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Re: Kona Cargo bike

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  • Michael Lemberger
    ... I think what s posted on Kona s site is pretty preliminary. There s more info over on Bike Hugger:
    Message 1 of 22 , Sep 7, 2007
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      on Sep 6, 2007 Tone wrote:

      > It costs $800 USD, and unless I am reading the specs wrong, it only
      > has front brakes(?)! It also looks like their web page is buggy
      > because a number of the links to the right do not seem to display
      > correctly.

      I think what's posted on Kona's site is pretty preliminary. There's
      more info over on Bike Hugger:

      <http://bikehugger.com/2007/08/more_on_konas_ute.htm>

      ...looks like it will have a rear v-brake. I'm not sure why you'd mix
      brake technologies on a production bike, but I guess it's been done
      before (with U-brakes and cantilevers on early mountain bikes, for
      example.)

      > I find it funny how there seems to be a number of companies coming
      > out with cargo-style bikes. now that Xtracycle has really pushed
      > the market first. Of course it is nice to know major bicycle
      > manufacturers are appreciating the value of a bicycle for
      > practical, work, and hauling purposes.

      I agree that this is a positive direction for bicycle technology, and
      I give Xtracycle a ton of credit for pushing utilitarian longbikes
      into the mainstream. Of course, like many things in cycling, it's not
      an entirely new technology: <http://clevercycles.com/?p=7>

      > I will certainly stick with the Xtracycle or the Big Dummy when it
      > comes out though. At least I know Surly collaborated with Xtracycle
      > to tweak all the design kinks out of the Big Dummy before releasing
      > it. I also really like how the Free Radical's design allows it to
      > be adaptable for different uses depending on what Xtracycle-brand
      > or retrofitted attachments are put on.

      I agree that the Free Radical and Big Dummy designs offer a more
      flexible platform than the Kona design. I don't necessarily think
      that it's a one-size-fits-all solution though, and Kona's bike may be
      more appropriate for some people's needs. I hope Kona's entry into
      this part of the market becomes part of a rising tide that will lift
      all boats.

      Cheers,

      Michael (Mauricio B.) Lemberger
      Madison, WI
      sconnyboy.blogspot.com
    • David Chase
      Looking at the two sites, and looking at the picture, and considering our recent discussion on tires, I think one problem with this bike is that it might not
      Message 2 of 22 , Sep 7, 2007
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        Looking at the two sites, and looking at the picture, and considering
        our
        recent discussion on tires, I think one problem with this bike is
        that it
        might not support really large (2.35 inch) tires, and it might have
        limited
        clearance for snow tires. There's a post extending between the rear
        stays (in the picture) that ought not be quite so long as it is in
        the picture.

        On 2007-09-07, at 10:57 AM, Michael Lemberger wrote:
        > I think what's posted on Kona's site is pretty preliminary. There's
        > more info over on Bike Hugger:
        > <http://bikehugger.com/2007/08/more_on_konas_ute.htm>
        >
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