why a young
                              lady was stupid to be riding at midnight in the park in the first place.
                              Uh huh. He didn't offer to follow me the last 2 miles home. Hence taking
                              the overland route. I cracked up over the young lady part though.

                              I do have a cell phone and I also possess a large hunting knife which
                              has come in handy on numerous occasions when things needed to be cut. My
                              martial arts teacher made sure I could disable someone if needed and my
                              ex made sure I knew how to use a knife. Although everyone assumes I'm a
                              little bitty weakling. Hee,hee.

                              Any one here also knows that if you are going to pick up either guys or
                              girls that this is not the place. There are other places in the park for
                              that where there is more traffic, particularly on Friday and Saturday
                              nights.

                              And while I will wax lyrical about the X, after midnight on a dark road
                              was not the time to extol it's virtues - if that's what he wanted me to do.

                              In 4 more weeks I will not have to take that route at night. And I will
                              be happy. Unfortunately where I live I can take that route for 5 miles
                              or go the only other way and it's 8. And I'm a weenie after 10 pm. I
                              admit it.

                              Annie

                              Someone Else wrote:
                              > There were plenty of good suggestions about what to do in the future
                              > regarding this...I can give you a bit of insight on the law
                              > enforcement aspect.
                              >
                              > While this event is over and in the past, you could talk to an officer
                              > from your jurisdiction about it, just to give them a heads up. In all
                              > reality, they will tell you to call the moment you see a person/event
                              > like this. Otherwise, all they can do is get past info instead of
                              > handling the problem when it's there.
                              >
                              > Having a cell phone is a good thing. Make sure you have your police
                              > agency's 7-digit (or 10 digit) emergency AND non-emergency phone
                              > number programmed into it. Based on where you are, you may have to be
                              > transfered to the correct agency who handles the area you are in. This
                              > can give you a delay, sometimes of 10-30 minutes or more....which will
                              > only serve to frustrate you, make you more anxious, and make it harder
                              > to get help.
                              >
                              > Know what location you are at AT ALL TIMES. Try to get used to
                              > orienting yourself with N/S/E/W directions. Know the streets names
                              > making up the closest intersection. If you do have to call, you will
                              > need to let them know where you need help....and most people have no
                              > clue during urgent situations. Again, the more delay, the harder it is
                              > to get help.
                              >
                              > License plates help, but also get as much description as possible.
                              > Sometimes the subject may not be in a car. Also, advise if you want
                              > contact with the responding officer...it may help to calm your nerves,
                              > and some agencies don't do it unless you ask.
                              >
                              > Lights do help, in terms of others can see you. I have a helmet light
                              > (light and motion ARC), two cheapie front blinkie lights, 4 blinkie
                              > red lights in the back, and illuminite jacket. The majority of my
                              > riding is at night (due to working night shift - around 10-11 pm) and
                              > I actually prefer riding then. Less traffic, no bars along my routes,
                              > mostly just crossing paths with SDPD units leaving their station. Some
                              > have told me I should ride around with a knife/maglite/some item to
                              > protect me if I need it. In all honesty, most of the time I ride,
                              > there are few people out driving around, much less walking. I'm 6'
                              > tall, usually have my hair tucked in, and while I'm not saying it
                              > couldn't happen to me, the chance of it happening is not very likely.
                              > If someone really wants to catch up to me, knock me off my bike, turn
                              > out all my lights, take what little cash I carry around, and do all
                              > sorts of other random stuff, I'm not going to have much chance of
                              > stopping them. Really, it's knowing what is around you, following your
                              > gut instinct, and trying to avoid incidents before they get a chance
                              > to start. Sometimes, I'm surprised that I don't have more incidents
                              > like this happening to me or other people. Most people fall into the
                              > rut of the same route, same time, same actions.....if you are the
                              > paranoid type, it can lead to others knowing your habits, and
                              > exploiting them. But that's probably just the law enforcement mindset
                              > in me thinking of things can get worse.
                              >
                              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              > Be a better sports nut! Let your teams follow you with Yahoo Mobile.
                              > Try it now.
                              > <http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=51731/*http://mobile.yahoo.com/sports;_ylt=At9_qDKvtAbMuh1G1SQtBI7ntAcJ%20>
                              >
                              >

                              --
                              Anne Littlebird
                              Issumatuq Herbals
                              P.O. Box 5161
                              Louisville, KY 40255
                              502-418-1023
                            • tda0818
                              Sounds like you know what you re doing, Annie, and handled it just poifect. Good on you. As a general matter, I very much second akyra s suggestion that
                              Message 14 of 18 , Dec 4, 2007
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Sounds like you know what you're doing, Annie, and handled it just
                                poifect. Good on you.

                                As a general matter, I very much second akyra's suggestion that anyone
                                cycling should learn some fundamentals of self-defense. A lot of
                                martial arts schools offer them one night a week for people who don't
                                want to learn a martial art, but want to have some idea what to do.

                                You can learn the basics -- how to separate from an attacker and get
                                away, or separate, drop the attacker and get away -- in just a few
                                lessons, and you'll be amazed at how much that does for your peace of
                                mind. (Depending on the school, you might also be amazed at how much
                                overlap there is between good cycling technique and good martial arts
                                technique.)

                                I think the hunting knife is a good idea, too, Annie -- both as a
                                weapon if necessary, and as just a handy tool to have with you. At
                                some point, I'm going to get a Ka-Bar military knife. They're not
                                that expensive, are seriously intimidating to an attacker,
                                practically indestructible, and can be used for anything from opening
                                a can to cutting down small trees to signaling rescuers (if you get
                                the shiny blade).

                                --urbino


                                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Anne Littlebird <issumatuq@...>
                                wrote:
                                >
                                > Ok so I'll fill in the details now since I was remiss in this aspect.
                                > And I wasn't scared just annoyed because I really wanted to get home
                                and
                                > get to bed. It takes a lot to scare me but I am cautious. And I listen
                                > to my intuition.
                                >
                                > Just to let everyone know - law enforcement was called. They know me
                                > pretty well since I am doing any environmental study in the park and I
                                > let them know I would be out there at times in the dark. The substation
                                > is actually only a mile and a half away from where I was - although
                                > you'd never know it. That was why I waited and watched the guy -
                                however
                                > he left before they got there. I chose to take the long route home
                                > through the park on the MTB trails after that just in case he was
                                > waiting around the other side. Unfortunately the officer was not happy
                                > that I didn't have the license plate number. It was too dark and I
                                > couldn't make it out. This is the one place on the route that has no
                                > street lamps.
                                >
                                > I did not have the benefit of my usual officer who is really great and
                                > always comes when I need help with the homeless guys I sort of keep an
                                > eye on - one of the guys is severely epileptic and I worry about him
                                now
                                > that it is cold. This jockey wanted to give me a lecture on why a young
                                > lady was stupid to be riding at midnight in the park in the first
                                place.
                                > Uh huh. He didn't offer to follow me the last 2 miles home. Hence
                                taking
                                > the overland route. I cracked up over the young lady part though.
                                >
                                > I do have a cell phone and I also possess a large hunting knife which
                                > has come in handy on numerous occasions when things needed to be
                                cut. My
                                > martial arts teacher made sure I could disable someone if needed and my
                                > ex made sure I knew how to use a knife. Although everyone assumes I'm a
                                > little bitty weakling. Hee,hee.
                                >
                                > Any one here also knows that if you are going to pick up either guys or
                                > girls that this is not the place. There are other places in the park
                                for
                                > that where there is more traffic, particularly on Friday and Saturday
                                > nights.
                                >
                                > And while I will wax lyrical about the X, after midnight on a dark road
                                > was not the time to extol it's virtues - if that's what he wanted me
                                to do.
                                >
                                > In 4 more weeks I will not have to take that route at night. And I will
                                > be happy. Unfortunately where I live I can take that route for 5 miles
                                > or go the only other way and it's 8. And I'm a weenie after 10 pm. I
                                > admit it.
                                >
                                > Annie
                                >
                              • Sue
                                Working as a 911 dispatcher and being an ex cop I feel I need to pass this on. #1. Yes, always have a cell phone with you. If you re like me and don t want to
                                Message 15 of 18 , Dec 7, 2007
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Working as a 911 dispatcher and being an ex cop I feel I need to pass this on.
                                   
                                  #1. Yes, always have a cell phone with you. If you're like me and don't want to spend $600 a year on a phone get one that is pay as you go. Always have enough minutes on it for those emergency calls and keep it charged. Or if you have an old cell phone that has no service attached, you can still dial 911. We just wont be able to call you back if the phone disconnects.
                                   
                                  #2. Don't rely on a GPS phone to pinpoint where you are. Yes GPS is good but not perfect. Especially if you can't talk. Please, please, please if you are in a situation where you can't talk on the phone you have to try. 911 centers get open line cell phone calls all the time. Usually because someone has the phone in their pocket and it accidentally dials, (most keypad locks don't apply to the #9 which is often the pre-set speed dial for 911), or a baby has the phone and is using it as a chew toy. If we do not hear anything suspicious on the other end the call is disconnected. If we have a call back number we will try to call it back. If there is no answer or we get voice mail that is were the processing of that call ends as we don't have enough to believe it should be pursued any further. So if you need help do what ever you can to make that clear.
                                   
                                  #3. Whether you have GPS or not keep track of where you are. Role play as you're riding. "Ok if I was to get in trouble right here, or witness someone else in trouble, how would I describe my location to 911?" 
                                   
                                  #4. If you ever call 911 on a cell phone ask for the police dept or fire dept you want. Because of the nature of cell phones you're call could ring into a 911 center that does not service the actual area you are calling from. (On 9/11, bouncing calls rang into our center in Colorado. On really cloudy days we sometime get calls bouncing from WY.). If you don't know the jurisdiction you are in, or think you know but aren't sure...do not guess. Give your location and let the 911 call taker determine which police, fire or EMS needs to be sent.
                                   
                                  #5. Always, always, always trust your gut instinct. 9 times out of 10 we don't find anything, but that one time is the time that counts. Never feel dumb or feel like your putting us out and for goodness sake do not apologize. It is what we are here for.
                                   
                                  I hope this information is helpful.
                                   
                                  Sue  
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  Sent: Tuesday, December 04, 2007 3:52 AM
                                  Subject: [rootsradicals] First Bad time on the X

                                  Well the first 3 months of using the X as my sole transport has really
                                  been quite good. I still shock people with all the stuff I can get from
                                  the store and I'm feeling great! That being said Sunday was a night I
                                  don't really want to repeat.

                                  I have a second job - not much longer! - where I work 4 pm to midnight
                                  on Sunday. Normally the ride home at that time is fine. Never see any
                                  traffic except for the odd police car changing shifts at the substation
                                  not far from the apartment. The ride itself is about 5 miles - the last
                                  1/2 mile up one of those endless hills. I am not a night person so it's
                                  not my idea of a good job anyway much less getting home after a rough
                                  evening. I'm tired.

                                  Storms came through early but of course the X can carry the extra gear
                                  no problem so I had everything I needed in case it was raining and more
                                  layers since the temp was supposed to drop from 60 to 30. Well I was
                                  lucky and the rain stopped but the winds were really bad and gusting to
                                  about 25 mph when I started for home.

                                  Some of the cross blasts at the intersections pushed the bike sideways a
                                  little but I was just a little annoyed. It's weather and I can't do
                                  anything about it so just ride. About 2 miles into the ride I was
                                  avoiding an LG&E truck fixing a downed power line when a large branch
                                  came off a tree and hit right in front of me. brakes were a little too
                                  wet and I hit it. It flipped and flung itself into the chain and back
                                  wheel bringing the Hawk to a dead stop. Of course it's on a dark stretch
                                  and I can't see very well - must get a better headlight. Couldn't pull
                                  it out so I had to break it off in several pieces to disengage it from
                                  the bike. Luckily everything was fine and I went on.

                                  As I was going through the park a pickup passed me going the other way.
                                  Slowed down and nearly stopped - odd, since it was after midnight and it
                                  was in the darkest park of the road. He/she had tinted windows so i have
                                  no idea who was in the truck. Fine with that until he turned around and
                                  came back and passed me really slowly again. Finally went on.

                                  Something started bothering me so I stopped riding. Felt really dumb and
                                  like a small child but decided that my intuition was telling me
                                  something. Nah, being childish. OK I'll be childish. Turned off the
                                  lights, put on my dark green oilskin and dragged the bike over the
                                  culvert and up the hill to the MTB path that runs along the golf course.
                                  Being a tracker, on foot I can be in stealth mode but with the X a
                                  little harder.

                                  So here I am a 50 year old woman in the woods in the dark with a 15 foot
                                  bike thinking that the person in the truck is a weirdo. Cue the Bond
                                  music. Nearly went back but still couldn't and I didn't want to get back
                                  through the mud again  in the culvert - I just want to be home! Boy was
                                  I thinking stupid until I came over the top of the road and looked down
                                  through the trees.

                                  This is where normally I run the down hill to build up steam for the
                                  long up. The park road goes around a dark sharp curve but there's a bike
                                  lane and at midnight there are no runners out  so I can really get up to
                                  speed. Ah well when I looked down here is the truck stopped parked on
                                  the bike lane and all his lights are turned off. With the wet brakes and
                                  my normal speed I'd have quite possibly slammed in the back of the
                                  truck. I waited a few minutes to see what he was up to - finally a man
                                  got out of the car and walked to the back of the truck looking around
                                  the curve of the road.

                                  So now I was pissed. I have no idea what he was up to and I'm glad I
                                  didn't find out, Might have been innocent - right - but I decided to
                                  pick my way over the top and through the woods for the rest of the ride.
                                  Would have been easier on foot in the dark - I'm used to that but hard
                                  with the X.

                                  By the time I got home the adrenaline was still running. Normal ride
                                  takes me 20 for that 5 miles - Sunday it took well over an hour. Finally
                                  got to bed and slept 3 hours before I had to get up to go to work.

                                  The up side though yesterday morning I didn't have to stand outside and
                                  scrape car windows! It was 30 degrees and all I had to do was get on the
                                  X and cycle to work. I was awake fully by the time I got to work
                                  although I started fading about 2 pm.

                                  4 more weeks of that job and I'm done.

                                  Anne

                                  --
                                  Anne Littlebird
                                  Issumatuq Herbals
                                  P.O. Box 5161
                                  Louisville, KY 40255
                                  502-418-1023



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