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Carrying Pizza on an Xtracycle

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  • Ty Smith
    So I decided one of the things I wanted to do once I got the Xtracycle set up was to go get my own pizza on the bike. I could have done it with the CETMA five
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 15, 2014

    So I decided one of the things I wanted to do once I got the Xtracycle set up was to go get my own pizza on the bike. I could have done it with the CETMA five rail rack on the front, but it would have been more awkward.


    The main issue with going to get your own pizza is coming back with it warm. I don't mind cold pizza the next day, but hate it when I first get it from the pizza place. So first step was to get my own pizza bag. I  did extensive research on the subject - basically went to Amazon and spent five minutes looking at reviews, and got this one.


    Next step was going into the realm of invention. I knew the bag would keep it warm, but I wanted it go come home piping hot. What to do? I got the idea to get a warming pack from a pet bed we have. It has an heavy round plastic insert that is microwaved and radiates heat for a couple of hours. I wanted to get one  that fits well in a pizza box, so found this one that is designed for people who take casseroles to pot lucks, church socials., etc. It only cost $10.

     

    Then I got a medium sized pizza box from the good folks at my local Papa John's and crudely put a bunch of venting holes on top.

    Inline image 1 It is the right size for the warming pack. It won't move around too much. The warming pack assembly goes in the pizza bag, and the fresh pizza goes on top. Heat rises and all that…

     

    Since the pizza bag is soft, I kept a couple of large pizza boxes from the last run to give it some stability. I put those on top of the warming pack, put it in the pizza bag, cargo netted the whole thing to the deck of my Free Radical, ordered two pizzas (buy one, get one free night) and off I rode the two miles to Papa Johns.

     

    The Pizza guy did a double-take when he saw my pizza bag and was quite impressed by it.  "I can 't believe no one else thinks of this!" he said. He was also impressed by my improvised warming technology.

    Inline image 2


    I put the fresh pizza in the bag and headed home.  FYI - temps were in the low 50's. When I got home and pulled out the first piece I was immediately rewarded with piping hot pizza! The wife, who usually rolls her eyes at my ideas had to admit this was a good one.  We kept the pizza in the warming bag and took slices out as we needed them. The best part was the pizza stayed hot until we finally put the leftovers in the fridge. The only down side is that I ate almost twice as much pizza as usual. My excuse was the pipinghotedness of it was hard to resist and I did ride to go get it!!

     

    In any case, if you like pizza, I highly recommend you adopt my method. Even if you go by car <shudder> it still is nice to have it stay hot all night.


    Ty

     

     

     























    Sent from my iThing

  • Jeff Youngstrom
    Nice. I just bungie pizza boxes to my snapdeck, but my pizza place is only 3 blocks away. ... Nice. I just bungie pizza boxes to my snapdeck, but my pizza
    Message 2 of 4 , Apr 15, 2014
      Nice.

      I just bungie pizza boxes to my snapdeck, but my pizza place is only 3 blocks away.


      On Tue, Apr 15, 2014 at 8:33 AM, Ty Smith <tyjedi@...> wrote:
       
      [Attachment(s) from Ty Smith included below]

      So I decided one of the things I wanted to do once I got the Xtracycle set up was to go get my own pizza on the bike. I could have done it with the CETMA five rail rack on the front, but it would have been more awkward.


      The main issue with going to get your own pizza is coming back with it warm. I don't mind cold pizza the next day, but hate it when I first get it from the pizza place. So first step was to get my own pizza bag. I  did extensive research on the subject - basically went to Amazon and spent five minutes looking at reviews, and got this one.


      Next step was going into the realm of invention. I knew the bag would keep it warm, but I wanted it go come home piping hot. What to do? I got the idea to get a warming pack from a pet bed we have. It has an heavy round plastic insert that is microwaved and radiates heat for a couple of hours. I wanted to get one  that fits well in a pizza box, so found this one that is designed for people who take casseroles to pot lucks, church socials., etc. It only cost $10.

       

      Then I got a medium sized pizza box from the good folks at my local Papa John's and crudely put a bunch of venting holes on top.

      Inline image 1 It is the right size for the warming pack. It won't move around too much. The warming pack assembly goes in the pizza bag, and the fresh pizza goes on top. Heat rises and all that…

       

      Since the pizza bag is soft, I kept a couple of large pizza boxes from the last run to give it some stability. I put those on top of the warming pack, put it in the pizza bag, cargo netted the whole thing to the deck of my Free Radical, ordered two pizzas (buy one, get one free night) and off I rode the two miles to Papa Johns.

       

      The Pizza guy did a double-take when he saw my pizza bag and was quite impressed by it.  "I can 't believe no one else thinks of this!" he said. He was also impressed by my improvised warming technology.

      Inline image 2


      I put the fresh pizza in the bag and headed home.  FYI - temps were in the low 50's. When I got home and pulled out the first piece I was immediately rewarded with piping hot pizza! The wife, who usually rolls her eyes at my ideas had to admit this was a good one.  We kept the pizza in the warming bag and took slices out as we needed them. The best part was the pizza stayed hot until we finally put the leftovers in the fridge. The only down side is that I ate almost twice as much pizza as usual. My excuse was the pipinghotedness of it was hard to resist and I did ride to go get it!!

       

      In any case, if you like pizza, I highly recommend you adopt my method. Even if you go by car <shudder> it still is nice to have it stay hot all night.


      Ty

       

       

       























      Sent from my iThing


    • David Backeberg
      This is really nice. New Haven, CT is a big pizza town. I d played around with the design to the Pizza Loader (google it), and did something quite similar
      Message 3 of 4 , Apr 15, 2014
        This is really nice. New Haven, CT is a big pizza town. I'd played around with the design to the Pizza Loader (google it), and did something quite similar using Ikea parts. That design wasn't quite satisfying. It was very stable, but didn't do anything to keep the pizza warm, and also didn't reduce jostling from road bumps as much as I would like.

        Your solution is less woodcraft, and probably better in the end as far as the condition of the pizza when you get it home. Thanks for the recommendation on the pizza bag!


        On Tue, Apr 15, 2014 at 11:33 AM, Ty Smith <tyjedi@...> wrote:
         
        [Attachment(s) from Ty Smith included below]

        So I decided one of the things I wanted to do once I got the Xtracycle set up was to go get my own pizza on the bike. I could have done it with the CETMA five rail rack on the front, but it would have been more awkward.


        The main issue with going to get your own pizza is coming back with it warm. I don't mind cold pizza the next day, but hate it when I first get it from the pizza place. So first step was to get my own pizza bag. I  did extensive research on the subject - basically went to Amazon and spent five minutes looking at reviews, and got this one.


        Next step was going into the realm of invention. I knew the bag would keep it warm, but I wanted it go come home piping hot. What to do? I got the idea to get a warming pack from a pet bed we have. It has an heavy round plastic insert that is microwaved and radiates heat for a couple of hours. I wanted to get one  that fits well in a pizza box, so found this one that is designed for people who take casseroles to pot lucks, church socials., etc. It only cost $10.

         

        Then I got a medium sized pizza box from the good folks at my local Papa John's and crudely put a bunch of venting holes on top.

        Inline image 1 It is the right size for the warming pack. It won't move around too much. The warming pack assembly goes in the pizza bag, and the fresh pizza goes on top. Heat rises and all that…

         

        Since the pizza bag is soft, I kept a couple of large pizza boxes from the last run to give it some stability. I put those on top of the warming pack, put it in the pizza bag, cargo netted the whole thing to the deck of my Free Radical, ordered two pizzas (buy one, get one free night) and off I rode the two miles to Papa Johns.

         

        The Pizza guy did a double-take when he saw my pizza bag and was quite impressed by it.  "I can 't believe no one else thinks of this!" he said. He was also impressed by my improvised warming technology.

        Inline image 2


        I put the fresh pizza in the bag and headed home.  FYI - temps were in the low 50's. When I got home and pulled out the first piece I was immediately rewarded with piping hot pizza! The wife, who usually rolls her eyes at my ideas had to admit this was a good one.  We kept the pizza in the warming bag and took slices out as we needed them. The best part was the pizza stayed hot until we finally put the leftovers in the fridge. The only down side is that I ate almost twice as much pizza as usual. My excuse was the pipinghotedness of it was hard to resist and I did ride to go get it!!

         

        In any case, if you like pizza, I highly recommend you adopt my method. Even if you go by car <shudder> it still is nice to have it stay hot all night.


        Ty

         

         

         























        Sent from my iThing


      • Ty Smith
        Thanks! I had looked at the pizza load er hack and thought
        Message 4 of 4 , Apr 17, 2014
          Thanks!

          I had looked at the pizza loader hack and thought it was pretty cool, but didn't like that it needed to be on the bike all the time. It seemed to me that would limit passenger carrying scenarios, and would make carrying tall items in the freeloaders difficult at best. I also didn't want my bike to be that wide all the time as I have a pretty tight series of twists and turns getting the bike in and out of my house. On the plus side, I saw a few pics online of people carrying really big items and the pizza loader's large width made it easier.

          Another factor for me is that I generally just buy a standard large pizza, so the box doesn't overhang by all that much. With the cargo net, it seems pretty secure and little chance of a crushed box when it is inside the bag. I might have considered the pizza loader idea more if I were getting really big pizzas all the time. 

          Oh, and my two pizza's didn't seem to get sloshed around coming home with them and I do go over a few bumps. I think them fitting inside their box helps as well as the pizza bag fits them pretty snugly. The one I got fits three regular sized pizzas, so with my warming tray and two larges, they fit just fine. If I were to get just one pizza, I would keep one extra box empty box in there just so they didn't move around much.

          Anyway, thanks again for the comment! Glad you liked it.

          Ty


          On Tue, Apr 15, 2014 at 5:15 PM, David Backeberg <dbackeberg@...> wrote:
           

          This is really nice. New Haven, CT is a big pizza town. I'd played around with the design to the Pizza Loader (google it), and did something quite similar using Ikea parts. That design wasn't quite satisfying. It was very stable, but didn't do anything to keep the pizza warm, and also didn't reduce jostling from road bumps as much as I would like.

          Your solution is less woodcraft, and probably better in the end as far as the condition of the pizza when you get it home. Thanks for the recommendation on the pizza bag!


          On Tue, Apr 15, 2014 at 11:33 AM, Ty Smith <tyjedi@...> wrote:
           
          [Attachment(s) from Ty Smith included below]

          So I decided one of the things I wanted to do once I got the Xtracycle set up was to go get my own pizza on the bike. I could have done it with the CETMA five rail rack on the front, but it would have been more awkward.


          The main issue with going to get your own pizza is coming back with it warm. I don't mind cold pizza the next day, but hate it when I first get it from the pizza place. So first step was to get my own pizza bag. I  did extensive research on the subject - basically went to Amazon and spent five minutes looking at reviews, and got this one.


          Next step was going into the realm of invention. I knew the bag would keep it warm, but I wanted it go come home piping hot. What to do? I got the idea to get a warming pack from a pet bed we have. It has an heavy round plastic insert that is microwaved and radiates heat for a couple of hours. I wanted to get one  that fits well in a pizza box, so found this one that is designed for people who take casseroles to pot lucks, church socials., etc. It only cost $10.

           

          Then I got a medium sized pizza box from the good folks at my local Papa John's and crudely put a bunch of venting holes on top.

          Inline image 1 It is the right size for the warming pack. It won't move around too much. The warming pack assembly goes in the pizza bag, and the fresh pizza goes on top. Heat rises and all that…

           

          Since the pizza bag is soft, I kept a couple of large pizza boxes from the last run to give it some stability. I put those on top of the warming pack, put it in the pizza bag, cargo netted the whole thing to the deck of my Free Radical, ordered two pizzas (buy one, get one free night) and off I rode the two miles to Papa Johns.

           

          The Pizza guy did a double-take when he saw my pizza bag and was quite impressed by it.  "I can 't believe no one else thinks of this!" he said. He was also impressed by my improvised warming technology.

          Inline image 2


          I put the fresh pizza in the bag and headed home.  FYI - temps were in the low 50's. When I got home and pulled out the first piece I was immediately rewarded with piping hot pizza! The wife, who usually rolls her eyes at my ideas had to admit this was a good one.  We kept the pizza in the warming bag and took slices out as we needed them. The best part was the pizza stayed hot until we finally put the leftovers in the fridge. The only down side is that I ate almost twice as much pizza as usual. My excuse was the pipinghotedness of it was hard to resist and I did ride to go get it!!

           

          In any case, if you like pizza, I highly recommend you adopt my method. Even if you go by car <shudder> it still is nice to have it stay hot all night.


          Ty

           

           

           























          Sent from my iThing



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