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Re: [rootsradicals] The Eagle Has Landed!

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  • Bruce Hallman
    ... Wow. Yes, thank goodness for helmets. They really work!
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 2, 2007
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      On Dec 1, 2007 9:35 PM, Morgan Scherer <morganes@...> wrote:

      > stopped my bike as I was going 18 mph. I got flung over the handlebars
      > and landed on my head/shoulder in the road. Thank goodness for helmets!

      Wow. Yes, thank goodness for helmets. They really work!
    • Anne Littlebird
      I ve had several near misses the last few days - people are more distracted with the holidays I think. It s time to be more than extra careful. Anne ... --
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 2, 2007
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        I've had several near misses the last few days - people are more
        distracted with the holidays I think. It's time to be more than extra
        careful.

        Anne

        David Morrison wrote:
        >
        > Yah, the LBS which put mine together is not really local to me either
        > and not a self-evident ride, though I think I can map a route and call
        > it an adventure :). Fortunately the bike shop had a pickup, otherwise
        > I was going to have call on a buddy with a pickup for a favor. I was
        > thinking of even taking on the Metro, which allows bikes, until I was
        > told ( in very no-nonsense and bureaucratic terms) that bike on the
        > metro could be no longer than 80 inches long.
        >
        >
        > Used it for the first time to get groceries today. My first trip on
        > the bike when I would have used the car previously :). Without the
        > hassle of looking for a parking space and traffic etc, it took about
        > the same amount of time :). One negative thing though, when I passed
        > through one of the major intersections I had crossed just twenty or
        > twenty-five minutes before on the way to the grocery store there was a
        > ambulance and a several EMTs....working on a downed cyclist who
        > appeared to have been struck by an SUV. He or she was not sitting up
        > and the only way I knew it was a cyclist is from the mangled bike I
        > saw. I didn't stop to look or stare, but prayed a little for the
        > rider. I love my bike. I love the freedom, the speed, the utility if
        > the X, the boost it gives my heart, lungs and spirit.....everything
        > really. But its scenes like that which make me remember how much we
        > need to keep our wits when we ride.
        >
        > DCM
        >
        > On Nov 30, 2007, at 9:09 PM, tda0818 wrote:
        >
        >> You're looking at the semi-anonymous Yahoo profile of a proud new X
        >> owner!
        >>
        >> The good folks at X had the Townie 21 shipped directly to my mechanic,
        >> and when the Free Radical arrived at my apartment this afternoon, I
        >> loaded it up, drove out to the shop, and watched the guy assemble it.
        >> (Sorry, no birth video.)
        >>
        >> It was kind of an interesting experience. When he started building
        >> it, he was in kind of a bad mood about it, for reasons having to do
        >> with miscommunication between him and the shop manager. Anyway, once
        >> he got the real wheel off the Townie (which he'd already fully built),
        >> glanced at the instructions and held the FR frame up where it would
        >> fit, he got this big grin on his face and said, "This thing is a trip!"
        >>
        >> The longer he worked on it, the better his mood got. By the time he
        >> was done, he was more excited about it than I was. There are 3 bike
        >> shops closer than his, but he told me he'd love to work on it whenever
        >> I have anything done. Talking about the other shops, he said, "Yeah,
        >> when you roll this thing into any bike shop in town, they're gonna
        >> love it."
        >>
        >> My only problem now is: I can't figure out how to get it home! There
        >> isn't a safe route to ride it home from there, and it sure as hell
        >> won't fit in my car. I'm gonna have to rent a truck or something.
        >> The guy at the LBS was happy to keep it on their floor for a few days
        >> -- he said it'd be the talk of the shop. (And I left the little info
        >> cards with it and told him to hand them out to anybody who was
        >> interested.)
        >>
        >> One other thing. I'm going to search the archives on this, but the
        >> mechanic did think I should ask around about how people are keeping
        >> the chain from slapping around so much. He figured somebody had come
        >> up with something that would bolt on at the rear dropou ts of the
        >> Townie frame and provide some tension on the chain. If anybody has,
        >> I'd love to hear about it.
        >>
        >> Woohoo!
        >>
        >> --urbino
        >>
        >
        >

        --
        Anne Littlebird
        Issumatuq Herbals
        P.O. Box 5161
        Louisville, KY 40255
        502-418-1023
      • Juergen Weichert
        A nice solution to the attention is to always carry a pair of footsies along. When they cry out nice bike! you stop and smile and offer them a ride. Always a
        Message 3 of 18 , Dec 2, 2007
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          A nice solution to the attention is to always carry a pair of footsies
          along. When they cry out "nice bike!" you stop and smile and offer them
          a ride. Always a winner - once around the block and they will be hooked. :-)
          J


          tda0818 wrote:
          >
          > Thanks, d!
          >
          > It was pretty cool, all the way around. The guys at the bike shop had
          > been cruising the X website since last night, and they were STOKED.
          > They all wanted to have a turn riding it around the parking lot before
          > we left. They said customers had been admiring and asking about it
          > all morning.
          >
          > Then, just before we got back to my place, we rode past the ballet
          > school, where some students were standing around outside after
          > practice, and one of them hollered, "Nice bike!" as I cruised past (at
          > the back of the pack and pretty well gassed, but still rolling).
          >
          > If there are any X reps reading, your creation is an enthusiastic HIT
          > so far in Memphis.
          >
          > --urbino
          >
        • Tone
          Urbino, Chain tension can sometimes be a problem, especially when your gears and/or chain get slightly worn down and you are cranking hard up an incline. These
          Message 4 of 18 , Dec 2, 2007
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            Urbino,

                        Chain tension can sometimes be a problem, especially when your gears and/or chain get slightly worn down and you are cranking hard up an incline. These days I no longer have a multiple gearing on my rear wheel, but instead have opted to go single-speed with a Surly Singleator. The chain tension was still a bit of a problem, but my old bike shop popped open the Singleator removed the spring and manually tightened it up before replacing it.

                        The single speed set up of my bike is most likely NOT something most cargo-hauling Xtracyclists will want to do, but maybe there might be a way of tensing up the spring in a rear derailleur. Also, I have seen a photo of an Xtracycle with a much simpler solution to chain tension. Connect a short bungee cord between the rear derailleur and the rear-step of the FreeRadical frame. I have not tried this myself, but it seems to be pretty sensible.

            _TONE_

             

          • tda0818
            Zip ties: is there anything they can t do? --urbino ... mark
            Message 5 of 18 , Dec 2, 2007
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              Zip ties: is there anything they can't do?

              --urbino

              --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Cara Lin Bridgman <caralinb@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Ouch! Glad you're all right!
              >
              > I had a problem with my rear fender (aluminum at the time). The screw
              > holding it into place came loose and the fender swung around and under
              > the wheel. I'd heard the rattling, but blamed it on a loose snap-deck,
              > since I'd bumped over a few curbs. It happened about 2 years ago. I
              > was probably doing about 40 kph (24 mph) at the time. The 5 m skid
              mark
              > is still on the road. Everything is now reinforced with zip-ties.
              >
              > CL
              >
            • tda0818
              Excellent info as usual, Tone. Thanks! My mechanic did mention that a better rear derailleur (than the stock low-end Shimano on the Townie) would provide
              Message 6 of 18 , Dec 2, 2007
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                Excellent info as usual, Tone. Thanks!

                My mechanic did mention that a better rear derailleur (than the stock
                low-end Shimano on the Townie) would provide better tension. I have
                some short bungies, so I think I'll give that approach a try.

                --urbino

                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Tone" <Tone@...> wrote:
                >
                > Urbino,
                > Chain tension can sometimes be a problem, especially when
                > your gears and/or chain get slightly worn down and you are cranking hard
                > up an incline. These days I no longer have a multiple gearing on my rear
                > wheel, but instead have opted to go single-speed with a Surly
                > Singleator. The chain tension was still a bit of a problem, but my old
                > bike shop popped open the Singleator removed the spring and manually
                > tightened it up before replacing it.
                > The single speed set up of my bike is most likely NOT
                > something most cargo-hauling Xtracyclists will want to do, but maybe
                > there might be a way of tensing up the spring in a rear derailleur.
                > Also, I have seen a photo of an Xtracycle with a much simpler solution
                > to chain tension. Connect a short bungee cord between the rear
                > derailleur and the rear-step of the FreeRadical frame. I have not tried
                > this myself, but it seems to be pretty sensible.
                > _TONE_
                >
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