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RE: [rootsradicals] New documentary

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  • Tone
    Ted, Since you say you know Tim and Sally, the maker s of the What a Way to Go documentary, do you know if they want to have their film available for rent
    Message 1 of 22 , Aug 21 10:35 AM
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      Ted,

                  Since you say you know Tim and Sally, the maker’s of the “What a Way to Go” documentary, do you know if they want to have their film available for rent through Netflix? When my friend recommended the movie to me my first response was to check to see if I could put add it to my Netflix Q. I have gotten to see a number of independent not so easy to come by documentaries that way. Unfortunately it does not appear as if Netflix carries the title, but I did put in for a request for them to carry it. I figured having the documentary on Netflix would make it extremely convenient and available to millions of possible audience members, who might not be able to see it. I do not know how Netflix arranges distribution deal, but I would imagine it would also be financially worth it for Tim and Sally.

      _TONE_

       

    • Mark Garvey
      ... TONE! WAY WAY cool ride man! I LOVE it and on a Single speed! WOW! But I too have discovered that riding a bike is not necessarily how FAST you get
      Message 2 of 22 , Aug 21 5:46 PM
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        On 8/20/07, Tone <Tone@...> wrote:

        On 80 miles of mostly rural trail over the course of several hours, you do not want to take a chance… Toilet paper, don't leave home without it!



        TONE!  WAY WAY cool ride man!  I LOVE it and on a Single speed!  WOW!  But I too have discovered that riding a bike is not necessarily how FAST you get somewhere because the JOURNEY is what you are there for!  If it were me, I would stake out a camping spot somewhere about halfway home or maybe closer to the event if possible, stop on the way, set up the tent and then continue on and ride back to the camp.  Or better yet, if you are into gorilla camping, you can find a secluded spot and set up a hidden bivouac somewhere.  In my truck driving, I know a few spots where I can stop and sleep if I wish with no one bothering me!  Maybe in Baltimore it might be different, but around here it wouldn't be difficult to find a spot to lay a sleeping bag!  (a friend uses cemetaries!  slip in, find a secluded place, roll the bag out and sleep out of sight, then scarper just about dawn!)

        Personally I think the X was MADE to be a super tourer!

        mark

        Putting the fun in dysfunctional for over 50 years!


        Mark  Garvey
        Cedar Rapids, Iowa free state!

        Check out the web site at:
        http://www.vine-ave.com  

        contact us to have INVISIBLE INC! appear at your next program!  Details at www.vine-ave.com

        I am a bicycling lifestylist!
      • Pete B
        On a similar note, here in Melbourne (Australia not Florida) recently, Moreland BUG hosted a film night where they screened a
        Message 3 of 22 , Aug 22 1:26 AM
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          On a similar note, here in Melbourne (Australia not Florida) recently, 
          Moreland BUG hosted a film night where they screened a copy of "The Power
          of Community: How Cuba Survived Peak Oil" http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0814275/

          It looks at Cuba as an example of how the way we live may have to change when
          the world's demand for oil finally outstrips maximum production.

          In Cuba's case, the removal of cheap subsidized oil from the soviet system
          was the catalyst for a major re-think on how Cuban society functioned. Almost
          counter intuitively, transport was NOT the biggest problem they had to resolve.

          A bit of a one-sided documentary that IMHO didn't ask enough tough questions,
          but well worth a viewing.

          --
          Rgds
          Pete

          ---- Tone < Tone@...> wrote:
          > A good friend of mine just recommended a new independent
          > documentary film, called "What a Way to Go - Life at the end of Empire."
          > It has to do with the peak-oil crisis, global warming, human population
          > growth, the environment, and the social-political structure contributing
          > to all the problems. Apart from what my friend told me along with the
          > film's two previews and web site, I do not know all the details, but it
          > looks appealing, and I thought Xtracyclers might find it interesting.
          > Has anyone seen it? Here is a link to the site's QuickTime formatted
          > trailers:
          http://www.whatawaytogomovie.com/trailers/#
          > <http://www.whatawaytogomovie.com/trailers/>
          > _TONE_
          >
          >
        • Rainbow Flight
          Hi Pete I was at the Community Solutions Conference in 2005 when they launched the doco, and bought a copy as soon as it became available. I ve shown it to our
          Message 4 of 22 , Aug 22 2:36 AM
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            Hi Pete
            I was at the Community Solutions Conference in 2005 when they launched the doco, and bought a copy as soon as it became available. I've shown it to our peak oil groups and others here.
             
            I also explained to them the rest of the story that the film makers told us at the launch. They said through tears, that the Cubans had a really really tough time, and most simply stopped having children for about 15 years. A lot were fleeing the country over that period due to starvation. The way the Cubans treated the US film makers with amazing kindness and hospitality, regardless of how tough and shameful the US governments embargo on them was, appeared to be very humbling.
             
            The film makers wanted to paint a positive picture of what could be done with community, but admitted that Cuba was a special case, as the revolution was still going on on the streets, and there was solid community networks to make the switch to organic growing and urban permaculture possible. The reality of what's happening in the 'developed' world may make it difficult to impossible/improbable for the same social cohesion to kick in and support people as the manure hits the wind farm. The message I got from them was 'we' in the 'developed' world had better get our act togeather, build community as fast as possible, and do whatever we can to prepare for the shit-storm...they pretty much agreed that the US was screwed and not ready.....
             
            Their responce is "Plan C – Our strategy of culture change, conservation and curtailment." http://www.communitysolution.org/solutions.html
            I think this is great, except their transport 'solution' is the "Smart Jitney" http://www.communitysolution.org/transport.html  not bicycles, and I doubt they have ever mentioned transpot/utility bikes...
             
            I came back to New Zealand, and bought an Xtracycle! Yee hah!
             
            Their latest conference is happening in October:"Planning For Hard Times" http://www.communitysolution.org/conference.html
             ....I'll be in the US over that time and was really hoping to go to it, but financially I now doubt I can do it.
             
            Tim and Sally's doco is in a different class again. Very powerful and confrontive, but for me as a fan of Daniel Quinn and Derrick Jensen, I really loved it, its awesome.
             
            Regards
            Ted
             
             
          • Tone
            Hey guys, You guys know I recently biked 116 miles on my Xtracycle to and from Baltimore within a day. Well, if I did not mention it already my butt and hands
            Message 5 of 22 , Aug 26 3:56 PM
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              Hey guys,

                          You guys know I recently biked 116 miles on my Xtracycle to and from Baltimore within a day. Well, if I did not mention it already my butt and hands were sore for a couple of days afterward. It is really too bad I had totally forgotten the slip-on gel seat cushion I had packed away during my recent move. I actually bought that cushion exactly for the purpose of long touring rides, but simply forgot about it. You better believe the next time I ride down to Baltimore I will remember to pad my saddle!

                          Unfortunately, that still leaves my palms feeling quite tender and out of whack, even though I usually wear padded cycling gloves. The day I biked to Baltimore the rain soaked into the padding, so I think that may have caused the padded gloves to be somewhat pointless. Whatever the issue, I decided to do something about it.

                          I actually did not have any bar tape or grips on my handlebars, so clearly that was a major factor to the pain I felt in my palms following the 116 mile ride. However, while working as a messenger in NYC I got used to not having crap on my handlebars because anything I put on them would just wear down then rip and flake away. Besides, the unusual shape of my handlebars makes it difficult to install grips correctly or properly wrap bar tape.

                          Regardless, after biking the 116 miles I felt handlebar tape or grips would just not be sufficient. I decided to try something a little bit more extreme. My downstairs neighbor recently got one of those 12’ diameter 4’ deep inflatable ring pools for our backyard, which got me thinking. Upon a visit to a local “Dollar General” store, for only $1.50 I returned home with one of those 5’ long foam noodles. With the help of a utility blade to cut the noodle lengthwise down one side along with some 2” wide one-wrap style Velcro straps I usually carry in my Freeloaders anyway, I got some rather interesting results. Check this out and tell me what you think…

               

              http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromFront.jpg

               

              http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromRear.jpg

               

              http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromSeat.jpg

               

                          Do you guys think it is too absurd? I already took a ride on it and I can tell you it feels very cushy. I did not even need gloves of any kind. Those padded cycling gloves actually stained my palms somewhat black in all the rain during that long ride anyway, so it is nice not having to ride with any gloves. With the foam noodle on my handlebars I can also lean forward with my elbows against my handlebars to completely give my hands and wrists a rest. Considering it only cost me $1.50 the price can not really be beat. In fact I bought two foam noodles just in case I messed up, so now I have a back up foam noodle, which I can also use now in my neighbors pool! J

              _TONE_

               

            • Murray Neill
              Good idea Tone. I ve used pool noodles before to make padding for my kite buggy and it works great! http://kitebuggy.co.nz/archives/000004.html I never thought
              Message 6 of 22 , Aug 26 4:42 PM
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                Good idea Tone. I've used pool noodles before to make padding for my
                kite buggy and it works great!
                http://kitebuggy.co.nz/archives/000004.html
                I never thought to try them on my bike though. I can agree from
                experience on long tours comfort is key and particularly the hands and
                wrists. When touring strength doesn't count for much; its endurance
                that's important and comfort makes all the difference.
                Your bike will probably float now too!

                --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, "Tone" <Tone@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hey guys,
                > You guys know I recently biked 116 miles on my Xtracycle to
                > and from Baltimore within a day. Well, if I did not mention it already
                > my butt and hands were sore for a couple of days afterward. It is really
                > too bad I had totally forgotten the slip-on gel seat cushion I had
                > packed away during my recent move. I actually bought that cushion
                > exactly for the purpose of long touring rides, but simply forgot about
                > it. You better believe the next time I ride down to Baltimore I will
                > remember to pad my saddle!
                > Unfortunately, that still leaves my palms feeling quite
                > tender and out of whack, even though I usually wear padded cycling
                > gloves. The day I biked to Baltimore the rain soaked into the padding,
                > so I think that may have caused the padded gloves to be somewhat
                > pointless. Whatever the issue, I decided to do something about it.
                > I actually did not have any bar tape or grips on my
                > handlebars, so clearly that was a major factor to the pain I felt in my
                > palms following the 116 mile ride. However, while working as a messenger
                > in NYC I got used to not having crap on my handlebars because anything I
                > put on them would just wear down then rip and flake away. Besides, the
                > unusual shape of my handlebars makes it difficult to install grips
                > correctly or properly wrap bar tape.
                > Regardless, after biking the 116 miles I felt handlebar tape
                > or grips would just not be sufficient. I decided to try something a
                > little bit more extreme. My downstairs neighbor recently got one of
                > those 12' diameter 4' deep inflatable ring pools for our backyard, which
                > got me thinking. Upon a visit to a local "Dollar General" store, for
                > only $1.50 I returned home with one of those 5' long foam noodles. With
                > the help of a utility blade to cut the noodle lengthwise down one side
                > along with some 2" wide one-wrap style Velcro straps I usually carry in
                > my Freeloaders anyway, I got some rather interesting results. Check this
                > out and tell me what you think.
                >
                > http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromFront.jpg
                >
                > http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromRear.jpg
                >
                > http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromSeat.jpg
                >
                > Do you guys think it is too absurd? I already took a ride on
                > it and I can tell you it feels very cushy. I did not even need gloves of
                > any kind. Those padded cycling gloves actually stained my palms somewhat
                > black in all the rain during that long ride anyway, so it is nice not
                > having to ride with any gloves. With the foam noodle on my handlebars I
                > can also lean forward with my elbows against my handlebars to completely
                > give my hands and wrists a rest. Considering it only cost me $1.50 the
                > price can not really be beat. In fact I bought two foam noodles just in
                > case I messed up, so now I have a back up foam noodle, which I can also
                > use now in my neighbors pool! :-)
                > _TONE_
                >
              • Tone
                Murray, I am not exactly sure what a kite buggy is. When I first read your reply I was thinking it was another name for a land or ice based wind-surfing,
                Message 7 of 22 , Aug 26 5:48 PM
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                  Murray,

                              I am not exactly sure what a kite buggy is. When I first read your reply I was thinking it was another name for a land or ice based wind-surfing, except with wheels or ice-skates. However, after following your link and looking at the photos I THINK I know what you mean. Basically, it is just a simple three wheeled buggy you sit/recline in and steer with your feet, right? Theoretically you could just roll yourself down a hill like a go-cart, but instead I IMAGINE you use a specially-made “kite” or sail floating up in the air to pull yourself with the winds. J

                              If that is the case, that sounds pretty cool. I never had much luck with even regular kites, so I doubt I would be able to go far in a kite-buggy, so I will stick with my bicycle. J

                              By the looks of it, with those “Pool-Stix” your kite-buggy looks like you could float too! J

                              The main difference in the way you and I applied the tubes for padding appears to be in the manner you were actually more thoughtful. You lubed and slid the Pool-Stix over the entire length of the steel tubing. Where as, I was lazy and simply sliced the Foam Noodle lengthwise (rather than its original extruded “o” shape, I made it into an extruded “c” shape), then attached it with six to eight zip-ties. It was only after I secured the Foam Noodle with zip-ties that I wrapped them in Velcro straps for comfort and a better grip. By using the Velcro straps as a more effective handlebar wrap over the Foam Noodle, I saved myself space in my Freeloaders too.

                              Either way, we both found very effective alternative uses for Pool-Stix and Foam Noodles!

                  _TONE_

                   

                   

                • Bill
                  try the pipe insulation that comes in 4 ft lengths..... easier
                  Message 8 of 22 , Aug 26 8:21 PM
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                    try the pipe insulation that comes in 4 ft lengths.....
                    easier

                                The main difference in the way you and I applied the tubes for padding appears to be in the manner you were actually more thoughtful. You lubed and slid the Pool-Stix over the entire length of the steel tubing. Where as, I was lazy and simply sliced the Foam Noodle lengthwise (rather than its original extruded "o" shape, I made it into an extruded "c" shape), then attached it with six to eight zip-ties. It was only after I secured the Foam Noodle with zip-ties that I wrapped them in Velcro straps for comfort and a better grip. By using the Velcro straps as a more effective handlebar wrap over the Foam Noodle, I saved myself space in my Freeloaders too.

                                Either way, we both found very effective alternative uses for Pool-Stix and Foam Noodles!

                    _TONE_

                     

                     


                  • Murray Neill
                    I have tried that but it is nowhere near as durable as the noodles. The pipe insulation I used first lasted only a few weeks of use before it started breaking
                    Message 9 of 22 , Aug 26 8:32 PM
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                      I have tried that but it is nowhere near as durable as the noodles.
                      The pipe insulation I used first lasted only a few weeks of use before
                      it started breaking up. The noodle has lasted two seasons so far.

                      --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Bill <coteau@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > try the pipe insulation that comes in 4 ft lengths.....
                      > easier
                    • David Chase
                      ... If only the noodle were a little less gigantic. And I guess they would have to be durable, given how they get (ab)used in the pool. My solution to
                      Message 10 of 22 , Aug 26 9:20 PM
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                        > I have tried that but it is nowhere near as durable as the noodles.
                        > The pipe insulation I used first lasted only a few weeks of use before
                        > it started breaking up. The noodle has lasted two seasons so far.
                        If only the noodle were a little less gigantic. And I guess they
                        would have to be durable, given how they get (ab)used in the pool.

                        My solution to tired/sore/numb hands was somewhat less drastic (but
                        more expensive, and probably not as cushy). I just double-wrapped my
                        handlebars with cork/cork-like tape.

                        David
                      • Juergen Weichert
                        Soon we (I?) will be adding Xtracycles to recumbent bikes! :-) Juergen
                        Message 11 of 22 , Aug 27 12:57 PM
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                          Soon we (I?) will be adding Xtracycles to recumbent bikes! :-)
                          Juergen


                          Tone wrote:
                          >
                          > Hey guys,
                          >
                          > You guys know I recently biked 116 miles on my Xtracycle to and from
                          > Baltimore within a day. Well, if I did not mention it already my butt
                          > and hands were sore for a couple of days afterward. It is really too
                          > bad I had totally forgotten the slip-on gel seat cushion I had packed
                          > away during my recent move. I actually bought that cushion exactly for
                          > the purpose of long touring rides, but simply forgot about it. You
                          > better believe the next time I ride down to Baltimore I will remember
                          > to pad my saddle!
                          >
                          > Unfortunately, that still leaves my palms feeling quite tender and out
                          > of whack, even though I usually wear padded cycling gloves. The day I
                          > biked to Baltimore the rain soaked into the padding, so I think that
                          > may have caused the padded gloves to be somewhat pointless. Whatever
                          > the issue, I decided to do something about it.
                          >
                          > I actually did not have any bar tape or grips on my handlebars, so
                          > clearly that was a major factor to the pain I felt in my palms
                          > following the 116 mile ride. However, while working as a messenger in
                          > NYC I got used to not having crap on my handlebars because anything I
                          > put on them would just wear down then rip and flake away. Besides, the
                          > unusual shape of my handlebars makes it difficult to install grips
                          > correctly or properly wrap bar tape.
                          >
                          > Regardless, after biking the 116 miles I felt handlebar tape or grips
                          > would just not be sufficient. I decided to try something a little bit
                          > more extreme. My downstairs neighbor recently got one of those 12’
                          > diameter 4’ deep inflatable ring pools for our backyard, which got me
                          > thinking. Upon a visit to a local “Dollar General” store, for only
                          > $1.50 I returned home with one of those 5’ long foam noodles. With the
                          > help of a utility blade to cut the noodle lengthwise down one side
                          > along with some 2” wide one-wrap style Velcro straps I usually carry
                          > in my Freeloaders anyway, I got some rather interesting results. Check
                          > this out and tell me what you think…
                          >
                          > http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromFront.jpg
                          > <http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromFront.jpg>
                          >
                          > http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromRear.jpg
                          > <http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromRear.jpg>
                          >
                          > http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromSeat.jpg
                          > <http://www.moon-shine.net/xs/HandleBars-FromSeat.jpg>
                          >
                          > Do you guys think it is too absurd? I already took a ride on it and I
                          > can tell you it feels very cushy. I did not even need gloves of any
                          > kind. Those padded cycling gloves actually stained my palms somewhat
                          > black in all the rain during that long ride anyway, so it is nice not
                          > having to ride with any gloves. With the foam noodle on my handlebars
                          > I can also lean forward with my elbows against my handlebars to
                          > completely give my hands and wrists a rest. Considering it only cost
                          > me $1.50 the price can not really be beat. In fact I bought two foam
                          > noodles just in case I messed up, so now I have a back up foam noodle,
                          > which I can also use now in my neighbors pool! J
                          >
                          > _/TONE/_
                          >
                          > __._
                        • Ken Ismert
                          ... Here s a link, if you haven t seen it, of just that: Recumbent Trucks http://www.angletechcycles.com/bikes/freighter/index.htm These are Xtracycle upgrades
                          Message 12 of 22 , Aug 28 5:30 PM
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                            --- In rootsradicals@yahoogroups.com, Juergen Weichert <juergen@...>
                            wrote:
                            >
                            > Soon we (I?) will be adding Xtracycles to recumbent bikes! :-)
                            > Juergen
                            >

                            Here's a link, if you haven't seen it, of just that:

                            Recumbent Trucks
                            http://www.angletechcycles.com/bikes/freighter/index.htm

                            These are Xtracycle upgrades to RANS recumbents...

                            -Ken
                          • Tone
                            Did someone mention Kona s 2008 cargo bike, which they are calling the Ute ? The name sounds familiar, but I do not remember seeing a picture of it. Here is a
                            Message 13 of 22 , Sep 6, 2007
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                                          Did someone mention Kona’s 2008 cargo bike, which they are calling the “Ute”? The name sounds familiar, but I do not remember seeing a picture of it. Here is a link:

                              http://www.konaworld.com/08_ute.htm

                                          It costs $800 USD, and unless I am reading the specs wrong, it only has front brakes(?)! It also looks like their web page is buggy because a number of the links to the right do not seem to display correctly.

                               

                                          I find it funny how there seems to be a number of companies coming out with cargo-style bikes… now that Xtracycle has really pushed the market first. Of course it is nice to know major bicycle manufacturers are appreciating the value of a bicycle for practical, work, and hauling purposes.

                                          I will certainly stick with the Xtracycle or the Big Dummy when it comes out though. At least I know Surly collaborated with Xtracycle to tweak all the design kinks out of the Big Dummy before releasing it. I also really like how the Free Radical’s design allows it to be adaptable for different uses depending on what Xtracycle-brand or retrofitted attachments are put on.

                               

                              _TONE_

                               

                            • murray
                              The first thing that struck me when I saw that picture of the ute was the size of the bags. It has that wonderful big cargo rack and on it they have a little
                              Message 14 of 22 , Sep 6, 2007
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                                The first thing that struck me when I saw that picture of the ute was the size of the bags. It has that wonderful big cargo rack and on it they have a little bag which looks smaller than a saddle bag you might find on a 'normal' bike. Its not much bigger than your average fannypack. I read you have the option of getting 4 bags instead of two but even then they look like they would be no match for the versatility of the freeloaders.
                                Nice frame, let down by wimpy bags.

                                On 9/7/07, Tone <Tone@...> wrote:

                                            Did someone mention Kona's 2008 cargo bike, which they are calling the "Ute"? The name sounds familiar, but I do not remember seeing a picture of it. Here is a link:

                                http://www.konaworld.com/08_ute.htm

                                            It costs $800 USD, and unless I am reading the specs wrong, it only has front brakes(?)! It also looks like their web page is buggy because a number of the links to the right do not seem to display correctly.

                                 

                                            I find it funny how there seems to be a number of companies coming out with cargo-style bikes… now that Xtracycle has really pushed the market first. Of course it is nice to know major bicycle manufacturers are appreciating the value of a bicycle for practical, work, and hauling purposes.

                                            I will certainly stick with the Xtracycle or the Big Dummy when it comes out though. At least I know Surly collaborated with Xtracycle to tweak all the design kinks out of the Big Dummy before releasing it. I also really like how the Free Radical's design allows it to be adaptable for different uses depending on what Xtracycle-brand or retrofitted attachments are put on.

                                 

                                _TONE_

                                 


                              • Mark Garvey
                                yeah, I agree! I LOVE the Freeloaders and my GOD how much stuff can you pack into them if you add the wideloaders! This is where i think Surly has it right.
                                Message 15 of 22 , Sep 6, 2007
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                                  yeah, I agree!  I LOVE the Freeloaders and my GOD how much stuff can you pack into them if you add the wideloaders! This is where i think Surly has it right.  they are working WITH Xtracycle to make a compatible system.  I am so entheused that I am saving up my nickles and dimes and planning to buy a Surly bike of some sort.  Instigator or a LHT probably rather than a Big dummy.  Mostly because it would mean that my X will be no longer useful!  WAH!  Unless Of course I move it to a DIFFERENT bike........Oh, why did I say that!  Insanity.....

                                  mark

                                  On 9/6/07, murray <murrayneill@...> wrote:
                                  The first thing that struck me when I saw that picture of the ute was the size of the bags. It has that wonderful big cargo rack and on it they have a little bag which looks smaller than a saddle bag you might find on a 'normal' bike. Its not much bigger than your average fannypack. I read you have the option of getting 4 bags instead of two but even then they look like they would be no match for the versatility of the freeloaders.
                                  Nice frame, let down by wimpy bags.


                                  On 9/7/07, Tone < Tone@...> wrote:

                                              Did someone mention Kona's 2008 cargo bike, which they are calling the "Ute"? The name sounds familiar, but I do not remember seeing a picture of it. Here is a link:

                                  http://www.konaworld.com/08_ute.htm

                                              It costs $800 USD, and unless I am reading the specs wrong, it only has front brakes(?)! It also looks like their web page is buggy because a number of the links to the right do not seem to display correctly.

                                   

                                              I find it funny how there seems to be a number of companies coming out with cargo-style bikes… now that Xtracycle has really pushed the market first. Of course it is nice to know major bicycle manufacturers are appreciating the value of a bicycle for practical, work, and hauling purposes.

                                              I will certainly stick with the Xtracycle or the Big Dummy when it comes out though. At least I know Surly collaborated with Xtracycle to tweak all the design kinks out of the Big Dummy before releasing it. I also really like how the Free Radical's design allows it to be adaptable for different uses depending on what Xtracycle-brand or retrofitted attachments are put on.

                                   

                                  _TONE_

                                   





                                  --
                                  Putting the fun in dysfunctional for over 50 years!


                                  Mark  Garvey
                                  Cedar Rapids, Iowa free state!

                                  Check out the web site at:
                                  http://www.vine-ave.com  

                                  contact us to have INVISIBLE INC! appear at your next program!  Details at www.vine-ave.com

                                  I am a bicycling lifestylist!
                                • Michael Lemberger
                                  ... I think what s posted on Kona s site is pretty preliminary. There s more info over on Bike Hugger:
                                  Message 16 of 22 , Sep 7, 2007
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                                    on Sep 6, 2007 Tone wrote:

                                    > It costs $800 USD, and unless I am reading the specs wrong, it only
                                    > has front brakes(?)! It also looks like their web page is buggy
                                    > because a number of the links to the right do not seem to display
                                    > correctly.

                                    I think what's posted on Kona's site is pretty preliminary. There's
                                    more info over on Bike Hugger:

                                    <http://bikehugger.com/2007/08/more_on_konas_ute.htm>

                                    ...looks like it will have a rear v-brake. I'm not sure why you'd mix
                                    brake technologies on a production bike, but I guess it's been done
                                    before (with U-brakes and cantilevers on early mountain bikes, for
                                    example.)

                                    > I find it funny how there seems to be a number of companies coming
                                    > out with cargo-style bikes. now that Xtracycle has really pushed
                                    > the market first. Of course it is nice to know major bicycle
                                    > manufacturers are appreciating the value of a bicycle for
                                    > practical, work, and hauling purposes.

                                    I agree that this is a positive direction for bicycle technology, and
                                    I give Xtracycle a ton of credit for pushing utilitarian longbikes
                                    into the mainstream. Of course, like many things in cycling, it's not
                                    an entirely new technology: <http://clevercycles.com/?p=7>

                                    > I will certainly stick with the Xtracycle or the Big Dummy when it
                                    > comes out though. At least I know Surly collaborated with Xtracycle
                                    > to tweak all the design kinks out of the Big Dummy before releasing
                                    > it. I also really like how the Free Radical's design allows it to
                                    > be adaptable for different uses depending on what Xtracycle-brand
                                    > or retrofitted attachments are put on.

                                    I agree that the Free Radical and Big Dummy designs offer a more
                                    flexible platform than the Kona design. I don't necessarily think
                                    that it's a one-size-fits-all solution though, and Kona's bike may be
                                    more appropriate for some people's needs. I hope Kona's entry into
                                    this part of the market becomes part of a rising tide that will lift
                                    all boats.

                                    Cheers,

                                    Michael (Mauricio B.) Lemberger
                                    Madison, WI
                                    sconnyboy.blogspot.com
                                  • David Chase
                                    Looking at the two sites, and looking at the picture, and considering our recent discussion on tires, I think one problem with this bike is that it might not
                                    Message 17 of 22 , Sep 7, 2007
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Looking at the two sites, and looking at the picture, and considering
                                      our
                                      recent discussion on tires, I think one problem with this bike is
                                      that it
                                      might not support really large (2.35 inch) tires, and it might have
                                      limited
                                      clearance for snow tires. There's a post extending between the rear
                                      stays (in the picture) that ought not be quite so long as it is in
                                      the picture.

                                      On 2007-09-07, at 10:57 AM, Michael Lemberger wrote:
                                      > I think what's posted on Kona's site is pretty preliminary. There's
                                      > more info over on Bike Hugger:
                                      > <http://bikehugger.com/2007/08/more_on_konas_ute.htm>
                                      >
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